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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Picture This: U.S. Cities Under 12 feet of Sea Level Rise

Picture This: U.S. Cities Under 12 feet of Sea Level Rise

Maps are one way to understand what collapse of West Antarctic glaciers could eventually mean. Photos show it another way. In 2013, Climate Central shared some of its sea level rise mapping data with artist Nickolay Lamm so that he could develop photorealistic images of U.S. city scenes under different future scenarios. One scenario was 12 feet of… Read More

Melt of Key Antarctic Glaciers ‘Unstoppable,’ Studies Find

Melt of Key Antarctic Glaciers ‘Unstoppable,’ Studies Find

Sea level rise estimates are going to need to be revised upward: A portion of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet that is home to some of the fastest-flowing glaciers on the continent appears to have entered a state of retreat and melt that is “unstoppable,” two new studies have found. “It has passed the point of no return,” said Eric Rignot, lead… Read More

Dam It: Feds Say U.S. Can Double Hydropower

Dam It: Feds Say U.S. Can Double Hydropower

The DOE study suggests America’s rivers are troves of vast untapped hydropower potential and developing many of them could help combat climate change by helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation using fossil fuels.… Read More

Winter Won’t Let Go: Great Lakes Still on Ice

Winter Won’t Let Go: Great Lakes Still on Ice

April has come and gone but a record amount of ice still remains on the Great Lakes. This April was the lakes’ iciest on record after a near-record winter, and the season has been notable for how early ice formed and how long it’s lingered. At the close of April, nearly a quarter of the five Great Lakes -- the largest group of lakes on Earth -- st… Read More

Storm Surge Could Flood NYC 1 in Every 4 Years

Storm Surge Could Flood NYC 1 in Every 4 Years

When a storm, such as Hurricane Sandy, sets waters in New York Harbor rising, those sloshing seas are now 20 times more likely to overtop the Manhattan seawall than 170 years ago, a new study finds. The increased risk comes from a combination of sea level rise — which has raised water levels near New York City by nearly 1.5 feet since the mid-… Read More

At-Risk Cities May Help Drive Climate Change Solutions

At-Risk Cities May Help Drive Climate Change Solutions

It is already taking shape as the 21st century urban nightmare: a big storm hits a city like Shanghai, Mumbai, Miami or New York, knocking out power supply and waste treatment plants, washing out entire neighborhoods and marooning the survivors in a toxic and foul-smelling swamp. Now the world's leading scientists are suggesting that those same cit… Read More

Rising CO2 Levels Threaten Entire Marine Food Chain

Rising CO2 Levels Threaten Entire Marine Food Chain

Escalating carbon dioxide emissions will cause fish to lose their fear of predators, potentially damaging the entire marine food chain, joint Australian and U.S. research has found. A study by the Australian Institute of Marine Science, James Cook University and the Georgia Institute of Technology found the behavior of fish would be “seriously aff… Read More

Why California’s Drought Isn’t Going Anywhere

Why California’s Drought Isn’t Going Anywhere

Week after week, the drabs of good news have been as rare as the rain. And that won’t change anytime soon. California is in the midst of a crushing severe multi-year drought brought on by cumulative winters with a dearth of replenishing rains and snows and an ever-growing population. Climate patterns may be in the early stages of aligning to quench… Read More