Support Our Work

Publications

Peer-reviewed Research:

TV Weathercasters’ Views of Climate Change Appear to Be Rapidly Evolving
October 2017, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society  — More than 90% of weathercasters indicated that climate change is happening and approximately 80% indicated that human-caused climate change is happening in this survey update.
The Views of Weathercasters Are Rapidly Evolving
2017, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society  — Findings from the most recent surveys of TV weathercasters – which are methodologically superior to prior surveys in a number of important ways – suggest that weathercasters' views of climate change may be rapidly evolving.
Defining ecological drought for the 21st century
June 26, 2017, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society  — Droughts of the 21st century are characterized by hotter temperatures, longer duration and greater spatial extent, and are increasingly exacerbated by human demands for water.
Most Americans Want to Learn More About Climate Change
June 2017, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society  — American Meteorological Society (AMS) members have long played leading roles in climate science research in the United States and internationally.
TV Weathercasters as Local Climate Educators
August 2016, Oxford  — Global climate change is influencing the weather in every region of the United States, often in harmful ways. Yet, like people in many countries, most Americans view climate change as a threat that is distant in space.
Global DEM Errors Underpredict Coastal Vulnerability to Sea Level Rise and Flooding
2016, Frontiers in Earth Science  — Elevation data based on NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) have been widely used to evaluate threats from global sea level rise, storm surge, and coastal floods.
Climate Matters: A Comprehensive Educational Resource Program for Broadcast Meteorologists
June 2016, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society  — Broadcast meteorologists are ideally positioned to educate Americans about the current and projected impacts of climate change in their community.
Carbon choices determine US cities committed to futures below sea level
2015, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  — Anthropogenic carbon emissions lock in long-term sea-level rise that greatly exceeds projections for this century, posing profound challenges for coastal development and cultural legacies.
Climate change education through TV weathercasts: Results of a field experiment
January 2014, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society  — The nation’s TV meteorologists and weathercasters the vast majority of whom work in local TV—are a potentially important source of informal science education about climate change for a wide cross section of the U.S. population.
Probabilistic 21st and 22nd century sea‐level projections at a global network of tide‐gauge sites
2014, Earth's Future  — Sea-level rise due to both climate change and non-climatic factors threatens coastal settlements, infrastructure, and ecosystems.
Tidally adjusted estimates of topographic vulnerability to sea level rise and flooding for the contiguous United States
2012, Environmental Research Letters  — Because sea level could rise 1 m or more during the next century, it is important to understand what land, communities and assets may be most at risk from increased flooding and eventual submersion.
Modeling sea level rise impacts on storm surges along U.S. coasts
2012, Environmental Research Letters  — Sound policies for protecting coastal communities and assets require good information about vulnerability to flooding.

Other Reports:

