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Brian Kahn

Brian Kahn

Editorial

Brian Kahn is a Web editor at Climate Central. He previously worked at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society and partnered with climate.gov to produce multimedia stories, manage social media campaigns and develop version 2.0 of climate.gov. His writing has also appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Grist, the Daily Kos, Justmeans and the Yale Forum on Climate Change in the Media. In previous lives, he led sleigh ride tours through a herd of 7,000 elk and guided tourists around the deepest lake in the U.S. He holds an M.A. in Climate and Society from Columbia University. 

Most Recent News Entries:

Earth, Now Available in Ultra High Definition

Earth, Now Available in Ultra High Definition

A year in weather in high definition was pretty amazing and so was a similar sharp take on the spring equinox. But a five day view of the planet from space in ultra high definition is a whole other level of awesome. The imagery from mid-May 2011 comes courtesy of Russia’s high flying Elektro-L weather satellite, which sits in high Earth orbit more … Read More

Climate Investments ‘Falling Short’ of 2°C Goal

Climate Investments ‘Falling Short’ of 2°C Goal

Staving off the worst impacts of climate change by investing in clean energy and smart climate adaptations makes economic sense, but a new report shows that investments are still lagging globally. At the same time, the dropping costs of clean energy, particularly solar, mean that companies are doing more with less. The annual Global Landscape of C… Read More

World Needs to Mind the Carbon Emissions Gap

World Needs to Mind the Carbon Emissions Gap

A new report suggests that policymakers better mind the gap if they want to meet the 2°C global warming threshold. But in spite of the warning, that chasm is growing as the world’s carbon dioxide emissions continue to rise. To bridge the gap, the world will have to reduce emissions to reach net carbon dioxide (CO2) neutrality sometime between 2055-… Read More

40 Years of Scratching Reveals Ocean Acidification Data

40 Years of Scratching Reveals Ocean Acidification Data

As carbon dioxide levels increase due largely to human emissions, the world’s oceans are becoming highly corrosive to a number of organisms that call it home. But the rate of acidification and related changes are anything but uniform. That’s why a new study aims to set a baseline for nearly every patch of saltwater from sea to acidifying sea so tha… Read More

NASA Shows Stark Year in the Life of CO2

NASA Shows Stark Year in the Life of CO2

This is what your atmosphere looks like on carbon dioxide. And it’s not a pretty sight. NASA provides a stark and stunning view of a year in the life of our planet as humans continue to emit greenhouse gases that warm the planet. The animation comes courtesy of one of the highest-resolution computer models in existence. Since the Industrial Revolut… Read More

NASA, Other Data Show Globe Had Warmest October

NASA, Other Data Show Globe Had Warmest October

For the third month in a row, global temperatures reached record territory according to newly available data from NASA. And if one global temperature record isn’t enough, the Japanese Meteorological Agency also provided new data on Friday that showed the warmest October on record. Data from NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) show this … Read More

Feel the Heat: Fourth-Warmest October for U.S.

Feel the Heat: Fourth-Warmest October for U.S.

It might be chilly (OK, downright Arctic) in the middle third of the U.S. these days, but if you live there, you can warm yourself with memories of October. According to new data released Thursday, October wasn’t just a little warm, it was the fourth warmest October for the lower 48 on record and not a single state recorded below normal temperature… Read More

What You Need to Know About U.S.-China Climate Pact

What You Need to Know About U.S.-China Climate Pact

It’s been a busy few months for international movement on climate change. Following a September climate march and meetings at the United Nations and an announcement by the European Union to cut greenhouse gas emissions, President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping topped it all by announcing a new joint climate commitment late on Tuesday. “As … Read More

No Recovery, But a Sliver of Drought Gain for Calif.

No Recovery, But a Sliver of Drought Gain for Calif.

The phrase “abnormally dry” might conjure up a skin condition or your preferred type of martini. But it might just be the most positive words uttered in months about California’s relentless drought. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor released Thursday, a tiny sliver of the Golden State is no longer in drought, the first time that’s happened sinc… Read More

An Inside Look at How Monster Tornadoes Can Form

An Inside Look at How Monster Tornadoes Can Form

Ever wondered what it would look like if 90s blockbusters “Twister” and “The Matrix” were mashed up? OK probably not, but if it did happen, this 3-D model of a tornado is a likely candidate. Leigh Orf, a meteorologist at Central Michigan University, presented a model simulation of a what can cause and sustain a violent EF-5 tornado — the most dama… Read More

Ozone Hole Recovery Continues, Albeit a Little Slower

Ozone Hole Recovery Continues, Albeit a Little Slower

The ozone hole is a gash in the stratosphere, like a festering wound high above the earth’s surface. Scientists first diagnosed the problem in the mid-1980s and recommended a course of action to treat the problem. And today, NASA announced that recovery has continued, though slightly slower this year compared to years past.… Read More

Drying Amazon Could Be Major Carbon Concern

Drying Amazon Could Be Major Carbon Concern

The lungs of the planet are drying out, threatening to cause Earth to cough up some of its carbon reserves. The Amazon rainforest inhales massive amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping keep the globe’s carbon budget in balance (at least until human emissions started throwing that balance off). But since 2000, drier conditions are ca… Read More

