Support Our Work

John Upton

John Upton

Editorial

John Upton is a Features Journalist at Climate Central. He has science and business degrees and more than a decade of international reporting experience. He has written for the New York Times, Slate, Nautilus, VICE, Grist, Pacific Standard, Modern Farmer, and Audubon magazine. Upton's major projects have included "Breathing Fire," "The Injustice of Atlantic City’s Floods," "Disaster and Neglect in Louisiana," and "Pulp Fiction."

Featured News:

How Smoke From California’s Fires is Harming the Most Vulnerable

How Smoke From California’s Fires is Harming the Most Vulnerable

David Ewing wore a bright white dust mask, his face behind it puffy and red, as he sat on a stone bench in downtown Santa Barbara, California. A fine layer of ash covered the pavement at his feet, dirty residue from wildfires ravaging the region. “When I woke up yesterday I couldn't breathe,” said Ewing, who is homeless and has been diagnosed with… Read More

Breathing Fire

Breathing Fire

As the deadliest fires in California history swept through leafy neighborhoods here, Kathleen Sarmento fled her home in the dark, drove to an evacuation center and began setting up a medical triage unit. Patients with burns and other severe injuries were dispatched to hospitals. She set about treating many people whose symptoms resulted from… Read More

Disaster and Neglect in Louisiana

Disaster and Neglect in Louisiana

A year after the worst rainstorm in a rainy state’s history killed 13 and damaged nearly 100,000 homes, the federal government has provided less than half of what Louisiana says it needs to recover. Adding to the rebuilding woes, FEMA rejected a $16 million request to fund counseling services beyond Aug. 25, even as the state’s residents report … Read More

Electric Cars Becoming Popular As Grid Gets Greener

Electric Cars Becoming Popular As Grid Gets Greener

KNOXVILLE, TENN. — The amount of heat-trapping pollution that’s released every time Bill Williams drives his electric sedan a mile down a road here has fallen by about a quarter in the three years since he bought it. Williams’ car hasn’t changed, but the electricity that powers it has. In Tennessee, power once generated overwhelmingly by coal has… Read More

The Injustice of Atlantic City’s Floods

The Injustice of Atlantic City’s Floods

New Jersey's working class are forgotten as federal government funds fixes for wealthier neighbors.

New EU Wood Energy Rules Threaten Climate, Forests

New EU Wood Energy Rules Threaten Climate, Forests

As American foresters ramp up logging to meet the growing demand for wood pellets by power plants on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, a new European wood energy proposal would allow the power plants to continue claiming their operations are green for at least 13 more years, despite releasing more heat-trapping pollution than coal. Most of the… Read More

‘Ghost Forests’ Appear As Rising Seas Kill Trees

‘Ghost Forests’ Appear As Rising Seas Kill Trees

Bare trunks of dead coastal forests are being discovered up and down the mid-Atlantic coastline, killed by the advance of rising seas. The “ghost forests,” as scientists call them, offer eerie evidence of some of the world’s fastest rates of sea level rise. Forests provide habitat and protect against global warming, but they’re declining worldwide … Read More

Mud Shortage Eroding California’s Climate Defenses

Mud Shortage Eroding California’s Climate Defenses

As agencies and nonprofits toil to restore and conserve San Francisco Bay Area marshlands, aiming to defend against rising seas and nurture wildlife, and as voters consider introducing a property tax to support the effort, a bewildering crisis has emerged. There’s not enough mud. Marshes capture mud from water to grow and sustain themselves. A wo… Read More

Climate Change Is Leaving Native Plants Behind

Climate Change Is Leaving Native Plants Behind

Willis Linn Jepson encountered a squat shrub while he was collecting botanical specimens on California’s Mount Tamalpais in the fall of 1936. He trimmed off a few branches and jotted down the location along the ridge trail where the manzanita grew, 2,255 feet above sea level. The desiccated specimen is now part of an herbarium here that’s named … Read More

Pulp Fiction, The Series

Pulp Fiction, The Series

Pulp Fiction, a three-part series — described in the New York Times as “a compelling and infuriating package” — chronicles the fast-growing practice of wood burning for electricity, and its impact on the climate. It was the culmination of five months of investigative reporting in England and the U.S. Part 1: The European Accounting Error That’s Wa… Read More