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Andrea Thompson

Andrea Thompson

Editorial

Andrea Thompson is a Senior Science Writer at Climate Central, focusing on extreme weather and climate change. Previously, Andrea was a writer and reporter for Live Science and Space.com, reporting on climate change, weather and other science-related topics. She graduated from Georgia Tech with a B.S. in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences in 2004 and a Master's in the same subject in 2006. She attended the Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program at New York University and graduated with a Master of Arts in 2006.

Most Recent News Entries:

Record-Warm Autumn Solidifies 2nd-Hottest Year for U.S.

Record-Warm Autumn Solidifies 2nd-Hottest Year for U.S.

It's almost certain that 2016 will be the second-hottest year on record for the contiguous U.S., with new data showing that November was the second warmest on record for the Lower 48, capping off a record-hot autumn (for the second year in a row). Through November, 2016 as a whole has been the second hottest in 122 years of record keeping, the … Read More

Arctic Sea Ice Sees Strange Cold Season Retreat

Arctic Sea Ice Sees Strange Cold Season Retreat

The Arctic is missing a chunk of sea ice the size of Mexico. While fall ushers in the season of sea ice growth, November saw a brief retreat that was virtually unprecedented in nearly 40 years of satellite records, according to data released Tuesday by the National Snow and Ice Data Center. That dip helped November set a record low for sea ice are… Read More

Warming U.S. Could See Extreme Rains Increase Fivefold

Warming U.S. Could See Extreme Rains Increase Fivefold

When the skies open up and deluge an area, the results can be catastrophic, with roads washed out and homes destroyed by the resulting flash floods. Such extreme downpours are already occurring more often across the U.S., but a new study finds that as global temperatures rise, storms could dump considerably more rain and skyrocket in frequency. The… Read More

Extreme Tornado Outbreaks Are Becoming More Extreme

Extreme Tornado Outbreaks Are Becoming More Extreme

Outbreaks of tornadoes — where multiple tornadoes form over an area in just a few hours or days — are responsible for most of the devastating destruction caused by severe weather, and a new analysis has reached a worrying conclusion about the worst of these outbreaks. Outbreaks with many tornadoes are becoming more extreme, particularly the … Read More

Odd Rifts in Antarctic Ice Could Mean ‘Sayonara, Glacier’

Odd Rifts in Antarctic Ice Could Mean ‘Sayonara, Glacier’

In August of 2015, a large iceberg broke off from the floating section of Antarctica’s massive Pine Island Glacier. While such an event is part of the natural life cycle of glaciers, this one was precipitated by an unusual rift in the middle of the ice that could point to a new mechanism for the collapse of this and potentially other glaciers … Read More

What a Warmer Future Means for Southeastern Wildfires

What a Warmer Future Means for Southeastern Wildfires

When Jeff Prestemon stepped outside his home near Raleigh, N.C., last Friday around 9 a.m., the skies were clear, the air “perfectly breathable.” But just an hour-and-a-half later, the winds had shifted, drawing with them the smoke from regional wildfires. “It was putrid,” Prestemon, a research forester with the U.S. Forest Service, said. “It stung… Read More

U.S. Record Highs Will Far Outpace Lows With Warming

U.S. Record Highs Will Far Outpace Lows With Warming

Over the first decade of this century, record high daily temperatures in the U.S. were registered twice as often as record lows, a clear sign of global warming. If emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases continue on their current track, that ratio could become even more skewed, potentially reaching 15-to-1 by midcentury, a new study finds. The… Read More

The March Continues for 2016 to be Record Hot

The March Continues for 2016 to be Record Hot

Global temperatures have begun to retreat from their El Niño-fueled peak earlier in the year, but the excess heat trapped by greenhouse gases is keeping them well above average and 2016 is likely to become the hottest year on record. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its temperature data through the end of October on… Read More

Second-Warmest October Cements Hottest Year

Second-Warmest October Cements Hottest Year

October was the second hottest on record for the planet, NASA data released Tuesday shows. The month was the latest in a string of record- and near record-warm months that will see 2016 easily take the title of hottest year in the books. While an exceptionally strong El Niño helped to boost temperatures early in the year, most of the excess heat… Read More

2016 Will Be Hottest Year, UN Climate Meeting Told

2016 Will Be Hottest Year, UN Climate Meeting Told

2016 is set to be the hottest year on record by a significant margin, with temperatures that are 2.2˚F (1.2˚C) above pre-industrial times, the World Meteorological Organization told diplomats gathered in Marrakech, Morocco, to discuss international action to limit global warming to less than 2˚C by the end of the century. “Another year. Another… Read More

La Niña Arrives, Likely to Exacerbate Southern Drought

La Niña Arrives, Likely to Exacerbate Southern Drought

La Niña is here. But unlike the El Niño that preceded it, this climate event is expected to be weak and short-lived, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday. But that doesn’t mean the U.S. won’t see some of the typical impacts of a La Niña; forecasters expect it to tilt the odds in favor of warmer, drier conditions across… Read More

Climate Experts Weigh in on Trump’s Election Win

Climate Experts Weigh in on Trump’s Election Win

The election of Donald Trump as the nation’s next president spurred celebration in some quarters and dismay in others, including among those concerned about the steady warming of the planet. The unrestrained emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases have altered the Earth’s climate, raising sea levels, impacting ecosystems, and increasingly the… Read More

