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Andrea Thompson

Andrea Thompson

Editorial

Andrea Thompson is a Senior Science Writer at Climate Central, focusing on extreme weather and climate change. Previously, Andrea was a writer and reporter for Live Science and Space.com, reporting on climate change, weather and other science-related topics. She graduated from Georgia Tech with a B.S. in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences in 2004 and a Master's in the same subject in 2006. She attended the Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program at New York University and graduated with a Master of Arts in 2006.

Most Recent News Entries:

After Much Ado, El Niño Officially Declared

After Much Ado, El Niño Officially Declared

Just when everyone had pretty much written it off, the El Niño event that has been nearly a year in the offing finally emerged in February and could last through the spring and summer, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Thursday. This isn’t the blockbuster El Niño many anticipated when the first hints of an impending… Read More

Arctic Sea Ice Is Getting Thinner, Faster

Arctic Sea Ice Is Getting Thinner, Faster

While the steady disappearance of sea ice in the Arctic has been one of the hallmark effects of global warming, research shows it is not only covering less of the planet, but it’s also getting significantly thinner. That makes it more susceptible to melting, potentially altering local ecosystems, shipping routes and ocean and atmospheric patterns.… Read More

A February First: CO2 Levels Pass 400 PPM Milestone

A February First: CO2 Levels Pass 400 PPM Milestone

With only one day left in the month, it’s basically official: February’s average carbon dioxide level will be above 400 parts per million, a marker of how much of the greenhouse gas is accumulating in the atmosphere thanks to human emissions. Last year, the monthly average didn’t go above the 400 ppm mark until April, which was the first month in… Read More

For the West, A Winter That Has Felt More Like Spring

For the West, A Winter That Has Felt More Like Spring

From San Diego to Seattle, February has looked — and felt — a lot more like April. Flowers that normally wouldn’t start to bud until well into spring have already started to blossom and grow. Residents have been walking around in t-shirts and shorts, a rarity even for Southern California winters. “Winter has seemed to have completely forgotten… Read More

2015 Picks Up Where 2014 Record Heat Left Off

2015 Picks Up Where 2014 Record Heat Left Off

The warmth that led 2014 to become the hottest year on record has continued into 2015, with this January ranking as the second hottest January on record globally, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Thursday. “I think it is safe to say that the warmth so far in 2015 really is a continuation of the warmth in 2014,” NOAA… Read More

Sea Ice Still Declining, Despite Antarctica’s Gains

Sea Ice Still Declining, Despite Antarctica’s Gains

When Antarctica grabbed headlines last year because of record-high sea ice levels circling the southernmost continent, it created confusion. Its increase was so at odds with the trend of dwindling sea ice, particularly in the Arctic, that it prompted those skeptical of the science of climate change to suggest it meant ocean ice is not disappearing.… Read More

Cold Air Invasion Coming: What’s the Role of Warming?

Cold Air Invasion Coming: What’s the Role of Warming?

Get ready for the invasion — of cold air. Temperatures are set to drop to levels that are low even for the middle of winter across the eastern U.S. starting Thursday and again over the weekend as Arctic air makes repeated surges southward. Temperatures Sunday morning could be below freezing as far south as Florida. This pattern may sound familiar t… Read More

How Warming May Alter Critical ‘Atmospheric Rivers’

How Warming May Alter Critical ‘Atmospheric Rivers’

The hose has been turned back on full-force over Northern California: A stream of moisture is flowing over the drought-riddled state and dropping copious rains just days after the close of one of the driest Januarys on record. The influx of much-needed rain comes courtesy of a feature called an atmospheric river that is a key source of much of the… Read More

What If Sandy’s Surge Swamped Washington, D.C.?

What If Sandy’s Surge Swamped Washington, D.C.?

New Yorkers weren’t the only ones shocked and alarmed as Hurricane Sandy pushed a wall of water into the city, funneling the harbor into streets and sending torrents cascading into subways. More than 200 miles to the south, officials in Washington, D.C., were watching and imagining their city in New York’s shoes. Officials with the Metro, jolted by… Read More

Here’s What the Inside of Greenland Looks Like, in 3D

Here’s What the Inside of Greenland Looks Like, in 3D

Want to know what the inside of an ice sheet looks like? A new 3D map and animation of the Greenland ice sheet lets researchers peer into the layers of ice laid down over millennia and see how they have been warped as they flow over time and are put under pressure as newer layers accumulate above. This will help them better understand how Greenland… Read More

One More Log on the Fire for 2014 As Hottest Year

One More Log on the Fire for 2014 As Hottest Year

If you need further confirmation that 2014 was the hottest year on record, the World Meteorological Organization has you covered. The United Nations agency announced Monday that they, like various national agencies and informed by those agencies’ data, have placed 2014 atop the temperature records. They had the year coming in at 1.03°F above the… Read More

Accelerated Ice Melt Causing Iceland to Rise

Accelerated Ice Melt Causing Iceland to Rise

Parts of Iceland are rising, and the culprit may be climate change. GPS measurements show that land in the central and southern parts of Iceland have been rising at a faster pace every year, beginning at about the same time as the onset of the ever-increasing melt of the island’s eponymous ice due to rising temperatures, a new study finds. “There… Read More

Picture This: So Much Snow

Picture This: So Much Snow

Snow, snow and more snow seems to be the story for the Northeast right now. After a major nor’easter dumped up to 2-3 feet of snow on parts of eastern Long Island and Massachusetts early in the week, another system came through on Friday to provide a fresh coating of white, while yet another storm is expected early next week… Read More

What Can We Learn from the NYC Forecast ‘Bust’?