Carbon Farming — A Working Paper Assessing the Potential for Soil C Sequestration
July 23, 2017  — This paper reviews the prospective need for negative emissions in the U.S. and globally, the state of science and technologies relevant to near-term deployment of negative emissions systems, and estimated potentials for agriculture-based processes for negative emissions.
National Survey of Broadcast Meteorologists
March 2016  — The aim of this survey is to explore weathercasters’ views about climate change, and to better understand their interests and activities in reporting on the local impacts of climate change.
Pennsylvania and the Surging Sea
July 2016  — In records running back to 1900, Philadelphia has never seen waterfront flooding that reaches 4 feet above the local high tide line.
National Survey of Broadcast Meteorologists
March 2016  — The aim of this survey is to explore weathercasters’ views about climate change, and to better understand their interests and activities in reporting on the local impacts of climate change.
Human-caused Coastal Floods
February 2016  — Human-caused climate change is contributing to global sea level rise and consequently aggravating coastal floods.
Mapping Choices: Carbon, Climate, and Rising Seas — Our Global Legacy
November 2015  — Carbon emissions causing 4 degrees Celsius of warming (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) — a business-as- usual scenario — could lock in enough eventual sea level rise to submerge land currently home to 470 to 760 million people globally.
Louisiana and the Surging Sea
August 2015  — Low-end sea level projections lead to a greater than even chance of record-breaking floods exceeding 6 feet above the high tide line by 2040 at Grand Isle, Louisiana, on the sinking Mississippi Delta.
Mississippi and the Surging Sea
August 2015  — Low-range sea level projections lead to an even chance of floods exceeding 6 feet above the high tide line by mid-century, at sites across Mississippi’s coastline, exposing nearly $1.5 billion in today’s property.
Alabama and the Surging Sea
August 2015  — Low-range sea level projections lead to an even chance of floods exceeding 6 feet above the high tide line by mid-century at sites across Alabama’s coastline, exposing more than $8 billion in today’s property.
National Survey of Broadcast Meteorologists
April 2015  — The aim of this survey is to explore weathercasters’ views about climate change, and to better understand their interests and activities in reporting on the local impacts of climate change.
Virginia and the Surging Sea
September 2014  — Floods exceeding today’s historic records are likely to take place within the next 20 to 30 years at sites across Virginia under mid-range sea level rise projections.
Maryland and the Surging Sea
September 2014  — An intermediate high sea level rise scenario leads to better than even chances of record-breaking coastal floods within the next 60 years in the Baltimore and Annapolis areas, and as soon as 20 years in other parts of the state.
Washington D.C. and the Surging Sea
September 2014  — Washington, D.C. is likely to see record flooding by 2040 under a mid-range sea level rise scenario. A low-range scenario leads to a better-than-even chance by 2030 of flooding more than 6 feet above the local high tide line – a level topped just once in the last 70 years.
Delaware and the Surging Sea
September 2014  — Under a low-range sea level rise scenario, Delaware is likely to see record-breaking coastal floods within the next 20 years, and near certain to see floods more than 5 feet above the high tide line by 2100.
South Carolina and the Surging Sea
July 21, 2014  — Floods exceeding today’s historic records are likely to take place within the next 20-30 years in the Hilton Head and Myrtle Beach areas, about 3.5 feet above the local high tide line, under mid-range sea level rise projections.
North Carolina and the Surging Sea
July 15, 2014  — Sea levels are rising at an accelerating rate, and the scientific community is confident that global warming is the most important cause.
California, Oregon, Washington and the Surging Sea
June 2014  — Sea levels are rising at an accelerating rate, and the scientific community is confident that global warming is the most important cause.
New England and the Surging Sea
April 2014  — Sea levels are rising at an accelerating rate, and the scientific community is confident that global warming is the most important cause.
Florida and the Surging Sea
April 2014  — Sea levels are rising at an accelerating rate, and the scientific community is confident that global warming is the most important cause.
New York and the Surging Sea
April 2014  — Sea levels are rising at an accelerating rate, and the scientific community is confident that global warming is the most important cause.
New Jersey and the Surging Sea
April 2014  — Sea levels are rising at an accelerating rate, and the scientific community is confident that global warming is the most important cause.
A Roadmap to Climate-Friendly Cars
2013  — An electric car is only as good for the climate as the electricity used to power it. And in states that rely heavily on fossil fuels like coal and natural gas for their electricity there are many conventional and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.
Natural Gas and Climate Change
May 2013  — Knowing how much methane is leaking from the natural gas system is essential to determining the potential climate benefits of natural gas use.
A Roadmap to Climate-Friendly Cars
2012  — America’s high-carbon electricity grid is shortcircuiting efforts to give consumers climate-friendly, electric-vehicle options.
Can U.S. Carbon Emissions Keep Falling
October 2012  — A Climate Central analysis of the American energy economy shows that the nearly 9 percent reduction in annual carbon emissions in the U.S. since 2005 is unlikely to continue in the years ahead without major departures from the ways energy is currently produced and used.
Sea Level Rise Threatens Hundreds of U.S. Energy Facilities
April 2012  — Sea level rise from global warming is well on the way to doubling the risk of coastal floods 4 feet or more over high tide by 2030 at locations nationwide.
Surging Seas
March 14, 2012  — Global warming has raised sea level about eight inches since 1880, and the rate of rise is accelerating. Scientists expect 20 to 80 more inches this century, a lot depending upon how much more heat-trapping pollution humanity puts into the sky.
Surging Seas Factsheets
March 14, 2012  — Simple, quotable information on odds of extreme floods with and without global warming; historic and projected sea level rise; population, homes and land at risk; and towns, cities and counties facing the largest threats; plus research notes and reusable graphics.
National Survey of TV Meteorologists About Climate Change Education
June 2011  — Among the most trusted and familiar sources of informal science education for most Americans, weathercasters are optimally positioned to help enhance public understanding of climate change, including how it is influencing local and regional weather patterns across the United States.