Toasty October Keeps U.S. on Track for 2nd-Hottest Year

Toasty October Keeps U.S. on Track for 2nd-Hottest Year

The U.S. is still cruising toward its second-hottest year on record going back more than 120 years, with every state in the Lower 48, as well as Alaska, recording well above-average temperatures through October. This October was the third warmest on record, and 37 states had one of their five warmest January-October periods in the books, the… Read More

Here’s How Much CO2 Will Make the Arctic Ice-Free

Here’s How Much CO2 Will Make the Arctic Ice-Free

For every round-trip transatlantic flight or just two months of a home’s electricity use, 30 square feet of Arctic sea ice is lost, according to a new study that lays out in the simplest possible terms the relationship between heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions and the precipitous decline of sea ice. The further accumulation of 1,000 gigatons… Read More

Drought, Climate Impact Fall Foliage in Complex Ways

Drought, Climate Impact Fall Foliage in Complex Ways

The riot of colors that erupts on trees each fall drives billions of dollars in tourism and remains a key way for people to connect with nature. But that simple transition from summer’s lush greens to fall’s brilliant reds, oranges and yellows can be impacted in surprisingly complex ways by weather and climate, and those effects may be even more… Read More

Warm Ocean Water Takes Toll on Antarctica’s Glaciers

Warm Ocean Water Takes Toll on Antarctica’s Glaciers

It has become increasingly clear in recent years that ocean waters are eating away at the undersides of the ice shelves that fringe Antarctica and buttress its many glaciers. A new study released Tuesday has found that hundreds of feet of ice have been lost from the bottoms of a few of these ice shelves and glaciers in a region of the continent… Read More

Winter Drought Forecast for Much of U.S.

Winter Drought Forecast for Much of U.S.

While the weather catchphrase of recent winters was the shiver-inducing polar vortex, the buzzword for this winter in the U.S. will be drought. Significant droughts are already in place over nearly 45 percent of the contiguous U.S., with hotspots in California — where the drought is in its sixth year — the Southeast and Northeast. With the renewed… Read More

Rift Speeds Up Across Antarctic Ice Shelf

Rift Speeds Up Across Antarctic Ice Shelf

As the sun reemerged over the Antarctic horizon in August after the long, dark austral winter, satellites could once again peer at a rift that has been wending its way across the white expanse of the Larsen C Ice Shelf on the eastern side of the Antarctic Peninsula. To the surprise of scientists, satellite images revealed that the fissure had … Read More

Streak of Record-Hot Temps Adds Another Month

Streak of Record-Hot Temps Adds Another Month

The unprecedented streak of record-hot months that the world has experienced over more than a year just tacked on one more month: Data released Tuesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration showed last month was easily the hottest August on record. That makes 16 straight record-hot months, unparalleled in NOAA’s 137 years of record… Read More

August Ties July as Hottest Month Ever on Record

August Ties July as Hottest Month Ever on Record

In what has become a common refrain this year, last month ranked as the hottest August on record, according to NASA data released Monday. Not only that, but the month tied July as the hottest month the world has seen in the last 136 years. August came in at 1.76˚F (0.98˚C) above the average from 1951-1980, 0.16C above August 2014, the previous… Read More

5th Hottest U.S. Summer Saw Record Northeast Heat

5th Hottest U.S. Summer Saw Record Northeast Heat

The dog days of summer were especially scorching across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic last month, with eight states in those regions recording their hottest August in 122 years. Two of those — Connecticut and Rhode Island — also had record-warm summers, according to data released Thursday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration… Read More

Landfalling Typhoons Have Become More Intense

Landfalling Typhoons Have Become More Intense

In the Northwest Pacific, already a hotspot for tropical cyclones, the storms that strike East and Southeast Asia have been intensifying more than those that stay out at sea over the last four decades, a new study finds. The proportion of landfalling storms that reach Category 4 or 5 strength — the storms that wreak the most damage, as recent… Read More

Despite Major Melt, Arctic Sea Ice Will Miss Record Low

Despite Major Melt, Arctic Sea Ice Will Miss Record Low

As the sun begins its seasonal descent in the Arctic sky and temperatures drop, the summer melt of sea ice is slowing down. In the next few weeks, the span of the Arctic Ocean covered by ice will reach its annual low. But despite beginning the summer at unprecedentedly low levels, this year’s minimum won’t break the stunning record of 2012, expert… Read More

Climate Change Could Put Tiny Krill at Big Risk

Climate Change Could Put Tiny Krill at Big Risk

They may be small, but krill — tiny, shrimp-like creatures — play a big role in the Antarctic food chain. As climate change warms the Southern Ocean and alters sea ice patterns, though, the area of Antarctic water suitable for krill to hatch and grow could drop precipitously, a new study finds. Most Antarctic krill are found in an area from the … Read More

Study Suggests Earlier Onset of Human-Driven Warming

Study Suggests Earlier Onset of Human-Driven Warming

To fully understand the warming of the planet that is being driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases, scientists need to examine the history of climate changes on Earth. Hampering this effort is the fact that direct measurements of temperature and other climate data only go back to about the late 19th century. But by using records kept by the… Read More