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Brian Kahn

Brian Kahn

Editorial

Brian Kahn is a Senior Science Writer at Climate Central. He previously worked at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society and partnered with climate.gov to produce multimedia stories, manage social media campaigns and develop version 2.0 of climate.gov. His writing has also appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Grist, the Daily Kos, Justmeans and the Yale Forum on Climate Change in the Media. In previous lives, he led sleigh ride tours through a herd of 7,000 elk and guided tourists around the deepest lake in the U.S. He holds an M.A. in Climate and Society from Columbia University. 

Most Recent News Entries:

NASA Satellites Show Rain In Detail Like Never Before

NASA Satellites Show Rain In Detail Like Never Before

Few things on our planet connect us like precipitation. The storm that drops snow in the mountains of North Carolina one day can bring rain to the plains of Spain a week later. Yet there hasn't been a way to effectively monitor all the precipitation across the globe at once, let alone create a vertical profile from the clouds to the ground. All th… Read More

How Sahara Dust Sustains the Amazon Rainforest, in 3-D

How Sahara Dust Sustains the Amazon Rainforest, in 3-D

The Amazon rainforest exists in part due to an atmospheric pipeline of dust from the Sahara Desert. And if that pipeline were to dry up or be diverted, massive biological changes could occur across the jungle. New research published on Tuesday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters uses satellite data to create the first three-dimensional look… Read More

Here’s Where Ocean Acidification Will Hit the U.S. Hardest

Here’s Where Ocean Acidification Will Hit the U.S. Hardest

U.S. coastal communities better start preparing for ocean acidification now, especially if we want scallops, oysters and other shellfish to keep appearing on our dinnerplates. That’s the message of a new study that shows that shellfisheries across the U.S. are more vulnerable to climate change’s less considered counterpart than previously thought … Read More

Freeze Frame: Drone Captures Niagara Falls on Ice

Freeze Frame: Drone Captures Niagara Falls on Ice

It may feel too cold to even think of walking outside if you live on the East Coast. But you know what it's not too cold to do? Fly a drone over a mostly frozen Niagara Falls. That's exactly what Canadian videographer Brent Foster did on Friday. The results? Pretty spectacular. Raise your glass of hot chocolate (or iced tea if you're out West) to … Read More

Dry or Snowy? Winter Weather Splits the U.S.

Dry or Snowy? Winter Weather Splits the U.S.

Snow, snow, and more snow. That’s what’s been dominating the headlines the past few weeks. However, other than the most recent winter storm that cut across the middle of the country and cut up along the East Coast, it’s really only a small area of the U.S. that is getting pounded with such high amounts of snow — yes, that’s you coastal New England.… Read More

Ocean Acidification, Now Watchable in Real Time

Ocean Acidification, Now Watchable in Real Time

The depressing task of monitoring ocean acidification just got a little easier. A collection of scientists from Europe, the U.S. and India have developed a technique that could provide the first global and nearly real-time assessment of our rapidly acidifying seas.… Read More

Whiteout? Map Shows Last Time All 50 States Had Snow

Whiteout? Map Shows Last Time All 50 States Had Snow

Boston probably has enough snow for the rest of the country. But the last time all 50 states shared in Massachusetts' snowy fortune (or misfortune depending on how you feel about it) was five years ago this week.… Read More

Southwest, Central Plains Face ‘Unprecedented’ Drought

Southwest, Central Plains Face ‘Unprecedented’ Drought

Climate change is creating an “unprecedented” risk of severe drought in the Southwest and Central Plains. Rising temperatures and decreasing rainfall mean that future drought could be more extreme than any drought seen in at least the past 1,000 years and the effects could reverberate for urban dwellers and farmers across the regions. The 1930s Dus… Read More

Climate, Satellite Gaps are Risky Business for Feds

Climate, Satellite Gaps are Risky Business for Feds

In 2014, the federal government set aside $3.5 trillion in outlays for myriad programs. That’s a huge chunk of change exposed to a lot of risks, and according to a new report, two of the biggest threats are the impacts climate change and a looming weather satellite gap. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) released its biennial High Risk rep… Read More

Geoengineering Holds Promise; Solutions Not Ready

Geoengineering Holds Promise; Solutions Not Ready

Fifty years ago, the idea of reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the earth to address climate change officially entered the scientific and political vernacular. That concept has since been lumped under the banner of geoengineering with other hotly debated techniques that could help cool the planet. Just five years ago, President Obama’s scien… Read More

Everyday Climate Change, Now On Instagram

Everyday Climate Change, Now On Instagram

The #tbt hashtag might get a run for its money on Instagram: climate change has arrived on the popular social network. World class photographers are putting their pictures on display for a new account called Everyday Climate Change and amateurs can contribute. Instagram might seem like an odd place to show pictures of climate change every single … Read More

Climate Calculator Lets You Create a New World

Climate Calculator Lets You Create a New World

Have you always wanted to wield the power of a world leader but been unable find a suitable in? Well, your search is finally be over. The U.K. government has released its Global Calculator, a climate model hitherto only available to world governments to understand how their actions work in concert to reduce global warming. Now the public can crunch… Read More

