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Spring May Arrive Five Weeks Earlier by 2100, Study Finds

Spring May Arrive Five Weeks Earlier by 2100, Study Finds

The biological onset of spring could arrive up to five weeks earlier by 2100 in the northern U.S. than it does today, and more than a week earlier in the South, a change that could significantly alter ecosystems from Florida to Maine, according to a paper published in Geophysical Research Letters. “This is a big deal,” said lead author … Read More

Offshore Wind Turbines at Risk from Destructive Waves

Offshore Wind Turbines at Risk from Destructive Waves

Offshore wind turbines are vulnerable to sudden and catastrophic destruction in moderately stormy seas, according to new research. Wind turbines are at constant but unpredictable risk of being snapped in pieces like matchsticks by medium-sized waves, a researcher has found. "The problem is, we still do not know exactly when the turbines may break… Read More

New Study: ‘World Can End Poverty and Limit Warming’

New Study: ‘World Can End Poverty and Limit Warming’

Eradicating poverty by making modern energy supplies available to everyone is not only compatible with measures to slow climate change, a new study says. It is a necessary condition for it. But the authors say the plan to provide sustainable energy worldwide will not by itself be enough to keep the global average temperature rise below the widely… Read More

Shell to Suspend Arctic Offshore Drilling Program

Shell to Suspend Arctic Offshore Drilling Program

Shell shut down its 2013 drilling season in the Arctic waters off Alaska on Wednesday, after a series of mishaps and mechanical failures. The oil company said in a statement it was putting its operations off the coast of Alaska on pause for 2013, but remained committed to drilling at a later stage. The decision raises further doubts about the futu… Read More

Glaciers in the Himalayas Are Retreating—But Why?

Glaciers in the Himalayas Are Retreating—But Why?

Mohan Bdr. Chand is at the sharp end of glacier research. A climate researcher at Kathmandu University, Chand is carrying out vital field work, looking at high mountain glaciers as indicators of climate change. The work involves spending time clambering up and down the ice, taking measurements and readings to calculate mass balance - the sum of th… Read More

Remarkable Summer in Australia Is its Hottest On Record

Remarkable Summer in Australia Is its Hottest On Record

The scientists said the heat this summer was particularly striking, because it occurred without the warming influence of an El Niño event in the tropical Pacific Ocean. El Niño conditions, which are characterized by warmer than average sea surface temperatures in the equatorial tropical Pacific, can alter weather patterns worldwide. … Read More

Heavy Rains, Snow Bring First Hint of Good Drought News

Heavy Rains, Snow Bring First Hint of Good Drought News

There was a net decline in all categories of drought across the lower 48 states during the week ending on Feb. 26. Most of the drought relief was confined to the Southeast and Southern Plains. In the Southeast, the total area in moderate drought or worse plummeted from 43.76 percent down to 27.26 percent in just one week.… Read More

Dusty Springs in Asia, Africa Can Increase Snow in Calif.

Dusty Springs in Asia, Africa Can Increase Snow in Calif.

A dusty spring in Asia and Africa can increase snowfall thousands of miles away in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains, according to a new study. The process begins when winds stir up tiny particles of dust, pollution, bacteria and heavy metals from the Taklimakan and Gobi deserts in Asia and the Sahara in northern Africa. In a matter of days, … Read More