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Andrea Thompson

Andrea Thompson

Editorial

Andrea Thompson is a Senior Science Writer at Climate Central, focusing on extreme weather and climate change. Previously, Andrea was a writer and reporter for Live Science and Space.com, reporting on climate change, weather and other science-related topics. She graduated from Georgia Tech with a B.S. in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences in 2004 and a Master's in the same subject in 2006. She attended the Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program at New York University and graduated with a Master of Arts in 2006.

Most Recent News Entries:

Picture This: Awesome Auroras and Triple Rainbows

Picture This: Awesome Auroras and Triple Rainbows

The skies were awash in color this week, it seems, with auroras dancing across the night skies in the north, a bright triple rainbow appearing in Alaska and the sunset-hued glow of rain over one of the nation's natural jewels, Yosemite National Park. We've rounded up these riotous displays here, along with a few more of our favorite weather and… Read More

What Global Warming Might Mean for Extreme Snowfalls

What Global Warming Might Mean for Extreme Snowfalls

So if the world is warming, that means winters should be less snowy, right? Well, it’s a bit more complicated than that. OK, it’s a lot more complicated. While the average annual snowfall in most parts of the world is indeed expected to decline, the extreme snowfalls — those that hit a place once every 10 or 20 years and can cause major headaches… Read More

Picture This: Pileus Cloud and Lots and Lots of Rain

Picture This: Pileus Cloud and Lots and Lots of Rain

Boy, did it rain a lot this week. Torrential rains fell from Seattle to Long Island, flooding not only highways, houses and parking lots, but also Twitter with images of cars covered nearly up to their roofs and stranded drivers. But there were plenty of other memorable weather pictures this week, and we’ve got some of the best for you here… Read More

Humans to Blame for Much of Recent Glacier Melt

Humans to Blame for Much of Recent Glacier Melt

From Alaska to the Alps, photos of today’s diminished glaciers contrasted with grainy black-and-white images of their former, more massive states are some of the most widely used examples of the impact of human-caused climate change, with their melt threatening water supplies, enhancing sea level rise, and posing threats like floods from bursting… Read More

How Did the Brooklyn Dust Devil Form?

How Did the Brooklyn Dust Devil Form?

Some denizens of Brooklyn who were out enjoying a warm, sunny summer day in a park in the Williamsburg neighborhood on Sunday got quite a surprise when a dust devil spun across a baseball diamond as park goers lounged on beach towels nearby. Dust devils — small, rotating columns of air that we can see because of the dust and debris they pick up… Read More

Picture This: Fire Clouds & A Slew of Pacific Storms

Picture This: Fire Clouds & A Slew of Pacific Storms

The weather has provided extreme bookends to the week, with a 1-in-500 year rainfall event washing out Mt. Baldy, Calif., in the middle of what is supposed to be the dry season, while a hurricane bore down on Hawaii for the first time in 22 years. The thunderstorms that unleashed the rains on California also produced lots of lightning that sparked… Read More

Why Hurricanes Are So Rare in Hawaii

Why Hurricanes Are So Rare in Hawaii

The last time a hurricane was bearing down on the Hawaiian Islands, Steven Spielberg was on Kauaʻi finishing filming of the now iconic movie “Jurassic Park” when Hurricane Iniki hit the island as a Category 4 storm. Now — 22 years later — not one, but an unprecedented two hurricanes are making a beeline for the island chain and residents are… Read More

Forecasters Lower Hurricane Season Expectations

Forecasters Lower Hurricane Season Expectations

Hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean basin is likely to be even more lackluster for the remainder of the season than forecasters originally thought when it began on June 1. Forces like cool ocean waters and a stable atmospheric environment are keeping storms from forming and growing, and the El Nino that is faltering but still expected to… Read More

Odds of El Niño Drop; Still Expected to Form

Odds of El Niño Drop; Still Expected to Form

The El Niño that seems to be trying to form in the tropical Pacific Ocean is looking a little less likely now, though the chances of it developing are still double the normal odds, forecasters said in the latest monthly update on the cyclical climate phenomenon, released Thursday. That update lowered the odds of an El Niño occurring in fall and… Read More

Putting a Climate Context on SoCal’s Flash Floods

Putting a Climate Context on SoCal’s Flash Floods

A confluence of extreme atmospheric conditions over Southern California, possibly with an assist from the intense drought in the state, set the stage for the torrential rains and flash flooding that washed away cars and homes in some areas like Mt. Baldy on Sunday. And while the U.S. Southwest is expected to increasingly dry out in a warming… Read More

Picture This: Eerie Wildfire, Stirring Rainbow & Sharknado!

Picture This: Eerie Wildfire, Stirring Rainbow & Sharknado!

