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U.S. Drought Hangs Tough Through January

U.S. Drought Hangs Tough Through January

People all across the West, Plains and Southeast continued to hold their breath this week, as another seven days of below average precipitation and above average temperatures brought no reprieve to the historic drought that has plagued these areas since early last spring. Some areas, such as Texas and Georgia, have been suffering from drought since… Read More

Ozone Hole’s Shifting Winds May Sap Major Carbon Sink

Ozone Hole’s Shifting Winds May Sap Major Carbon Sink

High above Antarctica, the atmosphere is slowly recovering from the decades-long barrage of manmade chemicals that ate a hole in the protective ozone layer. But the legacy of that destruction lingers. Scientists have linked the ozone hole that forms each Antarctic spring, high above Earth, to changes in the fierce band of winds that swirls around… Read More

Deadly Georgia Tornado First in a Record 220 Days

Deadly Georgia Tornado First in a Record 220 Days

The tornadoes were part of a three-day outbreak of severe weather associated with a sprawling storm system that brought spring-like temperatures and humidity to the Midwest and East Coast, along with howling winds on Wednesday night into Thursday. Winds gusted as high as 81 mph in Massachusetts, and topped 60 mph in New York City, where scattered p… Read More

Research Spawns Stunning Hurricane Sandy Animations

Research Spawns Stunning Hurricane Sandy Animations

Mel Shapiro, an atmospheric scientist who studies how tropical storms and hurricanes transition into powerful extratropical storm systems, recently produced a series of astonishing animated visualizations showing the inner workings of Sandy as the storm moved up the Eastern Seaboard and eventually made landfall on the evening of Oct. 29. … Read More

Report Underscores Vulnerabilities of U.S. Coastlines

Report Underscores Vulnerabilities of U.S. Coastlines

No part of the U.S. will escape the harsh consequences of climate change, which has already begun to cause trouble from Alaska to Florida, and from Maine to Hawaii, and which will worsen as the century goes on. But according to a report released January 28, the nation’s coastlines — Atlantic, Gulf, Pacific and Great Lakes — are likely to get the wo… Read More

Scientists Find Bacteria Survive at High Altitudes

Scientists Find Bacteria Survive at High Altitudes

The presence of microorganisms such as bacteria in the upper atmosphere is important because the concentration of microbial cells is known to affect the formation of clouds, whether they be comprised of water droplets, ice crystals, or both.… Read More

Species on the Move Present a Conservation Challenge

Species on the Move Present a Conservation Challenge

The American redstart has an enviable calendar. The tiny songbird spends its winters in Central and South America, then beats the sweltering heat of tropical summers by flying north to breed. For scientists, the globe-trotting habits of migratory species like the redstart pose an immense challenge: As the climate warms, how do you protect a… Read More

Waste Heat From Cities May Be Altering Weather Patterns

Waste Heat From Cities May Be Altering Weather Patterns

The heat that leaks directly into the environment from hot exhaust pipes, boilers and chimneys has also contributed to temperature increases in some places, according to a study published Sunday in Nature Climate Change, especially in winter— not directly, but rather because the waste heat may be altering the flow of the jet stream, and thus the wa… Read More