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Bobby Magill

Bobby Magill

Editorial

Bobby Magill is a Senior Science Writer at Climate Central, focusing on energy and climate change. Prior to joining Climate Central, Bobby covered Western energy and environmental issues as a freelance writer for Popular Mechanics and as an award-winning reporter for the Fort Collins Coloradoan newspaper in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the Daily Sentinel newspaper in Grand Junction, Colorado. His work has also appeared in USA Today, High Country News, NewWest.net and other publications. His coverage of oil and gas drilling and fracking at the Coloradoan earned a commendation from the Columbia Journalism Review as a "model for other reporters on this beat in the West and beyond." Born and raised in Charleston, S.C., Bobby was a wilderness guide in Colorado and New Mexico and holds a B.A. in Communications with a specialization in Mass Media from the College of Charleston. He lives in New York City. 

Most Recent News Entries:

Natural Gas Emissions to Surpass Those of Coal in 2016

Natural Gas Emissions to Surpass Those of Coal in 2016

The U.S. is expected to reach a major carbon emissions milestone this year: For the first time, carbon dioxide emissions from burning natural gas for electricity in the U.S. are set to surpass those from burning coal — the globe’s chief climate polluter. Emissions from burning natural gas are expected to be 10 percent greater than those from coal … Read More

Michigan Scientists See Urgency for Negative Emissions

Michigan Scientists See Urgency for Negative Emissions

Beyond Carbon Neutral at the University of Michigan is one of several university programs across the country investigating potential ways of taking large-scale negative emissions out of the theoretical realm and into the real.… Read More

Artificial Leaf Turns CO2 Emissions Into Fuel

Artificial Leaf Turns CO2 Emissions Into Fuel

If humans could invent a leaf-like solar cell that could turn carbon dioxide pollution from the atmosphere into fuel for electric power plants, it could help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and cut emissions that contribute to global warming. That’s the goal of a new artificial leaf that a team of researchers led by the University of … Read More

Climate Change’s Fingerprints All Over California Wildfires

Climate Change’s Fingerprints All Over California Wildfires

Reports this week from the front lines of the Sand Fire in Southern California painted the scene as apocalyptic. The drought-fueled blaze was explosive, fast-moving and devastating, burning through 38,000 acres in the Santa Clarita Valley and forcing the evacuation of more than 10,000 homes. If the state’s wildfire season holds true to forecasts… Read More

Scientists Urge Obama to End Federal Coal Leasing

Scientists Urge Obama to End Federal Coal Leasing

Citing coal’s effect on climate change, a group of more than 65 prominent scientists is urging the Obama administration to end coal leasing on federal public lands by making permanent a moratorium the government placed on leasing in January. In a letter sent to the administration Wednesday, the scientists said that unless coal mining is stopped … Read More

EPA Finding Clears Way for Limit on Aircraft Emissions

EPA Finding Clears Way for Limit on Aircraft Emissions

The Environmental Protection Agency on Monday declared that jet engine exhaust endangers public health by contributing to climate change, a key milestone as it works to develop regulations that will cut carbon emissions from commercial aircraft. Large commercial jets account for 11 percent of all emissions from the global transportation sector… Read More

Global Economy Becoming Less Energy Intense

Global Economy Becoming Less Energy Intense

The amount of coal, oil, gas and renewable energy used by the global economy is falling quickly, a clear sign that economic growth is having less of an impact on climate change than in the past, according to new data from the U.S. Department of Energy. The measure of the amount of energy that is used per unit of gross domestic product is known as … Read More

Global Climate Spending Focusing on Forest Protection

Global Climate Spending Focusing on Forest Protection

Forests straddling the equator are critical to a stable climate because they store vast amounts of carbon, and a new study finds that the U.S. and four other developed countries are spending billions of dollars to keep those forests intact. An analysis of how the U.S., Japan, Germany, France and Norway have donated money to climate change … Read More

Efficiency, Clean Energy Put Dent in CO2 Emissions

Efficiency, Clean Energy Put Dent in CO2 Emissions

Americans are using less electricity as buildings become more energy-efficient and industrial power demand weakens, and a new report says that is leading to three trends: Declining carbon dioxide emissions, low electric power prices and the decline of coal, which has until recently been the primary fuel used to produce electricity. Some of the … Read More

Negative Emissions Key to Meeting 2°C Threshold

Negative Emissions Key to Meeting 2°C Threshold

Humans will have to not only stop emitting greenhouse gases by 2085, but also develop technology that will result in negative emissions — the removal of 15 billion tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere each year by the end of the century — in order to prevent global warming from exceeding 2°C (3.6°F), according to a new study. … Read More

Alberta Wildfires Costliest Disaster in Canadian History

Alberta Wildfires Costliest Disaster in Canadian History

The Fort McMurray wildfire, driven by drought and climate change, was the costliest natural disaster in Canadian history, ringing up $3.58 billion in losses, according to the Insurance Bureau of Canada. The wildfire, which ignited May 1 in eastern Alberta and was brought under control on July 5, forced Canada’s largest-ever evacuation. It scorched… Read More

Court Decision on Climate Plan Jolts Carbon Prices

Court Decision on Climate Plan Jolts Carbon Prices

A temporary halt to the federal government’s plan to cut electric power plant emissions has caused carbon prices in the Northeast’s only cap-and-trade program to plummet, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. Carbon prices in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, have fallen 40 percent since the Supreme Court’s decision in … Read More

