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Andrea Thompson

Andrea Thompson

Editorial

Andrea Thompson is a Senior Science Writer at Climate Central, focusing on extreme weather and climate change. Previously, Andrea was a writer and reporter for Live Science and Space.com, reporting on climate change, weather and other science-related topics. She graduated from Georgia Tech with a B.S. in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences in 2004 and a Master's in the same subject in 2006. She attended the Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program at New York University and graduated with a Master of Arts in 2006.

Most Recent News Entries:

Picture This: Wavy Clouds & A Gnarly Nor’easter

Picture This: Wavy Clouds & A Gnarly Nor’easter

Well the nor'easter that lashed the Northeast this week is finally over, though it made for some pretty awesome satellite images. And it wasn't the only weather or sky event that made for pretty pictures. A partial solar eclipse, some rare clouds and even last weekend's Hurricane Gonzalo also yielded some images that will make you "oooh" and "aaah.… Read More

What Will Winter Hold for Drought-Plagued California?

What Will Winter Hold for Drought-Plagued California?

California really needs this winter to be a wet one. The state is now at the beginning of the fourth year of one if its worst droughts on record. The drought has been fueled by a spate of disappointing winter rainy seasons that have left meager snowpacks and diminished reservoir levels, combined with record-warm temperatures that have driven… Read More

Hot News: 2014 On Track to Become Warmest Year

Hot News: 2014 On Track to Become Warmest Year

The "odds are good" that 2014 will be the warmest year in the books, fueled by record ocean warmth.… Read More

Picture This: Seasonal Rainbows & A Monster Hurricane

Picture This: Seasonal Rainbows & A Monster Hurricane

The big news in weather this week was the sudden surge of storm activity in the Atlantic Ocean (not to mention a fairly rare tropical storm heading Hawaii’s way). The star of the cyclone show has been Hurricane Gonzalo, the first Category 4 hurricane in the Atlantic basin since 2011. But there was of course weather news outside of the tropics, from… Read More

Tornado Days Decreasing, but Number Per Day Rising

Tornado Days Decreasing, but Number Per Day Rising

Over the past couple of decades, tornado season has seen a lot more variation than it used to. Not only have some of the earliest and latest starts to the tornado season been recorded since the mid-1990s, but tornadoes are seeming to cluster together so that there are fewer days with tornadoes, but more tornadoes on the days that do have them, a … Read More

Winter Unlikely to See Repeat of Frigid Polar Vortex

Winter Unlikely to See Repeat of Frigid Polar Vortex

Those who shivered through the recent frigid and long-lasting winter can perhaps look forward to a reprieve from the onslaught of the Polar Vortex, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday in it’s newly released winter climate outlook. “At this point there’s nothing that indicates we’ll see a repeat of that,” said Mike… Read More

What’s Behind Recent Flurry of Hurricane Activity?

What’s Behind Recent Flurry of Hurricane Activity?

The Atlantic hurricane season usually hits its peak of stormy activity in early September, with more storms typically spinning up in that month than any other month of the six-month hurricane season. But after a couple storms early in the month, the basin went quiet for the rest of this September, even though that is the time when oceans reach th… Read More

September Was Warmest on Record, NASA Data Shows

September Was Warmest on Record, NASA Data Shows

September 2014 was the warmest September since 1880, updated NASA data shows.… Read More

Picture This: Monster Typhoon and Miami’s King Tides

Picture This: Monster Typhoon and Miami’s King Tides

With October comes Halloween, and this week was certainly full of some scary weather. Typhoon Vongfong spun up to monster size and strength in the Pacific, while strong winds knocked down trees in Massachusetts. Perhaps even more fitting to the upcoming holiday was this week’s blood-red full moon. Read on to find out what caused it and see amazing… Read More

Where Is El Nino? And Why Do We Care?

Where Is El Nino? And Why Do We Care?

But the reason we still care so much about it, following all of its tiny fluctuations toward becoming a full-blown El Niño, is that it can have important effects on the world’s weather, including in the U.S. It can even boost global temperatures, helping set the planet on the course to be the warmest year on record.… Read More

Antarctic Sea Ice Officially Hits New Record Maximum

Antarctic Sea Ice Officially Hits New Record Maximum

It’s official: Antarctic sea ice hit its annual winter maximum on Sept. 22, reaching a record area of 20.11 million square kilometers (7.76 million square miles), the National Snow and Ice Data Center announced Tuesday. That maximum extent was 1.54 million square kilometers (595,000 square miles) above the 1981 to 2010 average extent, the NSIDC… Read More

Picture This: Fall Snow and Bizarre Clouds Over NYC

Picture This: Fall Snow and Bizarre Clouds Over NYC

The signs of fall continue to flourish, but the weather isn't all clear skies. Some intimidating clouds rolled over New York City early in the week, just as the first snows of the season fell on some of Colorado's peaks. Across the pond, torrential rains flooded a city in southern France, while in the Pacific, yet another typhoon took aim at Japan.… Read More