One of Sao Paulo’s Biggest Reservoirs Is Nearly Dry

One of Sao Paulo’s Biggest Reservoirs Is Nearly Dry

Drought is taking its toll on the water system that quenches the thirst of Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paolo, to such a degree that it is visible to orbiting satellites. Sao Paolo is facing water rationing as the worst drought to hit the region in decades reduces reservoirs to muddy waters surrounded by cracked earth. The Cantareira Reservoir … Read More

El Niño Brings Floods, Risks — and Opportunities

El Niño Brings Floods, Risks — and Opportunities

The phantom El Niño continues to hold sway over the weather and climate world, in part because it has such a strong influence on weather patterns around the globe. But the weather it influences isn’t the end of the story or even the biggest point. What really matters is how those shifts can lead to flooding or drought. A new study looks at those d… Read More

Climate Change Takes Center Stage on Instagram

Climate Change Takes Center Stage on Instagram

Odorless, invisible gases cause the buildup of heat in the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans that lead to climate change. Those changes, such as shifts in rainfall patterns and the acidification of sea waters, are ones that happen in the long-term, relegating them to the background and making them hard to notice. The International Center for Photograph… Read More

Calif. Heads for Warmest Year As Drought Hangs On

Calif. Heads for Warmest Year As Drought Hangs On

Heavy precipitation fell across parts of the West in September, and while some locations saw top-10 wettest Septembers, much of the region is still mired in deep drought. Part of that is due to the excess heat that’s afflicted the region this year, including what’s been the warmest year to date in California according to U.S. temperature data relea… Read More

Pentagon: Climate Change Poses ‘Immediate Risks’

Pentagon: Climate Change Poses ‘Immediate Risks’

The Department of Defense sees climate change as an “immediate” risk and is taking steps to assess those risk and respond to them according to its newly unveiled Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap. The document, released on Monday, is an update to the agency’s first climate roadmap released in 2012. But rather than being a slight tweak, it provides… Read More

The $9.7 Trillion Problem: Cyclones and Climate Change

The $9.7 Trillion Problem: Cyclones and Climate Change

You can do a lot with $9.7 trillion: buy all the real estate in Manhattan 12 times over, purchase 22 carbon copies of Apple, or an absurd quantity of apples. It’s also the amount of money that tropical cyclones could cost the global economy over the next century, especially if climate projections of fewer but more intense cyclones are accurate. In… Read More

Greenland Sediment Sheds Light on Sea Level Rise

Greenland Sediment Sheds Light on Sea Level Rise

Greenland’s ice sheet is scraping rock bottom. No, it’s not hard up and in need of a loan. As ice moves from the center of the island to the sea, it’s scraping bedrock and transporting clues about just how fast the ice sheet is melting from the bottom up and what that means for sea level rise. The planet’s largest island is mostly covered in ice up… Read More

A Timeline of 2013 Extreme Weather and Global Warming

A Timeline of 2013 Extreme Weather and Global Warming

On Monday, the Bulletin of the American Meteolorogical Society released its annual look at extreme weather events and the role of climate change in causing them. More than 90 scientists from 14 countries compiled the report, which examined 16 separate events ranging from scorching heat to heavy rains to searing drought that occurred in 2013. Check … Read More

Gravity Shift Reveals West Antarctic Ice Loss

Gravity Shift Reveals West Antarctic Ice Loss

The West Antarctic Ice Sheet is headed toward “unstoppable” collapse according to recent studies. A new visual released by the European Space Agency show what the start of that collapse looks like both for the mass of the ice sheet and its signature on the planet’s gravitational field. We think of gravity as a constant, holding us in place on the p… Read More

U.S. International Aid Gets Climate Makeover

U.S. International Aid Gets Climate Makeover

The U.S. will change the way it approaches international development projects, helping communities adapt to the climatic changes that its fossil fuel burning has helped to create. But experts question whether the new initiative, announced Tuesday, will be enough to help Bangladeshis who are suffering worsening floods, Pacific Islanders whose lands … Read More

People’s Climate March Makes Front-Page News

People’s Climate March Makes Front-Page News

When 400,000 people hit the streets, perhaps it isn't surprising that it makes headline news. And that's just what happened on Sunday when the People's Climate March shut down thoroughfares around New York as part of the largest climate action in history. The march drew a wide cross-section of society from public figures like Ban Ki-moon, Al Gore a… Read More

El Niño is Kinda Sorta Maybe Here

El Niño is Kinda Sorta Maybe Here

El Niño watchers, rejoice (maybe). A weak El Niño has formed (sorta). On Tuesday, researchers at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society said a borderline El Niño is upon us, with the odds for further development increasing throughout the fall and winter. This El Niño has played a game of hide and seek since an El Niño Watch… Read More

Another Year, Another Record High for Greenhouse Gases

Another Year, Another Record High for Greenhouse Gases

The numbers are in and in case there was any doubt, it looks like 2013 was another recordsetting year for greenhouse gases. The atmosphere is home to more warming gases than at any other point since industrialization. And carbon dioxide, the main culprit, is causing oceans to acidify at a rate unseen in at least 300 million years. The news comes c… Read More