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Andrea Thompson

Andrea Thompson

Editorial

Andrea Thompson is a Senior Science Writer at Climate Central, focusing on extreme weather and climate change. Previously, Andrea was a writer and reporter for Live Science and Space.com, reporting on climate change, weather and other science-related topics. She graduated from Georgia Tech with a B.S. in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences in 2004 and a Master's in the same subject in 2006. She attended the Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program at New York University and graduated with a Master of Arts in 2006.

Most Recent News Entries:

Why Do We Care So Much About El Niño?

Why Do We Care So Much About El Niño?

Every month since March, when the first El Niño Watch was issued, forecasters, government officials around the world, and yes, even those in the media, have been watching with bated breath to see whether various climate agencies would officially pronounce the arrival of that infamous climate phenomenon. So far, no clear-cut El Niño has been… Read More

Picture This: Twin Waterspouts and Amazing Aurora

Picture This: Twin Waterspouts and Amazing Aurora

The big weather story this week was of course the unseasonably cool air that washed over much of the eastern half of the U.S. this week (whether or not it was related to the polar vortex). But cold air is kind of hard to photograph, so we’ve rounded up some other stunning shots taken of various weather phenomena this week. Enjoy! The other big… Read More

What’s Behind Super Typhoon’s Rapid Intensification?

What’s Behind Super Typhoon’s Rapid Intensification?

Typhoon Rammasun first tore across the Philippines earlier this week, dumping up to 13 inches of rain in some spots and causing the deaths of at least 40 people. It then emerged over the South China Sea and underwent a rapid re-intensification that boosted it to Super Typhoon status before it hit China’s Hainan Island, becoming the most intense… Read More

Six Months In and Sizzling California Sets Record

Six Months In and Sizzling California Sets Record

The record exemplifies a temperature pattern that has held across the country for much of the year, with above-average temperatures in the West and below average in the East. The pattern has kept monthly average temperatures for the entire U.S. -- as well as the average temperature for the year-to-date -- in the middle of the pack record-wise, but … Read More

Polar Vortex or Not, Cooler Temps Invade Eastern U.S.

Polar Vortex or Not, Cooler Temps Invade Eastern U.S.

Mid-July is typically when places from Colorado to Minnesota to New Jersey see their warmest temperatures of the year, but thanks to an incursion of cold polar air, parts of the eastern U.S. will see the mercury dip 5 to 25°F below normal this week. But as far as the National Weather Service is concerned, don’t call it a Polar Vortex. The event… Read More

Another Quiet Season As Tornado Peak Passes

Another Quiet Season As Tornado Peak Passes

June is likely to go into the books as the busiest month for tornadoes in what has been an overall quiet year. Tornado activity, which was initially on a record-low pace through late April, picked up most significantly last month, and now the odds of a tornado happening anywhere in the U.S. on a given day are on the decline. “We’ve just passed the… Read More

Long Wait Continues as El Niño Lagging

Long Wait Continues as El Niño Lagging

The months-long wait for El Niño continues: The latest update from the Climate Prediction Center, issued Thursday, finds that conditions still aren’t quite in place to declare a full-blown El Niño, though forecasters still expect one to emerge by the fall. If and when it does, it is expected to impact weather and climate across the world and could… Read More

Picture This: Gnarly Neoguri, Double Rainbows, No LeBron

Picture This: Gnarly Neoguri, Double Rainbows, No LeBron

From Japan to Brazil to a place truly out of this world, stormy weather grabbed the headlines this week — and made for some stunning photos. Scroll down for our choices for some of the most amazing weather shots from the week, including grandeur of Typhoon Neoguri, the beautiful calm after the storm in the U.S. capital, and a storm with a really… Read More

Super Typhoon Neoguri: 5 Stormy Facts

Super Typhoon Neoguri: 5 Stormy Facts

Super Typhoon Neoguri is bearing down on Japan’s Ryuku Islands, a string of more than 100 islands that make up the southernmost part of the Japanese archipelago. The storm’s path could take it will very close to the biggest of the islands, Okinawa, where the largest U.S. military installation in the Asia-Pacific region is located. Neoguri was about… Read More

Picture This: Hurricane Arthur & NYC Lightning

Picture This: Hurricane Arthur & NYC Lightning

There was definitely some pretty spectacular weather around the country this week, including a derecho, lots of lightning striking skyscrapers, and the first hurricane of the 2014 Atlantic season. In case you missed any of these events and the stunning photos they produced, we’ve got you covered: Here are our picks for some of the best weather… Read More

Arthur Becomes 1st Hurricane of 2014, Threatens N.C.

Arthur Becomes 1st Hurricane of 2014, Threatens N.C.

