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Bobby Magill

Bobby Magill

Editorial

Bobby Magill is a Senior Science Writer at Climate Central, focusing on energy and climate change. Prior to joining Climate Central, Bobby covered Western energy and environmental issues as a freelance writer for Popular Mechanics and as an award-winning reporter for the Fort Collins Coloradoan newspaper in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the Daily Sentinel newspaper in Grand Junction, Colorado. His work has also appeared in USA Today, High Country News, NewWest.net and other publications. His coverage of oil and gas drilling and fracking at the Coloradoan earned a commendation from the Columbia Journalism Review as a "model for other reporters on this beat in the West and beyond." Born and raised in Charleston, S.C., Bobby was a wilderness guide in Colorado and New Mexico and holds a B.A. in Communications with a specialization in Mass Media from the College of Charleston. He lives in New York City. 

Most Recent News Entries:

U.S. Leads Globe in Oil Production for Third Year

U.S. Leads Globe in Oil Production for Third Year

The U.S. led the world last year in producing both oil and gas, federal government estimates published Monday show, even as the country committed to cutting greenhouse gas emissions. … Read More

Power Plant Emissions Fall to Lowest Level in Decades

Power Plant Emissions Fall to Lowest Level in Decades

Carbon dioxide emissions from electric power plants have fallen to their lowest level in decades, and that trend could help states meet their emissions goals under the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan if it survives court challenges, according to new U.S. Energy Information Administration data and a New York University analysis. Carbon … Read More

Young Forests Can Store ‘Enormous’ Amounts of Carbon

Young Forests Can Store ‘Enormous’ Amounts of Carbon

Woodland areas that regrow after forest fires, logging operations or other disturbances can sequester huge amounts of carbon dioxide and they play an unexpectedly valuable role in mitigating climate change, according to a study by 60 scientists from across the globe. The research, published Friday in the journal Science Advances, is the first to … Read More

EPA Moves to Regulate Oil and Gas Methane Emissions

EPA Moves to Regulate Oil and Gas Methane Emissions

The Obama administration announced new rules on Thursday aimed at cutting methane emissions from new oil and gas wells and fracking operations. The rules also will require energy companies to provide pollution information to the Environmental Protection Agency so it can regulate methane emissions from existing oil and gas wells. Methane warms the … Read More

Global 2040 Forecast Sees Only Slight Fall in Fossil Fuels

Global 2040 Forecast Sees Only Slight Fall in Fossil Fuels

Despite the urgency to cut greenhouse gas emissions as climate change bears down on the globe, fossil fuel use is not likely to change much in the coming decades. Though renewable energy will grow quickly though 2040, gasoline and diesel will still move most of the world’s vehicles, and coal will still be the largest single source of carbon … Read More

Could Baby Steps Be the Best Global Climate Strategy?

Could Baby Steps Be the Best Global Climate Strategy?

Could baby steps be the best way to make international progress on slashing greenhouse gas emissions instead of trying to strike a bold and grand bargain among world powers? A paper published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change concludes that the answer to that questions is: Yes. So far, international cooperation on climate change has come… Read More

Fracking Hits Milestone as Natural Gas Use Rises in U.S.

Fracking Hits Milestone as Natural Gas Use Rises in U.S.

More natural gas in the U.S. is coming from wells that have been hydraulically fractured than ever before, and fracking’s share of the country’s gas supply is continuing to rise, according to new data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. At the same time, the fracking boom in the U.S. has led to a major boost in natural gas consumption… Read More

Hurricanes Boost Carbon Storage in Southeastern Forests

Hurricanes Boost Carbon Storage in Southeastern Forests

Hurricanes hitting the Southeast coast can supercharge the region’s forests, spurring them to store more than 100 times the carbon released annually by all vehicles in the U.S., Duke University researchers have found. Rainfall associated with hurricanes acts as fuel for photosynthesis, drastically increasing trees’ carbon absorption rates… Read More

Paris Pact Could Benefit From Halt of Fossil Fuel Leases

Paris Pact Could Benefit From Halt of Fossil Fuel Leases

Phasing out federal coal, oil and gas leasing on public lands in the U.S. could make a small but significant contribution toward the international goal of keeping global warming to 2°C (3.6°F), according to a paper published Tuesday by the Stockholm Environment Institute. Shutting down all federal oil, gas and coal leasing would lead to a … Read More

Satellite Shows U.S. Has the Most Gas Flares in the World

Satellite Shows U.S. Has the Most Gas Flares in the World

Drive through many oil and gas fields in the U.S. and one thing stands out above the pumpjacks and storage tanks, especially at night — steadily flickering flames. Those flames are known as gas flares, which burn off excess natural gas from crude oil and natural gas wells across the globe. Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric … Read More

Strong El Niño Helped Lower U.S. Heating Costs

Strong El Niño Helped Lower U.S. Heating Costs

Was your heating bill a bit friendlier to your wallet this winter? If so, there’s a good chance you can thank El Niño. The exceptionally strong El Niño in the Pacific has been driving chaotic weather across the globe for months, but it also contributed to a mild winter in the U.S., which was about 15 percent warmer than the winter of 2014-2015.… Read More

