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Brian Kahn

Brian Kahn

Editorial

Brian Kahn is a Web editor at Climate Central. He previously worked at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society and partnered with climate.gov to produce multimedia stories, manage social media campaigns and develop version 2.0 of climate.gov. His writing has also appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Grist, the Daily Kos, Justmeans and the Yale Forum on Climate Change in the Media. In previous lives, he led sleigh ride tours through a herd of 7,000 elk and guided tourists around the deepest lake in the U.S. He holds an M.A. in Climate and Society from Columbia University. 

Most Recent News Entries:

Ozone Hole Recovery Continues, Albeit a Little Slower

Ozone Hole Recovery Continues, Albeit a Little Slower

The ozone hole is a gash in the stratosphere, like a festering wound high above the earth’s surface. Scientists first diagnosed the problem in the mid-1980s and recommended a course of action to treat the problem. And today, NASA announced that recovery has continued, though slightly slower this year compared to years past.… Read More

Drying Amazon Could Be Major Carbon Concern

Drying Amazon Could Be Major Carbon Concern

The lungs of the planet are drying out, threatening to cause Earth to cough up some of its carbon reserves. The Amazon rainforest inhales massive amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping keep the globe’s carbon budget in balance (at least until human emissions started throwing that balance off). But since 2000, drier conditions are ca… Read More

One of Sao Paulo’s Biggest Reservoirs Is Nearly Dry

One of Sao Paulo’s Biggest Reservoirs Is Nearly Dry

Drought is taking its toll on the water system that quenches the thirst of Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paolo, to such a degree that it is visible to orbiting satellites. Sao Paolo is facing water rationing as the worst drought to hit the region in decades reduces reservoirs to muddy waters surrounded by cracked earth. The Cantareira Reservoir … Read More

El Niño Brings Floods, Risks — and Opportunities

El Niño Brings Floods, Risks — and Opportunities

The phantom El Niño continues to hold sway over the weather and climate world, in part because it has such a strong influence on weather patterns around the globe. But the weather it influences isn’t the end of the story or even the biggest point. What really matters is how those shifts can lead to flooding or drought. A new study looks at those d… Read More

Climate Change Takes Center Stage on Instagram

Climate Change Takes Center Stage on Instagram

Odorless, invisible gases cause the buildup of heat in the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans that lead to climate change. Those changes, such as shifts in rainfall patterns and the acidification of sea waters, are ones that happen in the long-term, relegating them to the background and making them hard to notice. The International Center for Photograph… Read More

Calif. Heads for Warmest Year As Drought Hangs On

Calif. Heads for Warmest Year As Drought Hangs On

Heavy precipitation fell across parts of the West in September, and while some locations saw top-10 wettest Septembers, much of the region is still mired in deep drought. Part of that is due to the excess heat that’s afflicted the region this year, including what’s been the warmest year to date in California according to U.S. temperature data relea… Read More

Pentagon: Climate Change Poses ‘Immediate Risks’

Pentagon: Climate Change Poses ‘Immediate Risks’

The Department of Defense sees climate change as an “immediate” risk and is taking steps to assess those risk and respond to them according to its newly unveiled Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap. The document, released on Monday, is an update to the agency’s first climate roadmap released in 2012. But rather than being a slight tweak, it provides… Read More

The $9.7 Trillion Problem: Cyclones and Climate Change

The $9.7 Trillion Problem: Cyclones and Climate Change

You can do a lot with $9.7 trillion: buy all the real estate in Manhattan 12 times over, purchase 22 carbon copies of Apple, or an absurd quantity of apples. It’s also the amount of money that tropical cyclones could cost the global economy over the next century, especially if climate projections of fewer but more intense cyclones are accurate. In… Read More

Greenland Sediment Sheds Light on Sea Level Rise

Greenland Sediment Sheds Light on Sea Level Rise

Greenland’s ice sheet is scraping rock bottom. No, it’s not hard up and in need of a loan. As ice moves from the center of the island to the sea, it’s scraping bedrock and transporting clues about just how fast the ice sheet is melting from the bottom up and what that means for sea level rise. The planet’s largest island is mostly covered in ice up… Read More

A Timeline of 2013 Extreme Weather and Global Warming

A Timeline of 2013 Extreme Weather and Global Warming

On Monday, the Bulletin of the American Meteolorogical Society released its annual look at extreme weather events and the role of climate change in causing them. More than 90 scientists from 14 countries compiled the report, which examined 16 separate events ranging from scorching heat to heavy rains to searing drought that occurred in 2013. Check … Read More

Gravity Shift Reveals West Antarctic Ice Loss

Gravity Shift Reveals West Antarctic Ice Loss

The West Antarctic Ice Sheet is headed toward “unstoppable” collapse according to recent studies. A new visual released by the European Space Agency show what the start of that collapse looks like both for the mass of the ice sheet and its signature on the planet’s gravitational field. We think of gravity as a constant, holding us in place on the p… Read More

U.S. International Aid Gets Climate Makeover

U.S. International Aid Gets Climate Makeover

The U.S. will change the way it approaches international development projects, helping communities adapt to the climatic changes that its fossil fuel burning has helped to create. But experts question whether the new initiative, announced Tuesday, will be enough to help Bangladeshis who are suffering worsening floods, Pacific Islanders whose lands … Read More

