Support Our Work
News Section
Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Climate Change Altering Droughts, Impacts Across U.S.

Climate Change Altering Droughts, Impacts Across U.S.

As a major drought devastated the West and Midwest beginning in 2012, farmers racked up billions of dollars in crop losses and water managers grappled with possible water shortages for millions of people as reservoirs dried up in the heat. That drought is now gone. But scientists have found that the dry spell showed unusual wild extremes of … Read More

Desert Basins Could Hold ‘Missing’ Carbon Sinks

Desert Basins Could Hold ‘Missing’ Carbon Sinks

Deserts across the globe may contain some of the world’s “missing” carbon sinks — land masses scientists had not previously identified that absorb carbon from the atmosphere, according to researchers at China’s Lanzhou University. A study published Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience found that closed, or endorheic, basins in deserts — areas… Read More

Houston Fears Warming Will Cause Catastrophic Flooding

Houston Fears Warming Will Cause Catastrophic Flooding

Sam Brody is not a real estate agent, but when his friends want to move home they get in touch to ask for advice. He is a flood impact expert in Houston — and he has plenty of work to keep him busy. The Texas metropolis has more casualties and property loss from floods than any other locality in the U.S., according to data stretching back to 1960 … Read More

It’s June. California Is Still Covered in Snow

It’s June. California Is Still Covered in Snow

The summer solstice is just around the corner, but someone forgot to tell California’s snowpack. After years of wallowing in drought, this winter walloped California’s Sierra Nevada mountains in a major, record-setting way. And while the calendar says summer, winter still has its grips on the granite spine of the Sierras… Read More

Human Activities Are Taking Their Toll in the Deep Ocean

Human Activities Are Taking Their Toll in the Deep Ocean

Imagine sinking into the deepest parts of the Central Pacific Ocean, somewhere between Mexico and Hawaii. Watch as the water turns from clear to blue to dark blue to black. And then continue on for another 15,000 feet (4,600 meters) to the seafloor — roughly the distance from the peak of California’s Mount Whitney to the bottom of nearby Death … Read More

Protecting Ocean Waters Will Aid Climate Adaptation

Protecting Ocean Waters Will Aid Climate Adaptation

Setting aside vast swathes of ocean and protecting them from industrial uses such as overfishing and other development is critically important to helping both the earth and countries adapt to climate change, a global team of marine biologists says. Large marine reserves can also help prevent some of the worst effects of climate change by helping … Read More

Warmer Temperatures Drying the Rio Grande

Warmer Temperatures Drying the Rio Grande

The intensifying effects of warming temperatures on water shortages have been detected in remote northern New Mexico, where melting snowfall feeds one of the Southwest’s most important rivers. Researchers seeking to improve forecasts for how much water from the Rio Grande will be available for 5 million people each year found that rising … Read More

Europe’s Farming Vulnerable with Water Scarcity

Europe’s Farming Vulnerable with Water Scarcity

Water scarcity half a world away caused by climate change could push up prices for meat and diary products in Europe by disrupting supplies of soybean, which is widely used as feed for livestock, researchers said Wednesday. The European Union sources most soybean from outside the 28-nation bloc — mainly from Argentina, Brazil and the United … Read More

Gallery

Changing Rainfall Patterns in the U.S. Since 1900, the average annual precipitation is up 5 percent for the continental U.S.

View Gallery