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Climate Change Could Melt Everest Region’s Glaciers

Climate Change Could Melt Everest Region’s Glaciers

The Dudh Koshi basin spans 1 million acres and includes some of world’s tallest peaks including Mount Everest. Glaciers tumble down from the highest reaches to the valleys below, shaping the landscape and culture of the region. But climate change has the jagged tongues of ice that define the region primed for a major meltdown. A new study … Read More

10 Years After Katrina, Slow Hurricane Season Expected

10 Years After Katrina, Slow Hurricane Season Expected

As the 10th anniversary of the busiest hurricane season on record approaches, forecasters and government officials are preparing for the start of the 2015 season. But unlike the 2005 season, which saw an unprecedented 28 storms — including one of the worst, Hurricane Katrina — this season is expected to see fewer than the average number of… Read More

Across U.S., Heaviest Downpours On The Rise

Across U.S., Heaviest Downpours On The Rise

Record-breaking rain across Texas and Oklahoma this week caused widespread flooding, the likes of which the region has rarely, if ever, seen. For seven locations there, May 2015 has seen the most rain of any month ever recorded, with five days to go and the rain still coming. While rainfall in the region is consistent with the emerging El Niño, the… Read More

U.S., Mexico, Canada to Collaborate on Climate Adaptation

U.S., Mexico, Canada to Collaborate on Climate Adaptation

Upgrading power grids, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to climate change are on the agenda for a new international working group composed of the three national energy ministers in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Canadian Minister of Natural Resources Greg Rickford, and Mexico Secretary of Energy … Read More

America’s Future Has Wind in its Sails

America’s Future Has Wind in its Sails

As reducing greenhouse gas emissions to slow a changing climate becomes more urgent, though, wind is expected to become one of the country’s largest sources of energy by mid-century. The U.S. Department of Energy has published two new maps that put that future in more concrete terms. The first is part of a report released this spring showing how … Read More

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

A global weather phenomenon could cause a famine in the Sahel this year by combining with already dry conditions to create a “double whammy” for the region, scientists and aid groups have warned. Professor Adam Scaife, a long term forecaster at the UK Met Office Hadley Centre, said models now agreed an El Niño event was likely and the first impact… Read More

Moderately Cold Temps ‘More Deadly Than Heat Waves’

Moderately Cold Temps ‘More Deadly Than Heat Waves’

Heat waves are not as deadly as has been assumed, according to research that suggests prolonged exposure to moderately cold temperatures kills more people than scorching or freezing spells. The study of deaths in 13 countries, published in the Lancet medical journal, found that cold weather kills 20 times as many people as hot weather, and that … Read More

‘Paving’ the Way: First Commercial Use for Toner Waste

‘Paving’ the Way: First Commercial Use for Toner Waste

A new, more environmentally friendly asphalt mix containing recycled printer toner is being used on Sydney’s roads. The technology is the world’s first commercial use for toner waste, and was first used in Melbourne in 2013. Called TonerPave, it was developed by the city’s road contractor, Downer, in partnership with a cartridge recycling company.… Read More

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More U.S. Downpours Nationwide, the number of days with the most intense precipitation continues to climb.

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