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Six to See: Slideshow of This Week’s Top Climate News

Six to See: Slideshow of This Week’s Top Climate News

Tracking wildfires, measuring hurricanes and how this wacky weather is effecting the U.S. … Read More

Warmer Climate Threatens Africa’s Vital Cassava Crop

Warmer Climate Threatens Africa’s Vital Cassava Crop

A plant which is a staple food crop for millions of people across Africa is at risk from disease as regional temperatures rise, scientists say. The plant, cassava, is a significant source of food and income, and is an important industrial crop, and there is concern that serious food shortages may result and poverty worsen. Experts say the spread of… Read More

Carbon Dioxide Passes 400 PPM Milestone, NOAA Finds

Carbon Dioxide Passes 400 PPM Milestone, NOAA Finds

Climate scientists recognize this 400 ppm mark as a symbolic milestone, illustrating the rapid increase of human-caused CO2 emissions over the past century. Numerous other climate data, gleaned from ice cores, ocean sediment, and other sources show that this is the highest CO2 concentration in the air in all of modern human history, possibly as far… Read More

In Parched Southwest, Anxious Wait for Summer Rains

In Parched Southwest, Anxious Wait for Summer Rains

However, if the past two summer monsoon seasons are any guide to what’s ahead, meaningful drought relief may be wishful thinking. “Another dry monsoon could be devastating,” said Victor Murphy, a climate services program manager with the National Weather Service.… Read More

Jet Stream Enhances Drought in West, Midwest Relief

Jet Stream Enhances Drought in West, Midwest Relief

A week of wild and unusual weather brought a combination of record cold, snow flurries, heavy rains and 90-degree heat to different parts of the U.S. As a result of this weather pattern, which was characterized by a topsy turvy jet stream that caused storm systems to inch across the country, drought shrank in some places and grew in others, but the… Read More

Greenland’s Ice Loss May Slow, But Coasts Still At Risk

Greenland’s Ice Loss May Slow, But Coasts Still At Risk

The flow of Greenland’s glaciers toward the sea may have increased significantly in the past decade, but a new report in Nature finds that rate of increase is unlikely to continue. “The loss of ice has doubled in the past 10 years, but it’s not going to double again,” said lead author Faezeh Nick, a glaciologist at the University Centre in Svalbard… Read More

Hawaii at Growing Risk of Hurricanes, Studies Show

Hawaii at Growing Risk of Hurricanes, Studies Show

The new study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, found that environmental conditions will become more favorable for tropical cyclones in and around the Hawaiian islands by 2075-2099. That’s due, in part, to a northwestward shift in the tropical cyclone track as well as increased ocean temperatures in the central tropical Pacific, whic… Read More

Scientists Develop New Way of Classifying Hurricanes

Scientists Develop New Way of Classifying Hurricanes

For the past 40 years, the Saffir-Simpson Scale has been used to neatly classify all hurricanes into five categories. The scale, created by Herbert Saffir and Robert Simpson in the early 70s, is simple. It measures a storm’s maximum sustained wind speed — no more, no less.… Read More