Drought Drains Already Diminished Aral Sea

Drought Drains Already Diminished Aral Sea

The Aral Sea has been dying a long, slow death. This summer, another nail was driven into its coffin. Starting in the 1950s, when Soviet authorities began programs that diverted water from its tributaries, the inland lake in Central Asia — once the fourth largest in the world, bigger than Lake Huron — has been shrinking. This summer, the eastern l… Read More

Antarctic Sea Ice Hits New Max; Continent Still Warming

Antarctic Sea Ice Hits New Max; Continent Still Warming

The donut of sea ice encircling Antarctica is hovering around its yearly winter maximum area, and there’s little question that it’s going to set a record high this year. “Antarctic sea ice in 2014 is going to set a record for sure,” said Ted Scambos, a senior scientist with the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo. This end-of-sea… Read More

Climate Fueled Some of 2013’s Most Extreme Events

Climate Fueled Some of 2013’s Most Extreme Events

Heat waves can clearly be linked to climate change, a new report finds, while rain events are murkier.… Read More

Picture This: Fogbows and Fall Begins

Picture This: Fogbows and Fall Begins

This week, the sun set on summer and rose on the vivid colors of fall, slowly spreading across the northern parts of the country. Pictures of the scarlet and amber leaves at national parks and wildlife areas were among the stunning shots from the past week. A sunrise seen from a perch in space and a strange-looking phenomenon called a fogbow also… Read More

Peak of Tornado Season Shifting Earlier in Tornado Alley

Peak of Tornado Season Shifting Earlier in Tornado Alley

Living in Missouri as a kid, John Long grew up with tornadoes. He went through the same tornado drills that all school children from tornado-prone parts of the country know well: Filing into school hallways and crouching against walls with a textbook or hands covering the head. Tornadoes were a part of life. But growing up, Long said, he and… Read More

Picture This: Hurricanes and Wildfires from Space

Picture This: Hurricanes and Wildfires from Space

Winds and fire wrought havoc this week as wildfires exploded in Northern California and Hurricane Odile became the most powerful storm to strike Baja California. The devastation of both events was caught in poignant and impactful photos. But other images captured more peaceful tableaus, including the beauty of landscapes erupting in a riot of… Read More

2014 on Track to be Hottest Year on Record

2014 on Track to be Hottest Year on Record

Just days after NASA data showed that August 2014 was the warmest August on record, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed the ranking and raised the ante: There’s a good chance 2014 could become the warmest year on record. “If we continue a consistent departure from average for the rest of 2014, we will edge out 2010 as… Read More

Arctic Sea Ice to Reach Sixth Lowest Extent on Record

Arctic Sea Ice to Reach Sixth Lowest Extent on Record

As summer draws to a close, the Arctic sea ice melt season is coming to an end. And while the season didn’t top 2012’s astounding record melt, it has still resulted in what will likely be the sixth lowest September minimum ice extent on record. The extent of the ice on Sept. 15 was 1.96 million square miles, according to the National Snow and Ice D… Read More

NASA Ranks This August as Warmest on Record

NASA Ranks This August as Warmest on Record

While this summer may have felt like fall across much of the eastern half of the U.S., worldwide the overall picture was a warm one. This August was the warmest August on record globally, according to newly released NASA temperature data, while the summer tied for the fourth warmest. Central Europe, northern Africa, parts of South America, and… Read More

Picture This: Summer Snow and Gnarly Lightning

Picture This: Summer Snow and Gnarly Lightning

It was a weird week for weather, that's for sure. Snows fell from Calgary to Rapid City -- in the middle of September. That's early even for Canada! Meanwhile monsoon rains, helped along my moisture from the remnants of tropical storms, soaked parts of the Southwest, not used to such deluges. We've got photos of those two events, as well as look ba… Read More

Warming Air Was Trigger for Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse

Warming Air Was Trigger for Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse

It was clear to anyone who went to Antarctica in the summer of 2001-02 that it was an unusually warm one — record-setting, in fact — and just one in a series of warm austral summers. In December 2001, geologic oceanographer Eugene Domack, now at the University of South Florida, was part of an expedition sampling the Southern Ocean seafloor around… Read More

Struggling El Niño Still Shaping Hurricane Activity

Struggling El Niño Still Shaping Hurricane Activity

September 10 generally marks the peak of hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean basin, but this year there are no tropical cyclones to be seen. Currently, there are only two stormy areas that have only small chances of developing into tropical storms over the next few days. For that dearth of activity, you can thank El Niño, or at least the… Read More

Picture This: Rainbows, Rainbows & More Rainbows

Picture This: Rainbows, Rainbows & More Rainbows

We can’t seem to go a week without a storm producing one amazing photo of a rainbow or another, be they of the single, double or triple variety. This week was no exception, as you will see below, with three stunning shots. Of course, plenty of other weather phenomena produced wow-worthy pictures of their own. There’s always something amazing to see… Read More