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What Are the Benefits and Risks of Nuclear Power? Watch Video

Videos - Feature Stories

What Are the Benefits and Risks of Nuclear Power?

Nuclear power emits much lower greenhouse gas emissions than electricity from coal but there is risk of a reactor accident, unresolved issues with radioactive waste disposal, and weapons.

What We Know For Sure Watch Video Science Behind the Story

Videos - Feature Stories

What We Know For Sure

No scientist disputes that carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas and that it is increasing in the atmosphere. And careful detective work shows that the increase has chemical fingerprints — from us.

Georgia: Coal and Carbon Watch Video Science Behind the Story

Videos - Feature Stories

Georgia: Coal and Carbon

Coal generates carbon dioxide when combusted, which is causing the world to warm. In Georgia, a state that gets over 60 percent of its electricity from coal, some coastal residents are connecting the dots between coal and changes in the local ecology and economy attributed to global warming. Recognizing the need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, engineers are exploring "clean coal" technology. What is this technology? Will it work?

Iowa: Corn and Climate Watch Video Science Behind the Story

Videos - Feature Stories

Iowa: Corn and Climate

Congress helped bolster the corn ethanol business in Iowa by mandating the Renewable Fuel Standard in 2005. But scientists are concerned about the unexpected consequences of putting more of Iowa's land into corn production — consequences that may make corn ethanol a bigger source of climate-warming gases than regular gasoline.

Montana: Trout and Drought Watch Video Science Behind the Story

Videos - Feature Stories

Montana: Trout and Drought

The flow of water in Montana's rivers is lifeblood for its economy, both through tourism and agriculture. Montana's recreational fishing and agricultural industries depend on cool waters flowing from melting snow high in the mountains throughout the summer. But across Montana, rising temperatures are causing a series of changes.