Videos Section
Telling the story with moving pictures

Extreme Weather More Frequent with Global Warming Watch Video

Videos - On the Media

Extreme Weather More Frequent with Global Warming

Climate Central Chief Climatologist Dr. Heidi Cullen explains in a panel discussion on ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos how climate change increases the risks of extreme weather events like heat waves, droughts, and monster storms.

Extreme Weather 101: Drought & Our Changing Climate Watch Video

Videos - Extreme Weather

Extreme Weather 101: Drought & Our Changing Climate

Scientist Mike Brewer and meteorologist Dan Satterfield explain the connection between drought and a changing climate.

Catastrophic Drought a Possible Snapshot of Future Watch Video

Videos - On the Media

Catastrophic Drought a Possible Snapshot of Future

MSNBC’s Tamron Hall interviews Climate Central Chief Climatologist Dr. Heidi Cullen about the role climate change plays in the dry and deadly weather.

Wildfires Out West Watch Video

Videos - Extreme Weather

Wildfires Out West

In different parts of the American West, climate influences wildfires in unexpected ways.

How Do We Know: Groundwater Watch Video

Videos - Climate in Context

How Do We Know: Groundwater

NASA scientist Michael Watkins explains how satellites are used to monitor our changing global groundwater supplies.

How Do We Know: Drought Watch Video

Videos - Extreme Weather

How Do We Know: Drought

How do we know when a region may be experiencing an early drought? Dr. Heidi Cullen talks to NASA scientist Molly Brown, who relies on sophisticated satellites for the answer.

Washington: Warming and Wildfires Watch Video

Videos - States of Change

Washington: Warming and Wildfires

Wildfires are on the rise in the State of Washington, as they are in much of the American West and climate change looks at least partly responsible.

Montana: Trout and Drought Watch Video

Videos - States of Change

Montana: Trout and Drought

Montana's recreational fishing and agricultural industries depend on cool waters flowing from melting snow high in the mountains throughout the summer. But across Montana, rising temperatures are causing a series of changes.