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What Climate Change Means for Your Coffee

What Climate Change Means for Your Coffee

Coffee — the black liquid that kick-starts the day for billions of people each morning — is one of our most precious global commodities. But as this video from Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew explains, it’s also under threat from a changing climate. “Although there are now 125 species of coffee, we only actually use two species to produce the beverage c… Read More

Picture This: Fire Clouds & A Slew of Pacific Storms

Picture This: Fire Clouds & A Slew of Pacific Storms

The weather has provided extreme bookends to the week, with a 1-in-500 year rainfall event washing out Mt. Baldy, Calif., in the middle of what is supposed to be the dry season, while a hurricane bore down on Hawaii for the first time in 22 years. The thunderstorms that unleashed the rains on California also produced lots of lightning that sparked… Read More

Why Hurricanes Are So Rare in Hawaii

Why Hurricanes Are So Rare in Hawaii

The last time a hurricane was bearing down on the Hawaiian Islands, Steven Spielberg was on Kauaʻi finishing filming of the now iconic movie “Jurassic Park” when Hurricane Iniki hit the island as a Category 4 storm. Now — 22 years later — not one, but an unprecedented two hurricanes are making a beeline for the island chain and residents are… Read More

Forecasters Lower Hurricane Season Expectations

Forecasters Lower Hurricane Season Expectations

Hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean basin is likely to be even more lackluster for the remainder of the season than forecasters originally thought when it began on June 1. Forces like cool ocean waters and a stable atmospheric environment are keeping storms from forming and growing, and the El Nino that is faltering but still expected to… Read More

87 Cities, 4 Scenarios and 1 Really Hot Future

87 Cities, 4 Scenarios and 1 Really Hot Future

Global temperatures are rising, but nothing brings global warming home to people like a really hot summer day — those few days a year when it actually feels like the planet is boiling over. But what if those rare sweltering days, over 90° or 100°F, were not so rare and began to dominate summers? That could happen if carbon emissions continue … Read More

See Power Plants Most Vulnerable to Flooding

See Power Plants Most Vulnerable to Flooding

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s new mapping tool announced Wednesday shows how a flood could drown the some of the nation’s most critical energy infrastructure — power plants, oil and gas wells, solar power installations, and other infrastructure.… Read More

Tornado Outbreaks Could Have a Climate Change Assist

Tornado Outbreaks Could Have a Climate Change Assist

Days with more tornadoes have become more common over the past 60 years, a trend that new research says could have a climate change connection. Understanding the connection between climate change and tornadoes, if any, is one of the most fraught areas of research. But a study released Wednesday posits that changes in heat and moisture content in t… Read More

Putting a Climate Context on SoCal’s Flash Floods

Putting a Climate Context on SoCal’s Flash Floods

A confluence of extreme atmospheric conditions over Southern California, possibly with an assist from the intense drought in the state, set the stage for the torrential rains and flash flooding that washed away cars and homes in some areas like Mt. Baldy on Sunday. And while the U.S. Southwest is expected to increasingly dry out in a warming… Read More