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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Roaring Video Shows Record Flood at Brazil’s Iguazu Falls

Roaring Video Shows Record Flood at Brazil’s Iguazu Falls

Heavy rains have inundated parts of southern Brazil and northern Argentina and Uruguay, driving severe flooding across the region. Video from Igazu Falls, one of South America’s natural wonders, puts the scope of that flooding into perspective. The falls are a UNESCO World Heritage Site that sits on the border of Brazil and Argentina. A video post… Read More

El Niño Could Spell Disaster for Coral Reefs

El Niño Could Spell Disaster for Coral Reefs

A growing number of scientists are predicting a major El Niño weather event this year, which could wreak havoc across South America and Asia as droughts, floods and other extreme weather events hit industry and farming. But the impacts on the world’s coral reefs could be even more disastrous. The last big El Niño in 1997/98 caused the worst coral … Read More

Climate Could Spell the End for the Cutthroat Trout

Climate Could Spell the End for the Cutthroat Trout

Any Montana angler worth a double-haul cast knows that the iconic state fish, the westslope cutthroat trout, has been crowded out by the non-native rainbow trout, first introduced to these rivers by well-meaning sportsmen in the 1880s. Now those invaders are taking over the cutthroat's gene pool, too. A new study tracks just how rapidly cross-breed… Read More

Drought Prompts Fear of Blackouts at World Cup

Drought Prompts Fear of Blackouts at World Cup

Although recent rains have brought some relief, many parts of Brazil are in the grip of the most severe drought for years, and temperatures have been unusually high. In many areas, reservoirs at hydro plants – which produce about 70 percent of Brazil’s power – are at record lows. São Paulo state in the south-east, where the World Cup’s opening game… Read More

6 Degrees: Kinky Rails, Rains, CO2 Emissions & More

6 Degrees: Kinky Rails, Rains, CO2 Emissions & More

Sun kinks warp railroads, CO2 emissions enter space age, rains and floods all top climate news this week. … Read More

Cold U.S. Winter Caused By Warm Tropical Waters?

Cold U.S. Winter Caused By Warm Tropical Waters?

The Polar Vortex got all the blame for the frigid winter that held much of the eastern U.S. in its icy grip this year, but the wild kinks in the jet stream that sent that cold air southward may be due to thunderstorm activity half a world away, one scientist says. The first four months of 2014 in the U.S. were the coldest such period the country… Read More

Picture This: U.S. Cities Under 12 feet of Sea Level Rise

Picture This: U.S. Cities Under 12 feet of Sea Level Rise

Maps are one way to understand what collapse of West Antarctic glaciers could eventually mean. Photos show it another way. In 2013, Climate Central shared some of its sea level rise mapping data with artist Nickolay Lamm so that he could develop photorealistic images of U.S. city scenes under different future scenarios. One scenario was 12 feet of… Read More

Melt of Key Antarctic Glaciers ‘Unstoppable,’ Studies Find

Melt of Key Antarctic Glaciers ‘Unstoppable,’ Studies Find

Sea level rise estimates are going to need to be revised upward: A portion of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet that is home to some of the fastest-flowing glaciers on the continent appears to have entered a state of retreat and melt that is “unstoppable,” two new studies have found. “It has passed the point of no return,” said Eric Rignot, lead… Read More