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Ice Melt Means Uneven Sea Level Rise Around the World

Ice Melt Means Uneven Sea Level Rise Around the World

Scientists say the sea level rise caused by climate change during the rest of this century will not affect all parts of the world equally, because of the ways sea, land and ice interact. They say parts of the Pacific are likely to see the highest rise. This region is where many low-lying island countries most vulnerable to sea level rise, like the … Read More

Time Is Running Out to Avert a Third Summer of Drought

Time Is Running Out to Avert a Third Summer of Drought

Meanwhile, the economic toll of the worst drought to strike the U.S. since at least the 1950s is climbing, and it “will probably end up being a top-five disaster event” among the government’s ranking of all weather disasters over the past three decades, said Brad Rippey, a meteorologist in the Agriculture Department’s Office of the Chief Economist,… Read More

Nearing a Tipping Point on Melting Permafrost?

Nearing a Tipping Point on Melting Permafrost?

Nearly a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere’s land surface is covered in permanently frozen soil, or permafrost, which is filled with carbon-rich plant debris — enough to double the amount of heat-trapping carbon in the atmosphere if the permafrost all melted and the organic matter decomposed. According to a paper published Thursday in Science, … Read More

Warming Climate Yields Another Hot January: NOAA

Warming Climate Yields Another Hot January: NOAA

The Northern Hemisphere saw above-average snow cover extent for January, with the sixth largest in the 47-year record, or 730,000 square miles above the 1967-2013 average. The western U.S., eastern China, and much of Europe had above-average January snow cover. While winter Northern Hemisphere snow cover has grown at a rate of about 0.1 percent per… Read More

Spring Chill Sends Monarchs Fluttering North

Spring Chill Sends Monarchs Fluttering North

For scientists, the annual migration of Monarch butterflies from Canada to Mexico and back again has been as mysterious as it is beautiful. Each autumn, the brilliant orange-and-black insects converge on fir and pine forests in Mexico’s Sierra Madre mountains, where they spend the winter in a kind of hibernation until spring comes. Researchers… Read More

Warming Winters: U.S. Temperature Trends

Warming Winters: U.S. Temperature Trends

While the U.S. has seen a warming trend that has raised temperatures by 1.3°F over the past 100 years, warming varies seasonally, and it’s winter that has seen the fastest warming. An analysis of data from the U.S. Historical Climatology Network of weather stations shows that the coldest states are warming the fastest, and across the country winter… Read More

Halve Meat Consumption, Scientists Urge Rich World

Halve Meat Consumption, Scientists Urge Rich World

People in the rich world should become "demitarians" – eating half as much meat as usual, while stopping short of giving it up – in order to avoid severe environmental damage, scientists have urged, in the clearest picture yet of how farming practices are destroying the natural world. They said the horsemeat scandal had uncovered the dark side of … Read More

Making Malaria Easier to Track Using Temp Data

Making Malaria Easier to Track Using Temp Data

Their work has potentially far-reaching implications because it will improve scientists‘ ability to map where malaria is likely to occur. Knowing this could help to improve malaria control and mitigation strategies in tropical and sub-tropical regions. This could save many lives as climate change develops. The study, published in Nature Scientific… Read More