A Country Divided by Seasons and Warming

A Country Divided by Seasons and Warming

The U.S. is no stranger to differences among its sometimes bickering states, so perhaps it’s no surprise that even global warming finds itself with some regional rivalries. A Climate Central analysis of regional and seasonal temperature differences in the contiguous U.S. since 1970 reveals a country divided along temperature lines, just as it is i… Read More

Thunderstorms Helping Bring Ozone Down to Earth

Thunderstorms Helping Bring Ozone Down to Earth

Ozone is a bit of a shape-shifting chemical. High in the stratosphere, ozone acts as an ultraviolet-blocking shield around Earth (which is why the ozone hole is such a problem). At ground level, it’s a pollutant that can cause serious respiratory problems. And if it finds its way into the troposphere — the lowest level of the atmosphere — ozone ser… Read More

Warming Ups Odds of Extreme La Niñas, Wild Weather

Warming Ups Odds of Extreme La Niñas, Wild Weather

La Niña events can drive weather patterns wild around the globe from helping exacerbate drought in West Africa and increase rainfall in areas as diverse as South Asia and the Pacific Northwest The more extreme the La Niña, which is characterized by a cooling of waters in the tropical Pacific, generally the more pronounced the impacts can be. New r… Read More

Climate Change Moves the Doomsday Clock

Climate Change Moves the Doomsday Clock

The end of civilization as we know it just got a little closer. According to an update to the Doomsday Clock, the world is now three minutes from midnight and one of the big reasons is the failure to reduce greenhouse emissions even in the face of climate change. The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists maintains the clock and resets the hands every … Read More

Watch 28 Years of Old Arctic Ice Disappear in One Minute

Watch 28 Years of Old Arctic Ice Disappear in One Minute

Arctic sea ice is pulling a Benjamin Button. It's been getting younger. But while that's a fate some would relish, it's not necessarily good news for ice as it's trip to the fountain of youth could speed its demise. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminstration has released an animation showing the decline of old sea ice since 1987, the first… Read More

Five Graphics That Show 2014’s Record Heat

Five Graphics That Show 2014’s Record Heat

Unless you've been living under a climate rock, you've probably heard that 2014 was the warmest year on record. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released data on Friday confirming last year took the crown from 2010 by about 0.1°F and running 1.24°F above the long-term average. What does the hottest year on record look l… Read More

U.S. Hot Streak Now Old Enough to Vote

U.S. Hot Streak Now Old Enough to Vote

In a year bookended by bitter cold snaps east of the Mississippi, it might come as a surprise to some that 2014 was actually quite a bit warmer than average in the U.S., making it the 18th year in a row with above-normal temperatures. Less of a surprise was the economic impact of the drought in the West, now on the brink of its fourth year. The dro… Read More

Polar Vortex Isn’t the Only Weather Game in Town

Polar Vortex Isn’t the Only Weather Game in Town

This first week of January might be giving you a strong feeling of deja vu. No, not just because you’re back at the gym as part of your New Year’s resolution or have sworn off champagne. Icy temperatures have descended once again on the Midwest and East Coast, almost exactly a year after the first popular mention of the weather pattern that spawned… Read More

Hot, Unfriendly Skies Could Alter Flights

Hot, Unfriendly Skies Could Alter Flights

You know those tube socks your grandmother air mails you on your birthday every year? Well, they could become another casualty of global warming. Or at least arrive a few days late. Hot weather is likely to increase the number of days with weight restrictions on cargo planes and even airliners, delaying gifts, air travel and slicing into airlines’… Read More

One for the Record Books: 2014 Officially Hottest Year

One for the Record Books: 2014 Officially Hottest Year

It’s official: 2014 has taken the title of hottest year on record. That ranking comes courtesy of data released Monday by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA), the first of four major global temperature recordkeepers to release their data for last year. The upward march of the world’s average temperature since 1891 is a trademark of human-influ… Read More

Climate Change’s Calling Card in 2014: Heat

Climate Change’s Calling Card in 2014: Heat

The lengthy streak of global warming and extreme heat continued in 2014 and it’s likely that the hits will just keep coming. This year is virtually guaranteed to go down as the world’s hottest year on record. But it’s not just one hot year we’re talking about. It’s a staggering list. Consider that the 15 hottest years on record have all come since … Read More

Seventeen U.S. Cities on Track for Hottest Year

Seventeen U.S. Cities on Track for Hottest Year

The globe is on track fo its warmest year on record. But global average temperature watchers won't be the only ones fêting record heat when the clock strikes midnight on Wednesday. A number of U.S. urban areas will also join in the 2014 warm record-setting festivities while not a single major urban area will be raising a glass to record cold. In fa… Read More

The Year’s 7 Most Telling Images From Space

The Year’s 7 Most Telling Images From Space

What’s better than a year-end list? A year-end list . . . from space. As of July this year, there are 1,235 satellites in operation by countries around the world tracking everything from carbon dioxide to the weather. Throw in the International Space Station and you’ve got one heck of an Earth-observing system circling this fair planet. The image… Read More