About Section
Who we are

Michael D. Lemonick

Michael D. Lemonick

Editorial

Michael Lemonick is a writer at large for Climate Central. Prior to that, he covered science and the environment for TIME magazine for nearly 21 years, where he wrote more than 50 cover stories, and has also written for Discover, Scientific American, Wired, New Scientist, The Washington Post and National Geographic. Lemonick is the author of six books, and a cover story for TIME was featured in the anthology “Best American Science and Nature Writing 2007.” He has taught science and environmental journalism at Princeton, Columbia, Johns Hopkins and New York Universities. He holds a Master of Science in Journalism from Columbia University.

Most Recent News Entries:

Bad News Keeps Flowing From Antarctica

Bad News Keeps Flowing From Antarctica

The massive shelves of ice that ring Antarctica have been shrinking over the past couple of decades, and that could have grave implications for sea level rise. It’s not the ice shelves themselves that pose a problem: they’re mostly afloat, so when they melt or dump massive icebergs, it doesn’t affect water levels any more than melting ice cubes … Read More

With Climate Change, Ticks Marching Farther and Earlier

With Climate Change, Ticks Marching Farther and Earlier

You might not be aware of it, but May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month, devoted to reminding people who spend time in wooded areas to cover up. Otherwise, a bite from a black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis, a.k.a. a deer tick) could lead to joint and muscle pain — and in some cases, to chronic arthritis, mental confusion and even heart problems.… Read More

The Surprising Link Between Fjords and Carbon

The Surprising Link Between Fjords and Carbon

The magnificent, steep-sided fjords that slice deeply into the coastlines of New Zealand, Norway and Alaska are hugely popular attractions for tourists. But they may be surprisingly important to the Earth’s climate system as well. While fjords make up just one tenth of one percent of the oceans’ surface area they account for about 11 percent … Read More

Blooming Algae Could Accelerate Arctic Warming

Blooming Algae Could Accelerate Arctic Warming

Scientists already know that receding sea ice allows solar energy to warm exposed water rather than reflect back into space, but blooms of algae could make matters even worse. By the end of the century, researchers say, the blooms could lead Arctic warming to increase by as much as 20 percent.… Read More

Extreme Heat and Heavy Rain Events Expected to Double

Extreme Heat and Heavy Rain Events Expected to Double

Extreme weather events such as droughts, heat waves and torrential rainfalls are the most powerful and obvious reminders that the climate is changing. These disasters were happening long before humans started pumping heat-trapping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, but global warming has tipped the odds in their favor. A devastating heat wave … Read More

Scientists Turn to Drones For Closer Look at Sea Ice

Scientists Turn to Drones For Closer Look at Sea Ice

An oceanographer at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is calling on a 21st century technology to understand exactly how the floating ice that clogs the world’s northernmost seas every winter breaks up and melts.… Read More

New Studies Reveal Climate Extremes From Fire to Ice

New Studies Reveal Climate Extremes From Fire to Ice

Climate scientists don't just rely on computer models and contemporary observations to understand the intimate relationship between CO2 in the atmosphere and environmental conditions on Earth. They also look to the ancient past — and two reports in recent days have made it clear how intimate that relationship is. One chronicles an episode 2.4 … Read More

Thawing Permafrost Will ‘Seep, Not Explode’ CO2

Thawing Permafrost Will ‘Seep, Not Explode’ CO2

The Arctic holds more than a trillion tons of carbon, locked in the frozen soil known as permafrost. That’s more than twice as much carbon as there is in the atmosphere itself, according to a 2013 report from the National Academy of Sciences. And as the climate warms under its growing blanket of human-generated greenhouse gases, thawing permafrost … Read More

The Future of Mountain Glaciers Is Bleak

The Future of Mountain Glaciers Is Bleak

Melting ice in Greenland and Antarctica get far more attention, but mountain glaciers around the world — in the Rockies, the Andes, the Himalayas and other ranges — are melting as well as the planet heats up. All told, say climate modelers, the water they release could contribute about a foot’s worth of the 3 to 6 feet of sea level rise projected … Read More

Gallery

Countries That Set New Record Highs in 2010 More countries have set new record high temperatures in 2010 than during any other year since instrumental records began.

View Gallery