Here’s What Your July 4 Road Trip Means for the Climate

Here’s What Your July 4 Road Trip Means for the Climate

When an expected record-breaking 36 million Americans take their holiday road trips this Fourth of July weekend, they’ll be part of what is quickly becoming our nation’s biggest source of carbon dioxide emissions — transportation. This winter, for the first time since 1979, carbon dioxide emissions from cars, trucks and SUVs surpassed the carbon … Read More

Mexico, Canada, U.S. to Make Clean Power Pledge

Mexico, Canada, U.S. to Make Clean Power Pledge

The U.S., Mexico and Canada are expected to pledge Wednesday to collectively generate 50 percent of their electricity from zero-carbon sources by 2025, according to White House officials. The agreement is expected to be struck at the North American Leaders’ Summit in Ottawa. It means that when all the electricity generated in the three countries … Read More

‘Water Windfall’ Found in Drought-Stricken California

‘Water Windfall’ Found in Drought-Stricken California

California’s Central Valley has three times more freshwater in underground aquifers than previously thought, drinking water that could help the state weather future drought and fortify itself against a changing climate, according to a new Stanford University study. But tapping that water, locked thousands of feet beneath the ground, will be … Read More

Wind at China’s Back to Amp Up Its Renewables

Wind at China’s Back to Amp Up Its Renewables

China can tap just 10 percent of its wind resources to supply more than a quarter of its electricity by 2030, significantly boosting the global transition to renewable energy, according to an MIT study.… Read More

Extreme Oil Prices May Be Costly to the Climate

Extreme Oil Prices May Be Costly to the Climate

When oil and gas prices go to extremes, such as when they crashed two years ago, scientists begin to look for answers about what those prices mean for climate change — especially when cheap oil encourages people to guzzle more gasoline in less fuel-efficient vehicles. A new study shows that if oil and gas prices remain at either extreme — very … Read More

Scientists Urge Obama to Halt Oil Leasing in the Arctic

Scientists Urge Obama to Halt Oil Leasing in the Arctic

In a letter being delivered to the White House on Thursday, nearly 400 scientists from more than a dozen countries are urging President Obama to stop future oil and gas drilling in the Arctic Ocean because of the significant environmental and climate risks associated with further fossil fuels exploration there. “No new oil and gas leasing or … Read More

Melting Arctic Could Supercharge Climate Feedback Loop

Melting Arctic Could Supercharge Climate Feedback Loop

As global warming heats the Arctic, carbon dioxide emissions from melting permafrost could play a bigger role in worsening climate change than previously thought, according to a new study. Scientists have long considered methane emissions to be the biggest climate threat posed by thawing permafrost. Methane is more potent than carbon dioxide in … Read More

Wildfires Disrupt Oil Sands, Exposing Climate Risk

Wildfires Disrupt Oil Sands, Exposing Climate Risk

While importing oil from Canada has been controversial in the U.S., the devastating wildfires in Fort McMurray have served to underscore a larger issue: Natural disasters exacerbated by climate change can threaten major natural resources. The wildfires in Alberta forced tar sands production to be cut by about a third, or 800,000 barrels per day in… Read More

Scientists Turn Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Stone

Scientists Turn Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Stone

For the first time, carbon dioxide emissions from an electric power plant have been captured, pumped underground and solidified — the first step toward safe carbon capture and storage, according to a paper published Thursday in the journal Science. “This opens another door for getting rid of carbon dioxide or storing carbon dioxide in the … Read More

Arctic Sea Ice Breaks May Record . . . By A Lot

Arctic Sea Ice Breaks May Record . . . By A Lot

Arctic sea ice shrank to its fourth-lowest level in 50 years last month, setting a record low for the month of May and setting up conditions for what could become the smallest Arctic ice extent in history, according to National Snow and Ice Data Center data released Tuesday. “We didn’t just break the old May record, we’re way below the previous on… Read More

Scientists Seek a New Measure for Methane. Here’s Why.

Scientists Seek a New Measure for Methane. Here’s Why.

There may be a significant problem with the measuring stick scientists use to account for how much methane is affecting climate change, according to a recent study led by researchers at Oxford University. The long-term effect of methane emissions might appear to be a lot greater than it really is when compared to carbon dioxide in terms of both… Read More

Warming Could Boost Carbon Storage in Alaska Forests

Warming Could Boost Carbon Storage in Alaska Forests

Climate change may dramatically increase carbon storage in Alaska’s temperate forests, possibly offsetting the climate impacts of melting permafrost and wildfires, new research from the U.S. Geological Survey shows. But there’s an asterisk: the study’s authors said their projections could be skewed by a lack of data on methane emissions from lakes… Read More

Easing Drought Boosts California Hydropower, For Now

Easing Drought Boosts California Hydropower, For Now

The easing of California’s drought has boosted the state’s early spring hydropower generation to its highest level since 2011, helping it to recover from a 15-year low reached last year. But hydroelectricity production is not expected to improve much overall this year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The West’s four-year … Read More

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With Climate Change, More Rain or Snow? A Climate Central analysis found an increase in the percentage of winter precipitation falling as rain in many western states.

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