Arthur could swamp North Carolina’s coastline with several feet of storm surge, prompting evacuations in the Outer Banks. It has also forced the rescheduling of Fourth of July celebrations along the East Coast ahead of its expected trek northward.… Read More

New Storm Surge Maps Debut With TS Arthur

New Storm Surge Maps Debut With TS Arthur

Tropical Storm Arthur, the first named storm of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season, is slowly churning its way up the East Coast. Expected to become a hurricane before Thursday, Arthur could make landfall in North Carolina, bringing with it a surge of seawater. The threat has prompted the National Hurricane Center (NHC) to roll out for the first… Read More

90-Degree Days Late Arriving for Boston, NYC

90-Degree Days Late Arriving for Boston, NYC

Boston and New York City could see their first 90°F day of the summer Tuesday or Wednesday — unusually, if not unprecedentedly, late into the season. Not that we’re complaining. “It’s not every year that you see us get this late” in the summer without hitting 90°F, said Joey Picca, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service office in Upton… Read More

Launch Nears for NASA’s New CO2-Measuring Satellite

Launch Nears for NASA’s New CO2-Measuring Satellite

Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution to the end of the 20th century, humans put some 300 to 600 billion tons of carbon into the Earth’s atmosphere from the emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. Only about 200 billion tons of carbon has stayed in the atmosphere, warming it up by trapping heat — the rest has been taken up… Read More

New CO2 Milestone: 3 Months Above 400 PPM

New CO2 Milestone: 3 Months Above 400 PPM

April fell first. It lasted through May. Now June will be the third month in a row with average carbon dioxide levels above 400 parts per million. Atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gas, which helps drive global warming, haven’t been this high in somewhere between 800,000 and 15 million years. And while the 400 ppm mark is somewhat… Read More

Picture This: World Cup Flooding & Spectacular Lightning

Picture This: World Cup Flooding & Spectacular Lightning

Think you might have missed an awesome weather shot while you were busy watching the World Cup? Fear not, Climate Central has you covered. We’re rounding up the best weather and climate images from the week and giving you the story behind them. From Mother Nature’s best attempts to keep Cup fans from a match to a chart that illustrates just how bad… Read More

2014: A Weird Weather Year in Alaska So Far

2014: A Weird Weather Year in Alaska So Far

With the arrival of summer, the year is nearly halfway through, and it has been a warm and somewhat weird one weather-wise for Alaska. While the eastern half of the U.S. shivered through winter, Alaska saw unseasonable warmth, which melted snows early in some areas and brought rains instead of snows. Snow and rain failed to fall in other places and… Read More

New Report Puts Price Tag on Climate Change in U.S.

New Report Puts Price Tag on Climate Change in U.S.

NEW YORK — Climate change poses “multiple and significant risks” to the U.S. economy, particularly along coastlines and to the energy and agriculture sectors, a new report released Tuesday concludes. The report, the first to quantify the damage the American economy could sustain from unabated climate change, was compiled by the non-partisan Risky… Read More

Could 2014 Become the Warmest Year on Record?

Could 2014 Become the Warmest Year on Record?

For 351 months in a row, or more than 29 years, global temperatures have been warmer than average. May 2014, the 351st month in the uninterrupted series, was the warmest May on record, coming in with an average temperature 1.33°F above the 20th century average for the month (58.6°F), according to figures released Monday by the National Oceanic and… Read More

Atmosphere May Be Getting in Gear for El Niño

Atmosphere May Be Getting in Gear for El Niño

The atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean may be getting its act together and finally cooperating with shifting ocean waters to signal that an El Niño has arrived, climate scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported in their latest outlook on Thursday. El Niño watchers have been waiting for the climate phenomenon to… Read More

California’s Drought Just Got a Little Worse

California’s Drought Just Got a Little Worse

Just when it seemed like California’s drought couldn’t get any worse, it did: A staggering one third of the state is now in the worst level of drought. The latest update from the U.S. Drought Monitor, released Thursday, showed the amount of the state in “Exceptional Drought” — the highest category — expanding to about 33 percent from 25 percent.… Read More

Refreezing Water Causes Weird Warps in Greenland’s Ice

Refreezing Water Causes Weird Warps in Greenland’s Ice

The flat, glistening, white expanse of the Greenland Ice Sheet, stretching out across hundreds of thousands of square miles, appears placid, unchanging … boring even. But this tranquil surface belies the turmoil taking place below, at the base of the ice sheet. There, scientists have discovered sections of ice up to a kilometer thick and tens of ki… Read More

Climate Impact on Vermont May Have Benefits

Climate Impact on Vermont May Have Benefits

Vermont is getting warmer and wetter, according to the first state-level climate assessment in the nation.… Read More

A New Spin on Mapping U.S. Tornado Touchdowns

A New Spin on Mapping U.S. Tornado Touchdowns

Tornadoes and Waffle House, the venerable greasy spoon breakfast establishment that is a staple of Southeast highway stops, may not seem to have much to do with one another (except for their occurrence in the Southeast). But a map showing the highest concentrations of the restaurant by latitude, which has been making the rounds on Twitter, inspired… Read More

NASA Satellite Spies Atmospheric Double Whammy

NASA Satellite Spies Atmospheric Double Whammy

NASA’s eyes in the sky are important parts of weather-monitoring efforts, with satellites tracking hurricanes as they barrel across the ocean and storm systems as they sweep across the country. But sometimes they just find really cool stuff in the atmosphere. Such is the case with an image taken by the MODIS instrument aboard the Aqua satellite… Read More