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Wildfires Are Ruining the National Park Service’s Birthday

Wildfires Are Ruining the National Park Service’s Birthday

In honor of the agency’s 99th birthday, the National Park Service is offering free entrance to its 58 parks and 350 other sites. In the Pacific Northwest and Northern Rockies, park visitors might also be hoping that entry comes with a free respirator and x-ray vision. Smoke from large wildfires is obscuring some of the stunning vistas that inspired… Read More

The Climate Change ‘Bully’ in California’s Drought

The Climate Change ‘Bully’ in California’s Drought

There’s a drought in California. Perhaps you’ve heard a few things about it. Like the fact that it’s cost the state $2.7 billion in losses, helped burn up roughly 118,000 acres of forest this year to-date and inspired Los Angeles to release a 96 million-strong armada of shade balls into reservoirs (though it was apparently a PR stunt). Oh, and the … Read More

El Niño Could Rank Among Strongest on Record

El Niño Could Rank Among Strongest on Record

This year’s El Niño is poised to join the ranks of the strongest such events on record, U.S. forecasters said Thursday, with potentially significant impacts for weather across the country this winter. “We’re predicting that this El Niño could be among the strongest El Niños in the historical record dating back to 1950,” Mike Halpert, the deputy… Read More

Scientists Foresee Losses as Cities Fight Beach Erosion

Scientists Foresee Losses as Cities Fight Beach Erosion

Beaches are facing off against a changing climate, and they’re losing ground. Literally. Waves, currents, storms and people all move the sand that make beaches, well, beaches. But a combination of rising sea levels, stronger coastal storms and coastal development means that sandy shorelines are increasingly disappearing, leaving the millions who … Read More

Heat Continues to Roast West, Fueling Drought, Blazes

Heat Continues to Roast West, Fueling Drought, Blazes

The U.S. West was once again a land of extremes in July. From Alaska to the Pacific Northwest, July was unusually hot, with some spots recording daily and monthly heat records, while other parts of California got a rare deluge. The heat across much of the West has done no favors for the deep drought and has helped to fuel a surge in wildfires… Read More

Hawaii May Say ‘Aloha’ to More Hurricanes

Hawaii May Say ‘Aloha’ to More Hurricanes

For the second summer in a row, a tropical cyclone is headed toward Hawaii, a relative rarity for the island chain. But in a warming world, the 50th state could face more tropical storms and hurricanes, some research suggests, with one new study finding that climate change upped the odds of last year’s spate of storms. Though Hawaii is a tropical… Read More

All of 2015’s Rain for the U.S. in 14 Seconds

All of 2015’s Rain for the U.S. in 14 Seconds

It’s no secret that it has been really wet in the Southeast and really dry out West over the first half of the year. But to really understand the split and how we got here, NASA has a helpful, color recap of the year in rain. The imagery comes courtesy of the agency’s Global Precipitation Measurement constellation of satellites. In February last … Read More

Missing: One Year’s Worth of California Rain

Missing: One Year’s Worth of California Rain

The amount of rain that California has missed out on since the beginning of its record-setting drought in 2012 is about the same amount it would see, on average, in a single year, a new study has concluded. The study’s researchers pin the reason for the lack of rains, as others have, on the absence of the intense rainstorms ushered in by so-called… Read More

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Global Warming: It’s Not the Sun Climate change can be natural, but what’s happening now can’t be explained by natural forces.

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