2016 Election Critical to Success of Paris Climate Pact

2016 Election Critical to Success of Paris Climate Pact

The 2016 presidential election is likely to be enormously consequential to the success of the Paris climate agreement, due to be signed Friday at the United Nations, and the ability of the United States to lead the world in reducing greenhouse gas emissions to keep global warming to “well below” 2°C (3.6°F).… Read More

Studies Show Link Between Red Meat and Climate Change

Studies Show Link Between Red Meat and Climate Change

Shifting diets away from meat could slash in half per capita greenhouse gas emissions related to eating habits worldwide and ward off additional deforestation — a major contributor to climate change, according to new scientific findings published this week. The consequences of land use change stemming from expanding agricultural production were … Read More

Rooftops in Cloudy Places Could Be Solar Gold Mines

Rooftops in Cloudy Places Could Be Solar Gold Mines

Nestled on the eastern shore of Lake Erie, Buffalo is considered one of the cloudiest, dreariest cities in the U.S. — not exactly the first place many people consider prime real estate for solar power development. But Buffalonians have good reason to be excited about rooftop solar, and not just because a solar panel factory is creating jobs… Read More

Coal Decline Pushes Peabody Energy Into Bankruptcy

Coal Decline Pushes Peabody Energy Into Bankruptcy

Peabody Energy, the world’s largest coal producer, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Wednesday, the latest casualty in an industry that has been shaken by the recent shale gas boom, climate change policy and economics that greatly disfavor coal production. In a statement, Peabody Energy said that it will operate as usual as it reorganizes and sells… Read More

The Suit Against the Clean Power Plan, Explained

The Suit Against the Clean Power Plan, Explained

The Clean Power Plan, the Obama administration’s most sweeping climate change policy, is being challenged in federal appeals court and its future is expected to hinge on the outcome of at least one court decision — and possibly two — over the next year. The merits of the lawsuit are set to be argued June 2 before the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals … Read More

Farmland Could Play Key Role in Tackling Climate Change

Farmland Could Play Key Role in Tackling Climate Change

The earth’s soil stores a lot of carbon from the atmosphere, and managing it with the climate in mind may be an important part of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to curb global warming, according to a paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature. “Climate-smart” soil management, primarily on land used for agriculture, can be part of an … Read More

White House: Climate Change Poses Urgent Health Risk

White House: Climate Change Poses Urgent Health Risk

Climate change is a major threat to human health, with extreme heat likely to kill 27,000 Americans annually by 2100, according to a report released Monday by the White House. The report, by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, outlines numerous ways global warming could devastate public health in the U.S. this century. Global warming will… Read More

Nation’s Next Offshore Wind Farm Eyed For Virginia Coast

Nation’s Next Offshore Wind Farm Eyed For Virginia Coast

America’s next experiment in offshore wind energy has been given the green light in Virginia, and in just a few years, wind turbines could be twirling in two places in the open waters of the U.S. East Coast. The federal government last week approved a research project off the coast of Virginia that is expected to help demonstrate the viability of … Read More

Study Questions China’s CO2 Emissions Dip

Study Questions China’s CO2 Emissions Dip

China’s greenhouse gas emissions are on a downward trajectory, but its emissions may not have fallen quite as much over the past two years as the Chinese government and the International Energy Agency have suggested. That’s the conclusion of a new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change, which says China’s emissions may have actually … Read More

If a Power Plant Is Built in U.S., It’s Likely to be Renewable

If a Power Plant Is Built in U.S., It’s Likely to be Renewable

If a new electric power plant is built in the U.S. these days, chances are it’s renewable — either wind or solar. That’s the gist of a report the U.S. Department of Energy released this week showing that, together, wind and solar accounted for nearly two-thirds of all new electric power plants built in 2015. … Read More

Renewable Energy Investments Set a Record in 2015

Renewable Energy Investments Set a Record in 2015

Global investments in renewable energy, including wind and solar, hit a world record in 2015. It’s not enough, however, to put the world on track to meet Paris climate goals. The world collectively spent nearly $286 billion on renewable energy development in 2015. The investment comes following an unprecedented worldwide boom in renewables in 2014 … Read More

Healthy Diet May Reduce Gas; Greenhouse Gas, That Is

Healthy Diet May Reduce Gas; Greenhouse Gas, That Is

If people in developed countries such as the U.S. were to eat less red meat and move steadily toward a vegetarian or vegan diet, they could live longer while helping to slash greenhouse gas emissions from food production by between 29 and 70 percent by 2050, according to the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.… Read More

Natural Gas Poised to Surpass Coal For Electricity in U.S.

Natural Gas Poised to Surpass Coal For Electricity in U.S.

This year is expected to be the first in U.S. history that more electricity will be generated from natural gas than coal, a new analysis has found, marking another milestone in the decline of America’s largest single source of greenhouse gas emissions. Coal used to generate electricity represents about 30 percent of U.S. emissions driving … Read More

Waters Off New York Opened For Offshore Wind Farm

Waters Off New York Opened For Offshore Wind Farm

Wind turbines could be twirling off the coast of Long Island and New York City sometime in the next few years now that the Obama administration has set aside a new offshore wind farm development area. The U.S. Department of Interior has created an 81,130 acre “wind energy area” in the open Atlantic about 11 miles south of Long Island. The move is … Read More