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More Frequent Heat Waves by 2020 ‘Almost Certain’

More Frequent Heat Waves by 2020 ‘Almost Certain’

Stand by for extreme weather. Prepare for heat waves on a scale that was once unprecedented. For once, there are no “ifs” in the forecast, no caveats about modeling business-as-usual-scenarios rather than dramatic reductions of emissions for near-term warming Even if governments abandon fossil fuels everywhere, immediately, and invest only in gree… Read More

Fracking In Spotlight in Texas as Ample Oil, No Water

Fracking In Spotlight in Texas as Ample Oil, No Water

Beverly McGuire saw the warning signs before the town well went dry: sand in the toilet bowl, the sputter of air in the tap, a pump working overtime to no effect. But it still did not prepare her for the night last month when she turned on the tap and discovered the tiny town where she had made her home for 35 years was out of water. "The day that … Read More

Climate Change May Be Easing Devastating 2012 Drought

Climate Change May Be Easing Devastating 2012 Drought

Early this week, when Colorado State Climatologist Nolan Doesken toured an area of southeast Colorado hit hardest by the drought of 2012, he was greeted with a vast expanse of parched farmland that had turned into a moonscape with almost no vegetation. That area along the Arkansas River hadn’t seen much rainfall in nearly three years, a long dry … Read More

Can Extreme Weather Make Climate Change Worse?

Can Extreme Weather Make Climate Change Worse?

Devastating drought in the Southwest, unprecedented wildfire activity, scorching heat waves and other extreme weather are often cited as signs of a changing climate. But what if those extreme weather events themselves cause more extreme weather events, fueling climate change? That’s one of the possibilities raised by a study released Wednesday … Read More

Wet, Wetter, Wettest Makes July No. 5 in Record Books

Wet, Wetter, Wettest Makes July No. 5 in Record Books

Extremes in precipitation was the weather big story of July 2013, with last month ranking as the fifth-wettest July on record nationwide, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s monthly weather summary report released Tuesday.… Read More

This Is What Global Warming Looks Like

This Is What Global Warming Looks Like

Global warming has accelerated during the past three decades, which have each been unusually warm. In fact, the most recent decade, from 2001-2010, was the warmest since instrumental records began in 1850, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). While the rate of global warming has slowed in the past several years, possibly due … Read More

150 Years in 30 Seconds: Sea Level Debt Sinking U.S. Cities

150 Years in 30 Seconds: Sea Level Debt Sinking U.S. Cities

Measurements tell us that global average sea level is currently rising by about 1 inch per decade. But in an invisible shadow process, our long-term sea level rise commitment or "lock-in" — the sea level rise we don’t see now, but which carbon emissions and warming have locked in for later years — is growing 10 times faster, and this growth rate is… Read More

Relocation of Alaska’s Sinking Newtok Village Halted

Relocation of Alaska’s Sinking Newtok Village Halted

Newtok, on the Bering Sea coast, is sinking and the highest point in the village – the school which sits perched atop 20-foot pilings - could be underwater by 2017. But the village's relocation effort broke down this summer because of an internal political conflict and a freeze on governmen… Read More