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Severe Storms Bring More ‘Weather Whiplash’ to U.S.

Severe Storms Bring More ‘Weather Whiplash’ to U.S.

On a weather map, Oklahoma appears to be divided into two states. Following multiple rounds of heavy rains and severe thunderstorms, central and eastern Oklahoma have erased the drought conditions that had parched the landscape since 2010. Yet extreme drought conditions continue to plague the more sparsely populated Oklahoma Panhandle.… Read More

Extreme Weather Events in U.S. Carry Heavy Price Tag

Extreme Weather Events in U.S. Carry Heavy Price Tag

America has some of the wildest weather on the planet, and it turns out those extremes – which run from heat waves and tornadoes to floods, hurricanes and droughts – carry a heavy price tag. Climate studies have associated more frequent and intense weather events – such as heavy storms and heat waves – with climate change. The wild swings in weath… Read More

Panama’s Indigenous People Reject UN Forest Plan

Panama’s Indigenous People Reject UN Forest Plan

Indigenous people in Panama are asking the United Nations to close down its global forestry program, REDD, in their country. REDD – Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation – is designed to slow climate change by preventing the destruction of the world’s most vulnerable forests. It is a key part of the UN’s attempts to tackle a… Read More

Severe Storms, Water Woes and Hurricane Season

Severe Storms, Water Woes and Hurricane Season

How climate change changes everything dominates the slideshow of the week’s top climate news. … Read More

Warmer Seas Could Lead to More Dolphin Deaths

Warmer Seas Could Lead to More Dolphin Deaths

Dead dolphins and rotting fish could become a frequent feature on South Australian beaches due to warming seas. Record high sea surface temperatures from summer to April caused thousands of small fish to wash up dead in SA gulf waters. It stressed 33 dolphins to the point they succumbed to a virus normally suppressed by immunity. Biosecurity SA aqu… Read More

NOAA Satellite May Be Back Online Soon, Official Says

NOAA Satellite May Be Back Online Soon, Official Says

“It doesn’t appear that there was any damage or any problem with any of the instruments on board,” said Capt. Debora Barr, acting deputy director of NOAA's Office of Satellite and Product Operations in Suitland, MD, in an interview. … Read More

As Hurricane Season Starts, U.S. Facing Heightened Risk

As Hurricane Season Starts, U.S. Facing Heightened Risk

The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season starts Saturday, and scientists are warning that it is likely to be a doozy, with more storms than average and more major hurricanes (Category 3 intensity or stronger). Not only are forecasters calling for an unusually active season, they also say that there are signs that the U.S., which hasn’t had a major hurric… Read More

Bill Would Shift NOAA Resources from Climate Research

Bill Would Shift NOAA Resources from Climate Research

A bill being drafted in the House could potentially undermine the climate science research activities and the oceans programs of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). It also would open up the weather satellite sector, which has been a troubled area for NOAA in recent years, to more private competition.… Read More