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Andrew Freedman

Andrew Freedman

Editorial

Andrew Freedman is a senior science writer for Climate Central, focusing on coverage of extreme weather and climate change. Prior to working with Climate Central, Freedman was a reporter for Congressional Quarterly and Greenwire/E&E Daily. His work has also appeared in the Washington Post and online at The Weather Channel Interactive and washingtonpost.com, where he wrote a weekly climate science column for the "Capital Weather Gang" blog. He has represented Climate Central in media appearances with Sky News, CBC Radio, NPR, Huffington Post Live, Sirius XM Radio, and other national and international outlets. He holds a Masters in Climate and Society from Columbia University and a Masters in Law and Diplomacy from The Fletcher School at Tufts University.

Most Recent News Entries:

Study Sounds ‘El Niño Alarm’ For Late This Year

Study Sounds ‘El Niño Alarm’ For Late This Year

Although they occur in the equatorial tropical Pacific Ocean, the effects of El Niño events can reverberate around the globe, wreaking havoc with typical weather patterns. El Niños can cause California to be pummeled by Pacific storm systems, for example, while leaving eastern Australia at greater risk of drought.… Read More

‘Atmospheric River’ May Put a Dent in California Drought

‘Atmospheric River’ May Put a Dent in California Drought

The most severely dry soils in California are in Central and Northern California, which means the storms hitting during the next few days are likely to target the areas where precipitation is most sorely needed, Murphy said. If the drought continues through the rest of the wet season, it could reverberate throughout the U.S. economy, considering th… Read More

Time is Running Out for California Drought Relief

Time is Running Out for California Drought Relief

More than halfway through the state's wet season and the Sierra Nevada snowcap all but non-existent, California's prospects for making up its precipitation deficit are slim. The snowcap will yield precious little water and the state would need to get about a foot or more of rain in the next two months to make up the difference. Forecasts are not of… Read More