The weather news of the week was certainly the blast of cool air that once again set temperatures at comfortable levels across the eastern half of the U.S. That same air mass sent a storm system through the Northeast, spawning a rare Boston-area tornado. It also corresponding with another ridge of hot air hanging out over the western half of the… Read More

Record-Setting Drought Intensifies in Parched California

Record-Setting Drought Intensifies in Parched California

The relentless heat that has plagued the western half of the country this summer has ratcheted up California’s terrible drought once again, bringing it to record levels. More than half of the state is in “exceptional” drought, the highest category recognized by the U.S. Drought Monitor, which released its latest update on Thursday. “The heat has… Read More

No Record, But Arctic Sea Ice Will be Among 10 Lowest

No Record, But Arctic Sea Ice Will be Among 10 Lowest

The extent of sea ice covering the Arctic Ocean at the end of the summer season likely won’t surpass the record low of 2012, but 2014 will still likely rank as one of the lowest minimum extents (or areas) in the record books. That’s according to Julienne Stroeve, a scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo. “It’s likely… Read More

Late July Chill Helps Set Record Lows Across the East

Late July Chill Helps Set Record Lows Across the East

Folks across the eastern U.S. could be forgiven for thinking they’d pulled a Rip van Winkle and woken up in October on Wednesday morning. Temperatures dipped down overnight into the 60s, 50s and even 40s, setting record lows left and right. The chill in the air comes courtesy of yet another bout of cool Canadian air that dipped down over the area… Read More

Tornado Hits Near Boston As Cold Air Invades U.S. Again

Tornado Hits Near Boston As Cold Air Invades U.S. Again

A tornado touches down north of Boston as another blast of colder-than-normal air invades the eastern U.S.… Read More

Picture This: Lucky Lightning Photo & Crazy Bug Swarm

Picture This: Lucky Lightning Photo & Crazy Bug Swarm

When weather strikes, it can lead to some amazing and unexpected photos, like the shot of lightning on flier caught from her plane window. It can also set up the conditions for some stunning scenic shots, as storms in Glacier National Park showed earlier this week. And then, sometimes what looks like weather on radar screen isn't actually weather… Read More

This Would be the Ultimate ‘Sunburn’ for Your Summer

This Would be the Ultimate ‘Sunburn’ for Your Summer

As you head into another summer weekend and your thoughts turn toward beach trips and barbecues, we thought we’d share with you a little light (no pun intended) reading about our ultimate power source, the sun, and the chance it could unleash a huge storm that could cause major damage to systems that modern life depends on. We’ll start with a… Read More

Why Do We Care So Much About El Niño?

Why Do We Care So Much About El Niño?

Every month since March, when the first El Niño Watch was issued, forecasters, government officials around the world, and yes, even those in the media, have been watching with bated breath to see whether various climate agencies would officially pronounce the arrival of that infamous climate phenomenon. So far, no clear-cut El Niño has been… Read More

Picture This: Twin Waterspouts and Amazing Aurora

Picture This: Twin Waterspouts and Amazing Aurora

The big weather story this week was of course the unseasonably cool air that washed over much of the eastern half of the U.S. this week (whether or not it was related to the polar vortex). But cold air is kind of hard to photograph, so we’ve rounded up some other stunning shots taken of various weather phenomena this week. Enjoy! The other big… Read More

What’s Behind Super Typhoon’s Rapid Intensification?

What’s Behind Super Typhoon’s Rapid Intensification?

Typhoon Rammasun first tore across the Philippines earlier this week, dumping up to 13 inches of rain in some spots and causing the deaths of at least 40 people. It then emerged over the South China Sea and underwent a rapid re-intensification that boosted it to Super Typhoon status before it hit China’s Hainan Island, becoming the most intense… Read More

Six Months In and Sizzling California Sets Record

Six Months In and Sizzling California Sets Record

The record exemplifies a temperature pattern that has held across the country for much of the year, with above-average temperatures in the West and below average in the East. The pattern has kept monthly average temperatures for the entire U.S. -- as well as the average temperature for the year-to-date -- in the middle of the pack record-wise, but … Read More

Polar Vortex or Not, Cooler Temps Invade Eastern U.S.

Polar Vortex or Not, Cooler Temps Invade Eastern U.S.

Mid-July is typically when places from Colorado to Minnesota to New Jersey see their warmest temperatures of the year, but thanks to an incursion of cold polar air, parts of the eastern U.S. will see the mercury dip 5 to 25°F below normal this week. But as far as the National Weather Service is concerned, don’t call it a Polar Vortex. The event… Read More

Another Quiet Season As Tornado Peak Passes

Another Quiet Season As Tornado Peak Passes

June is likely to go into the books as the busiest month for tornadoes in what has been an overall quiet year. Tornado activity, which was initially on a record-low pace through late April, picked up most significantly last month, and now the odds of a tornado happening anywhere in the U.S. on a given day are on the decline. “We’ve just passed the… Read More

Long Wait Continues as El Niño Lagging

Long Wait Continues as El Niño Lagging

The months-long wait for El Niño continues: The latest update from the Climate Prediction Center, issued Thursday, finds that conditions still aren’t quite in place to declare a full-blown El Niño, though forecasters still expect one to emerge by the fall. If and when it does, it is expected to impact weather and climate across the world and could… Read More

Picture This: Gnarly Neoguri, Double Rainbows, No LeBron

Picture This: Gnarly Neoguri, Double Rainbows, No LeBron

From Japan to Brazil to a place truly out of this world, stormy weather grabbed the headlines this week — and made for some stunning photos. Scroll down for our choices for some of the most amazing weather shots from the week, including grandeur of Typhoon Neoguri, the beautiful calm after the storm in the U.S. capital, and a storm with a really… Read More