People’s Climate March Makes Front-Page News

People’s Climate March Makes Front-Page News

When 400,000 people hit the streets, perhaps it isn't surprising that it makes headline news. And that's just what happened on Sunday when the People's Climate March shut down thoroughfares around New York as part of the largest climate action in history. The march drew a wide cross-section of society from public figures like Ban Ki-moon, Al Gore a… Read More

El Niño is Kinda Sorta Maybe Here

El Niño is Kinda Sorta Maybe Here

El Niño watchers, rejoice (maybe). A weak El Niño has formed (sorta). On Tuesday, researchers at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society said a borderline El Niño is upon us, with the odds for further development increasing throughout the fall and winter. This El Niño has played a game of hide and seek since an El Niño Watch… Read More

Another Year, Another Record High for Greenhouse Gases

Another Year, Another Record High for Greenhouse Gases

The numbers are in and in case there was any doubt, it looks like 2013 was another recordsetting year for greenhouse gases. The atmosphere is home to more warming gases than at any other point since industrialization. And carbon dioxide, the main culprit, is causing oceans to acidify at a rate unseen in at least 300 million years. The news comes c… Read More

NASA Releases Blizzard of Precipitation Data

NASA Releases Blizzard of Precipitation Data

Have you been itching to see the most detailed collection of precipitation data ever pulled together? (Join the club) Well, you’re in luck. NASA has just released a vast trove of snow, rain, hail and more liquid measurements from a satellite launched earlier this year. In late February, NASA and an international cohort of space programs launched t… Read More

UN Highlights Climate Big Data Ahead of Summit

UN Highlights Climate Big Data Ahead of Summit

Data is buzzing around us all the time, and whether you realize it or not, you utilize data everyday, be it how much your daily cup of coffee costs or how long it takes to get to work. Now imagine doing that on a much bigger picture, organizing millions of pieces of information and making it useful. That’s exactly what scientists are up to when th… Read More

Climate Change Ups Odds of a Southwest Megadrought

Climate Change Ups Odds of a Southwest Megadrought

If you think the drought in California is bad, you ain’t seen nothing yet. New research indicates that climate change is giving a boost to the odds of long-term drought across the Southwest. The research, published Thursday in the Journal of Climate, puts the chances of a megadrought lasting 35 years or longer at up to 50 percent in the region. It… Read More

Crowdsourced Photos Provide Drought Snapshots

Crowdsourced Photos Provide Drought Snapshots

On May 24, a roiling dust cloud enveloped a desolate stretch of road in Prowers County, a rural county in southeast Colorado. The county and surrounding area had been deeply mired in drought for more than 2 years and the photo bore proof of just what drought looked like to its residents. The short note accompanying the photo added more context: “Ph… Read More

Visualize It: Old Weather Data Feeds New Climate Models

Visualize It: Old Weather Data Feeds New Climate Models

In the 1930s, there were no computers to run climate models or record weather observations. Instead, weather reports were written or typed on typewriters and forecast maps were drawn by hand. Those observations from the past contain valuable data that can help scientists better understand what the climate may look like in the future. But gathering… Read More

Here’s How Arctic Sea Ice Could Shrink Even More

Here’s How Arctic Sea Ice Could Shrink Even More

Climate change is the main driver behind receding Arctic sea ice. As summer ice shrinks further, it’s causing a host of other changes including the growth of large waves in the previously iced-over areas. Those waves could potentially hasten the demise of sea ice, leading to further changes in the fragile region. Changes brought on by global warmi… Read More

New CO2 Satellite Sends First Data Back to Earth

New CO2 Satellite Sends First Data Back to Earth

NASA’s new carbon dioxide-monitoring satellite just opened its eyes for the first time. Based on the initial data its sending back to Earth, it appears to have 20/20 vision and scientists will soon have plenty more data to analyze. The satellite, dubbed the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, or OCO-2, was launched last month as part of an effort to be… Read More

California Has Hottest Start to Year While Midwest Chills

California Has Hottest Start to Year While Midwest Chills

The heat records keep falling for California. The state has had its hottest first seven months of the year, crushing the previous mark. Neighboring states have also baked, though not quite at record levels, helping contribute to both the spread of drought and large wildfires. At the same time, cool weather had a number of Midwest states … Read More

Tornado Outbreaks Could Have a Climate Change Assist

Tornado Outbreaks Could Have a Climate Change Assist

Days with more tornadoes have become more common over the past 60 years, a trend that new research says could have a climate change connection. Understanding the connection between climate change and tornadoes, if any, is one of the most fraught areas of research. But a study released Wednesday posits that changes in heat and moisture content in t… Read More

Indigenous Groups Give Tropical Forests a Carbon Boost

Indigenous Groups Give Tropical Forests a Carbon Boost

Any path forward to reduce the globe’s carbon emissions goes through tropical forests. They serve as a sink to sequester human emissions, but deforestation risks sending those assets up in smoke. A recent report argues that to avoid that outcome, indigenous communities should be involved in forest management. Currently deforestation and land use c… Read More