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Meet GROVER: NASA’s New Ice-Loving, Roving Robot

Meet GROVER: NASA’s New Ice-Loving, Roving Robot

The GROVER will initially be operated by scientists at the National Science Foundation’s Summit Camp, where the ice sheet is about 2-miles thick, according to a NASA press release. The robot will be capable of operating at all hours during the 24-hour sunlight that characterizes the Arctic summer.… Read More

Global CO2 Levels Set to Pass 400 ppm Milestone

Global CO2 Levels Set to Pass 400 ppm Milestone

The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has reached 399.72 parts per million (ppm) and is likely to pass the symbolically important 400ppm level for the first time in the next few days. Readings at the U.S. government's Earth Systems Research laboratory in Hawaii, are not expected to reach their 2013 peak until mid May, but were … Read More

Heeding Sandy’s Lessons, Before the Next Big Storm

Heeding Sandy’s Lessons, Before the Next Big Storm

First and foremost, Sandy drove home the need to rethink coastal development practices that encourage growth in vulnerable areas. Second, the storm, which was forecasted well in advance, proved the value of a robust weather and climate forecasting infrastructure at a time of budget austerity.… Read More

Hurricane Sandy’s Untold Filthy Legacy: Sewage

Hurricane Sandy’s Untold Filthy Legacy: Sewage

Hurricane Sandy was the largest storm to hit the northeast U.S. in recorded history, killing 159, knocking out power to millions, and causing $70 billion in damage in eight states. Sandy also put the vulnerability of critical infrastructure in stark relief by paralyzing subways, trains, road and air traffic, flooding hospitals, crippling electrical… Read More

Fast-Moving Climate Zones Are Speeding Extinction

Fast-Moving Climate Zones Are Speeding Extinction

As global temperatures rise, climate zones will shift at greater speed, according to new research in Nature Climate Change. If greenhouse gas emissions carry on increasing, then about 20 percent of the land area of the planet will undergo change – and the creatures that have made their homes in what were once stable ecosystems will have to adapt s… Read More

Warmer Seas May Impact Antarctic Clams’ Reproduction

Warmer Seas May Impact Antarctic Clams’ Reproduction

Antarctic clams (Laternula elliptica) play a vital role in the ocean ecosystem, drawing down carbon into sea-bed sediments and circulating ocean nutrients. Now a new study has found that the reproductive capacity of this long-lived and abundant species — existing in the cold, oxygen-rich waters of the Antarctic — could be seriously affected by … Read More

Boost to Colorado Snowpack May Lessen Wildfire Risk

Boost to Colorado Snowpack May Lessen Wildfire Risk

As recently as late March it appeared that most of the West, including Colorado, was headed for a long, and tinderbox-dry spring and summer, with the effects of a long-running drought becoming ever more apparent in the form of dwindling water supplies and destructive wildfires. Many officials feared a repeat of last year’s disastrous wildfire seaso… Read More

Shale Mining in Great Barrier Reef ‘Likely to be Banned’

Shale Mining in Great Barrier Reef ‘Likely to be Banned’

Mining shale oil under the Great Barrier Reef is likely to be banned by Australia's federal Labor government as tensions rise over the environmental impact of the booming oil and gas industry on the coastline beside the reef. In February, the conservative Queensland state government lifted a moratorium on the shale oil industry in most places alon… Read More