Summers are getting hotter across most of the country. And Atlantic hurricane season starts June 1, with rising sea levels worsening storm surge from landfalling storms.

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HAPPY METEOROLOGICAL SUMMER!


Summers are getting hotter across most of the country.

 

Atlantic hurricane season starts June 1, with rising sea levels worsening storm surge from landfalling storms.

 

Trend in summer average temperature
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Summer temperature trends by climate division
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Happy meteorological summer! This week, we examine the average summer temperature trend in our Climate Matters markets. Summers are trending hotter for 92% of the markets we analyzed, with locations in Texas and the Intermountain West experiencing the most warming since 1970.

 

Additionally, we examined summer temperature trends in all of the NCEI climate divisions. Much like the individual market analyses, warming trends are most dramatic in Texas and the West. The vast majority of the country is warming, with only a few climate divisions, mostly in the Northern Plains, showing little or no warming (although that region is warming dramatically in fall and winter).

 

This is a reminder that even as increasing greenhouse gases raise global temperatures, warming will not be uniform across all areas. Nonetheless, hotter summers raise the risk of heat-related illnesses, such as dehydration, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke.

 

HURRICANE SEASON


Oceans Heating Up Warming Tropical Waters
5-year average of Atlantic hurricanes Atlantic Hurricane Climatology


Atlantic hurricane season begins on June 1. Global oceans have warmed, creating conditions favorable for stronger hurricanes and heavier rainfall. In turn, the increased rainfall from landfalling storms raises the risk of inland flooding.

Rising ocean levels driven by climate change will continue to worsen a hurricane’s storm surge, as sea levels have already risen eight inches globally over the last hundred years. NOAA’s latest scenarios suggest a rise up to 12 feet is possible at some U.S. coastal locations by 2100 in an extreme case, although 2-4 feet appear much more likely.

Regarding the future intensity of hurricanes, current research suggests that the frequency of the most intense hurricanes may increase with climate change, and the rain near the center of the storms will get heavier.



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