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Amazon Trees Removed Almost a Third Less Carbon

Amazon Trees Removed Almost a Third Less Carbon

The amount of carbon the Amazon’s remaining trees removed from the atmosphere fell by almost a third last decade, leading scientists to warn that manmade carbon emissions would need to be cut more deeply to tackle climate change. Trees in untouched areas of the forest have been dying off across the basin at an increasing rate, found the study, publ… Read More

Drought-Stricken West Gives Rise to Old World Cows

Drought-Stricken West Gives Rise to Old World Cows

In the remote reaches of Mexico’s Copper Canyon, miles from the nearest road or settlement, a moving speck on a steep rock wall caught Alfredo Gonzalez’s eye. “I thought, that couldn’t be a cow, maybe a goat,” the longtime ranch manager and animal scientist. “The canyon goes straight up and down. But when we looked with binoculars, there they were:… Read More

Southern California’s Fog Falls Victim to Concrete

Southern California’s Fog Falls Victim to Concrete

Summertime fog that helps keep coastal southern California cool and damp appears to be melting away, and scientists who have documented nearly 70 years of its decline think they can explain why: concrete. The urban heat island effect, the phenomenon of cities warming faster than surrounding countryside, is a main culprit for a two-thirds reduction… Read More

Sao Paulo’s Reservoirs Feel Pinch of Failed Wet Season

Sao Paulo’s Reservoirs Feel Pinch of Failed Wet Season

Sao Paulo, in the wake of another dry summer in southeast Brazil, continues to struggle with a multi-year drought. The city has implemented water rationing, but reservoir levels still hover at perilously low levels and will likely remain there or drop even further as the usual rainy season ends. What is traditionally the rainy season runs from Sept… Read More

Artificial Glaciers in India Help Drought-Hit Villages

Artificial Glaciers in India Help Drought-Hit Villages

Villagers of the high desert of Ladakh in India’s Jammu and Kashmir state used to harvest bountiful crops of barley, wheat, fruits, and vegetables in summer. But for years the streams have run dry in spring, just when farmers needed water to sow seeds. They had water when it wasn’t needed during the rest of the year, such as in winter, when Ladakhi… Read More

Europe Warned Pollution Will Lead To Premature Deaths

Europe Warned Pollution Will Lead To Premature Deaths

Hundreds of thousands of Europeans will suffer a premature death in the next two decades as the result of governments’ failure to act on air pollution, Europe’s environmental watchdog has warned. In 2011, the latest year for which figures have been reliably collated, more than 400,000 are estimated to have died prematurely as a result of breathing … Read More

Largest Offshore Wind Farm Approved for UK Coast

Largest Offshore Wind Farm Approved for UK Coast

Plans for the world’s biggest offshore wind farm have been given the green light by the energy secretary, with planning permission for an array of up to 400 turbines 80 miles off the Yorkshire coast on the Dogger Bank. The project, more than twice the size of the UK’s current biggest offshore wind farm, is expected to cost $9.2 billion to $12.3 bil… Read More

Last Tango for Nuclear?

Last Tango for Nuclear?

Everybody loves a comeback story. If you like the U.S. nuclear power industry, it’s a Michael Jordan-type gallant return. If you don’t like nukes, it’s more of a Gloria Swanson gruesome comeback in Sunset Boulevard. Similar to both Jordan and Swanson’s character, Norma Desmond, the industry has tried more than one revival. The current one may be m… Read More

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Record Highs vs. Record Lows Record highs have outpaced record lows by a bigger margin each decade since the 1960s.

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