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10 Years After Katrina, Slow Hurricane Season Expected

10 Years After Katrina, Slow Hurricane Season Expected

As the 10th anniversary of the busiest hurricane season on record approaches, forecasters and government officials are preparing for the start of the 2015 season. But unlike the 2005 season, which saw an unprecedented 28 storms — including one of the worst, Hurricane Katrina — this season is expected to see fewer than the average number of… Read More

Across U.S., Heaviest Downpours On The Rise

Across U.S., Heaviest Downpours On The Rise

Record-breaking rain across Texas and Oklahoma this week caused widespread flooding, the likes of which the region has rarely, if ever, seen. For seven locations there, May 2015 has seen the most rain of any month ever recorded, with five days to go and the rain still coming. While rainfall in the region is consistent with the emerging El Niño, the… Read More

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

A global weather phenomenon could cause a famine in the Sahel this year by combining with already dry conditions to create a “double whammy” for the region, scientists and aid groups have warned. Professor Adam Scaife, a long term forecaster at the UK Met Office Hadley Centre, said models now agreed an El Niño event was likely and the first impact… Read More

Monsoon Sets Up ‘Race Against the Clock’ in Nepal

Monsoon Sets Up ‘Race Against the Clock’ in Nepal

The prospect of aftershocks continue to keep Nepal on edge after a major earthquake shook the country in late April. The magnitude 7.8 earthquake and its aftershocks have left an estimated 500,000 families homeless, more than 8,000 dead and scarred the country with at least 3,000 landslides. But another issue for quake-rattled Nepal is brewing … Read More

Texas, Oklahoma Drought ‘All But Over’

Texas, Oklahoma Drought ‘All But Over’

While the Western drought has its claws firmly dug in, the nearly five-year drought that has gripped Oklahoma and Texas is on its last legs, thanks to recent torrents of rain, government climate scientists said Thursday. “I think the Texas drought is pretty much all but over,” Victor Murphy, climate services program manager for the National Weather… Read More

Take a Look at One of the First Climate Models In Action

Take a Look at One of the First Climate Models In Action

Climate models, they just don’t make ‘em like they used to. Of course, that may not be a bad thing. Like an Atari to an Xbox One, a Nokia brick to an iPhone 6, climate models have come a long way since their early predecessors. In a video recently published by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, you can see just much of an update computer-run models … Read More

Climate Change May Put Power Grid at Risk in the West

Climate Change May Put Power Grid at Risk in the West

The ravages of climate change could severely hurt the ability of utilities in the 11 Western states to generate power unless they “climate proof” their power grid using renewables and energy efficiency, something they are not prepared for, according to a new study. For nearly half of the West’s existing power plants, climate change could reduce … Read More

Washington’s ‘Wet Drought’ Gets Worse

Washington’s ‘Wet Drought’ Gets Worse

With its snowpack at abysmal levels and some streams recording record low flows, Washington is perhaps looking at a worse drought than it anticipated even a month ago. The impacts already being seen prompted Gov. Jay Inslee on Friday to expanded an emergency drought declaration to cover the whole state. “We’re really starting to feel the pain from… Read More

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Spring Precipitation Trends Average precipitation during meteorological spring hasn't changed much since 1970.

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