Videos Section

What is Nuclear Waste and What Do We Do With It? Watch Video

What is Nuclear Waste and What Do We Do With It?

Radioactive waste is an unavoidable by-product of nuclear power that requires safe storage.

How Are Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons Related? Watch Video

How Are Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons Related?

A facility processing uranium ore into nuclear power plant fuel can process the ore into fuel for a nuclear weapon instead.

How Was Nuclear Energy Discovered? Watch Video

How Was Nuclear Energy Discovered?

Nuclear power results from radiation, which was discovered around 1900. It took several decades after that for scientists to understand how to harness its energy – for power and for weapons.

Where in the World Is Nuclear Power? Watch Video

Where in the World Is Nuclear Power?

Over 400 nuclear reactors are operating today in the world in 30 different countries.

What Are the Benefits and Risks of Nuclear Power? Watch Video

What Are the Benefits and Risks of Nuclear Power?

Nuclear power emits much lower greenhouse gas emissions than electricity from coal but there is risk of a reactor accident, unresolved issues with radioactive waste disposal, and weapons.

How Do We Get Electricity from Nuclear Energy? Watch Video

How Do We Get Electricity from Nuclear Energy?

The energy released from the nucleus of an atom – nuclear energy – is harnessed today by heating water to make steam. The steam turns a turbine that drives a generator to make electricity.

Taking the Carbon Out of Coal Watch Video Science Behind the Story

Taking the Carbon Out of Coal

Carbon capture and sequestration or CCS is a technology that can remove carbon dioxide emitted by a power plant and store it underground. Climate Central visits the site of a proposed coal plant in Linden, NJ to find out how it is done.

What We Know For Sure Watch Video Science Behind the Story

What We Know For Sure

No scientist disputes that carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas and that it is increasing in the atmosphere. And careful detective work shows that the increase has chemical fingerprints — from us.