What Can We Learn from the NYC Forecast ‘Bust’?

New Yorkers went to sleep last night expecting to wake up to their city buried in snow. Instead, they woke up with just a few inches. As has become standard practice, social media lit up with annoyed and outraged cries accusing meteorologists and the media of overhyping the storm — a common refrain when a forecast doesn’t pan out. Of course, the… Read More

What A Warming World Means for Major Snowstorms

What A Warming World Means for Major Snowstorms

The first flakes have already begun falling from New Jersey up through Boston. Flights in the Northeast are being cancelled left and right. Store shelves have been cleared of bread and milk. The blizzard is coming. An intense nor’easter is slated to drop snowfalls ranging from a few inches to around 3 feet in the worst-hit spots from Monday through… Read More

Picture This: Illuminating Lightning & Rare Texas Snow

Picture This: Illuminating Lightning & Rare Texas Snow

This workweek was a short one for those of us in the U.S., but it was still packed with plenty of amazing weather photos. As usual, some of the most stunning came from the vantage point of space, which offered a new perspective on lightning. Winter also continues to leave its mark, but in sometimes surprising places. European Space Agency astronaut… Read More

Surprise Lake Sheds Light on Underbelly of Greenland Ice

Surprise Lake Sheds Light on Underbelly of Greenland Ice

On a clear day, anyone flying over Greenland on the route between North America and Europe can look down and see the bright blue patches of melted water atop the flat, blindingly white expanse of the ice sheet that covers the island, the second largest chunk of ice on Earth. Scientists have long known this meltwater flows in streams along the ice… Read More

After December Rains, California Comes Up Dry

After December Rains, California Comes Up Dry

Two steps forward, one-and-a-half steps back: That’s been the story of the tenacious California drought lately. After a torrent of rains in December made a small dent in the deep, statewide drought, the faucet has turned off, and some areas have relapsed back into ‘exceptional’ drought, the worst drought category recognized by the U.S Drought … Read More

Picture This: Stunning Halos and Freaky Frost

Picture This: Stunning Halos and Freaky Frost

While most of the weather we experience comes in the sunny or rainy, cold or warm standard varities, the Earth's atmosphere is capable of producing some strange, stunning phenomena if you pay enough attention. We've got a few of those gems this week, along with some beautiful views that remind you just how lovely our home planet can be. It’s only… Read More

A Broken Record: 2014 Hottest Year

A Broken Record: 2014 Hottest Year

The final numbers are in: 2014 is officially the hottest year on record in the past 135 years, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced Friday. The record does not come as a surprise as it’s another marker of the sustained accumulation of heat in the atmosphere thanks to the unabated emissions of greenhouses… Read More

Sea Level Rise Accelerating Faster Than Thought

Sea Level Rise Accelerating Faster Than Thought

The acceleration of the rate of sea level rise over the last couple decades is even higher than scientists had thought, according to a new study that uses a novel method to estimate global sea level rise. The reason? The rate of rise across the 20th century has actually been overestimated — by as much as 30 percent — meaning there’s been a bigger… Read More

2015 Begins With CO2 Above 400 PPM Mark

2015 Begins With CO2 Above 400 PPM Mark

The new year has only just begun, but we’ve already recorded our first days with average carbon dioxide levels above 400 parts per million, potentially leading to many months in a row above this threshold, experts say. The Scripps Institution of Oceanography records of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels show that Jan. 1 was the first day of the… Read More

Picture This: So Cold It Snowed in Florida

Picture This: So Cold It Snowed in Florida

So. It got pretty cold this week. How cold? It snowed in Florida. But snow wasn’t the only sign of winter, as temperatures and wind chills plummeted across much of the country as Arctic air surged southward, leading to some stunning maps, teeth-chattering sights and some serious bundling up. But that cold was offset by some record warm temperature… Read More

Clock Is Ticking on Elusive El Niño Event

Clock Is Ticking on Elusive El Niño Event

Time is running out, El Niño. If the climate phenomenon that forecasters have been watching for the better part of a year — and that can alter weather patterns around the globe — doesn’t get going soon, then it probably won’t happen. And with the latest forecast update released Thursday, the odds El Niño will get its act together in time are if… Read More

EPA Chief: Weather, Climate Scientists’ Work Is ‘Essential’

EPA Chief: Weather, Climate Scientists’ Work Is ‘Essential’

As the sun slowly crept above the desert horizon Wednesday morning, the unmistakable Boston accent of EPA administrator Gina McCarthy jolted to life a room of scientists gathered here for the annual meeting of the American Meteorological Society. “Are you awake?” she asked, prompting a round a laughter that set the tone for her spirited talk and… Read More