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Atlantic Storm Sets Records as 3 Others Span Pacific

Atlantic Storm Sets Records as 3 Others Span Pacific

Tropical Storm Erika may have fizzled out, leaving Florida’s 10-year hurricane-free streak still running, but there is plenty of other tropical cyclone activity afoot: Once again this year, there is a string of storms spanning the Pacific, while over in the Atlantic, a hurricane has formed further east in the tropics than any other on record.… Read More

From Katrina, an ‘Amazing’ Decade of Climate Research

From Katrina, an ‘Amazing’ Decade of Climate Research

During the summer of 2005, Columbia University climate scientists Adam Sobel and Suzana Camargo were planning a workshop on a topic to which only a handful of scientists had given much thought: how the warming climate might alter hurricane activity. “It seemed to us sort of like a small, sort of obscure field,” Sobel said, so the pair didn’t … Read More

Alyson Kenward Talks ‘Danger Days’ on WVM Radio

Alyson Kenward Talks ‘Danger Days’ on WVM Radio

Our senior scientist and research director, Alyson Kenward, spoke with West Virginia Morning's Ashton Marra about the high number of "danger days" that West Virginia's capital city, Charleston, will face as the world warms. Climate change is about to make danger days a lot more common over the next 15 years. Charleston, W.Va., for example, is set… Read More

10 Years Later: Was Warming to Blame for Katrina?

10 Years Later: Was Warming to Blame for Katrina?

In the days after Aug. 29, 2005, when the world watched Hurricane Katrina become one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history, a question reverberated through the public consciousness: Was climate change to blame? This question arose in part because of a desire after such terrible events to understand why they occur. … Read More

Tropical Storm Erika Could Hit Florida By Monday

Tropical Storm Erika Could Hit Florida By Monday

It may just be a dot on the map, but it could be an historic one. Florida has entered the cone of probability in the latest forecast for Tropical Storm Erika. The forecast, from the National Hurricane Center, shows that Erika could make landfall in South Florida. That would end an unprecedented 10-year hurricane drought in Florida, a state that … Read More

Katrina: Lasting Climate Lessons for a Sinking City

Katrina: Lasting Climate Lessons for a Sinking City

This week marks a decade since Hurricane Katrina spun violently toward the coasts of Louisiana and Mississippi, ravaging both states when it barreled ashore on Aug. 29, 2005. Katrina taught New Orleans and the Gulf Coast many lessons about how vulnerable the region is to natural disaster, especially to sea level rise and storm surge made worse by … Read More

Wildfires Are Ruining the National Park Service’s Birthday

Wildfires Are Ruining the National Park Service’s Birthday

In honor of the agency’s 99th birthday, the National Park Service is offering free entrance to its 58 parks and 350 other sites. In the Pacific Northwest and Northern Rockies, park visitors might also be hoping that entry comes with a free respirator and x-ray vision. Smoke from large wildfires is obscuring some of the stunning vistas that inspired… Read More

Drought-Fueled Wildfires Burn 7 Million Acres in U.S.

Drought-Fueled Wildfires Burn 7 Million Acres in U.S.

Sap a forest of rain — say, for three or four years — toss in seemingly endless sunshine and high temperatures, and you’ve got just the right recipe for some catastrophic wildfires. Such is the story playing out in the West, where, thanks in part to climate change, drought-fueled infernos are incinerating forests at a record pace from Alaska to … Read More

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Washington, DC: July Days Over 90 Degrees By mid-century in Washington, DC, the the sweltering heat of July 2010 may be thought of as cooler-than-average conditions

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