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WMO Annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin

October 2016

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is the United Nations system’s authoritative voice on weather, climate, and water. Since 2006, the WMO has published an annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin that reports the latest trends and atmospheric burdens of the most influential, long-lived greenhouse gases.

Note to weather presenters:  This is a global release of climate graphics and information for weather presenters by WMO and Climate Central. To enable us to sustain this effort, we kindly invite you to inform us about how you were able to use this story (including, if possible, URLs). Please email this information to mwilliams@wmo.int and bplacky@climatecentral.org.

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Report Summary

The World Meteorological Organization's Greenhouse Gas Bulletin is published annually to report on the latest trends in atmospheric concentrations of the most important long-lived greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). It also provides a summary of the contributions made by the other greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change. The Bulletin represents the consensus of a consortium of observation networks that have been in operation since the mid-1980s. The 2015 Bulletin is being release in advance of the Marrakesh climate conference (COP-22) to ensure that the talks have access to the most up-to-date scientific information available. Here are some of the key takeaways from this year’s report:

  • Globally averaged levels of Carbon Dioxide reached 400ppm in 2015; that’s 144% higher than the pre-industrial average.
  • The strong El Niño event fueled the CO2 growth spurt by reducing the capacity of vegetation to absorb CO2 and increasing emissions from forest fires.
  • Methane was at 256% of its average pre-industrial levels in 2015.
  • Nitrous Oxide was at 121% of pre-industrial levels.
  • CFCs are mostly decreasing in concentration, but some HFCs and HCFCs are increasing at relatively rapid rates.
  • WMO and partners are working towards an Integrated Global Greenhouse Information System to help nations track, report, and add to their national emissions pledges and mitigation actions.

FULL REPORT >>

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Graphics

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Animations


WMO has produced short animations to promote a new concept for monitoring GHG emissions, sources and sinks. “The carbon cycle” provides basic background about rising atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases. “Measuring national emissions” and “Monitoring the atmosphere to reduce urban greenhouse gas emissions” describe how high-resolution monitoring of the atmosphere can now be used to more accurately measure GHG emissions in order to support decision-making. They are available in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish versions here. To receive high-resolution versions, please contact mwilliams@wmo.int or cnullis@wmo.int.

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U.S. Emissions
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U.S. Sources
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Rising Concentrations
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Global Emissions
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Global Sources
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Carbon Dioxide Budget
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For these graphics in Spanish, please visit our Spanish Climate Matters archive.

Greenhouse Gas Effect
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Climate Change Powerpoint Presentation
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The power point presentation is designed to introduce to the fundamentals of climate science to non-technical audiences.

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Webinar

If you missed the webinar with Oksana Tarasova, WMO and Dr. Scott Denning, Colorado State University, you can access it here to learn more about the updated Greenhouse Gas Bulletin, trends in greenhouse gas concentrations, and what they mean for the world.

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Global Temperature Update

Increasing greenhouse gas concentrations are having a noticeable impact on global temperature trends — more greenhouse gases mean hotter temperatures worldwide.

Global Temperature Anomalies
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Global Temperature Horse Race
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SOCCOM (Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling Project)

About half of all CO2 taken up by the oceans is absorbed in the Southern Ocean. For the first time, scientists with the Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling Project (SOCCOM) have been collecting data there using robotic floats. Join those scientists on Tuesday, Oct. 25 as they discuss their observations via Google Hangouts at soccom.princeton.edu.

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WXshift — Climate Change Indicators

These resources and analyses of climate change indicators help contextualize both local and global impacts of climate change.

Arctic Sea Ice

El Niño

Ocean Acidification

Carbon Dioxide

Extreme Heat

Snow Cover

Sea Level Rise

Land Ice

U.S. Wildfires

Global Temperature

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