Climate Matters

CLIMATE WEEK 2015

September 21-28 marks the 7th annual Climate Week in New York City. Climate Week 2015 aims to bring together an international group of leaders to discuss and promote a global movement in energy, technology, and business towards a more sustainable world. Events will be held throughout the week in NYC and online.

This week, we take an overall, big-picture look at how we really know that climate change is happening, and that our own emissions of greenhouse gases are a big part of the reason. Here are resources and analysis of climate change indicators, as well as additional graphics, videos and projections that help contextualize both the local and global impacts of climate change.

Indicators of Climate Change

Click on the indicators below for more information and on-air graphics!

2015 So Far - Rankings

Arctic Sea Ice

2015 So Far - Rankings

El Niño

2015 So Far - Rankings

Ocean Acidification

2015 So Far - Rankings

Carbon Dioxide

2015 So Far - Rankings

Extreme Heat

2015 So Far - Rankings

Snow Cover

2015 So Far - Rankings

Sea Level Rise

2015 So Far - Rankings

Land Ice

2015 So Far - Rankings

U.S. Wildfires

2015 So Far - Rankings

Global Temp

Daily Tweets for Climate Week


Monday: Our world is warming. Take a look at the climate change indicators: http://bit.ly/1iSS6Go #climatematters

Tuesday: CO2 levels are the highest they have been in at least 800,000 years and maybe millions of years: http://bit.ly/1AKqrMh #climatematters

Wednesday: Through the decades, see how record daily highs are outpacing record lows with climate change: http://bit.ly/1NuhrSF #climatematters

Thursday: New data from NOAA: 2015 was the hottest summer on record, and on track for hottest year globally: http://bit.ly/1W5e1sr #climatematters

Friday: The number of large wildfires and area burned across the West is rising due to the impacts of climate change: http://bit.ly/1LwK7s2 #climatematters

Another Indicator of Climate Change: More Heavy Precipitation

We also expect to see more heavy rain as a result of climate change. With hotter temperatures, more water evaporates off the oceans, and the atmosphere can hold more moisture. That means that there is often a lot more water available to come down as rain – and as snow.

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