News Section
Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Drought Prompts Fear of Blackouts at World Cup

Drought Prompts Fear of Blackouts at World Cup

Although recent rains have brought some relief, many parts of Brazil are in the grip of the most severe drought for years, and temperatures have been unusually high. In many areas, reservoirs at hydro plants – which produce about 70 percent of Brazil’s power – are at record lows. São Paulo state in the south-east, where the World Cup’s opening game… Read More

6 Degrees: Kinky Rails, Rains, CO2 Emissions & More

6 Degrees: Kinky Rails, Rains, CO2 Emissions & More

Sun kinks warp railroads, CO2 emissions enter space age, rains and floods all top climate news this week. … Read More

Cold U.S. Winter Caused By Warm Tropical Waters?

Cold U.S. Winter Caused By Warm Tropical Waters?

The Polar Vortex got all the blame for the frigid winter that held much of the eastern U.S. in its icy grip this year, but the wild kinks in the jet stream that sent that cold air southward may be due to thunderstorm activity half a world away, one scientist says. The first four months of 2014 in the U.S. were the coldest such period the country… Read More

Picture This: U.S. Cities Under 12 feet of Sea Level Rise

Picture This: U.S. Cities Under 12 feet of Sea Level Rise

Maps are one way to understand what collapse of West Antarctic glaciers could eventually mean. Photos show it another way. In 2013, Climate Central shared some of its sea level rise mapping data with artist Nickolay Lamm so that he could develop photorealistic images of U.S. city scenes under different future scenarios. One scenario was 12 feet of… Read More

Melt of Key Antarctic Glaciers ‘Unstoppable,’ Studies Find

Melt of Key Antarctic Glaciers ‘Unstoppable,’ Studies Find

Sea level rise estimates are going to need to be revised upward: A portion of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet that is home to some of the fastest-flowing glaciers on the continent appears to have entered a state of retreat and melt that is “unstoppable,” two new studies have found. “It has passed the point of no return,” said Eric Rignot, lead… Read More

Dam It: Feds Say U.S. Can Double Hydropower

Dam It: Feds Say U.S. Can Double Hydropower

The DOE study suggests America’s rivers are troves of vast untapped hydropower potential and developing many of them could help combat climate change by helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation using fossil fuels.… Read More

Winter Won’t Let Go: Great Lakes Still on Ice

Winter Won’t Let Go: Great Lakes Still on Ice

April has come and gone but a record amount of ice still remains on the Great Lakes. This April was the lakes’ iciest on record after a near-record winter, and the season has been notable for how early ice formed and how long it’s lingered. At the close of April, nearly a quarter of the five Great Lakes -- the largest group of lakes on Earth -- st… Read More

Storm Surge Could Flood NYC 1 in Every 4 Years

Storm Surge Could Flood NYC 1 in Every 4 Years

When a storm, such as Hurricane Sandy, sets waters in New York Harbor rising, those sloshing seas are now 20 times more likely to overtop the Manhattan seawall than 170 years ago, a new study finds. The increased risk comes from a combination of sea level rise — which has raised water levels near New York City by nearly 1.5 feet since the mid-… Read More