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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Worsening Water Scarcity to Affect 2 Billion Globally

Worsening Water Scarcity to Affect 2 Billion Globally

Water scarcity is a fact of life in many parts of the world, particularly in the countries of sub-Saharan Africa. A new study says the situation could get a lot worse, with climate change resulting in less rain and more evaporation in many areas. The study, led by researchers at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact and Research and appearing i… Read More

Epic Flooding Deals Colorado Drought Crippling Blow

Epic Flooding Deals Colorado Drought Crippling Blow

All it took was a 1,000-year flood to knock out — or at least significantly dampen — the drought that has been ravaging much of Colorado for at least a year and half. The Sept. 17 U.S. Drought Monitor, released Thursday, shows that nearly all of north-central Colorado is drought free, and the drought is greatly reduced in much of the rest of the … Read More

Microgrids: Sandy Forced Cities to Rethink Power Supply

Microgrids: Sandy Forced Cities to Rethink Power Supply

Hurricane Sandy and the havoc it wreaked on New York City and the rest of the Northeast in 2012 could prove to be a turning point in how people think about the way electricity is produced and distributed in storm-prone areas.… Read More

Newfangled ‘Icepod’ Tracks Greenland’s Melting Ice Sheets

Newfangled ‘Icepod’ Tracks Greenland’s Melting Ice Sheets

The LC-130 Hercules flew low over the ice sheet in a tight grid pattern, Teflon-coated landing skis barely 300 meters above the soft upper layer of snow. At the rear of the plane, scientists clustered round a monitor displaying a regular pattern of dark red waves generated by a radar signal. Somewhere in the vast, white emptiness below were two tin… Read More

The U.N., Storms, and Air Travel: Climate Takes the Stage

The U.N., Storms, and Air Travel: Climate Takes the Stage

Climate change takes center stage this week when it comes to storms, air travel and the U.N.… Read More

Rising Levels of Acids in Seas May Endanger Marine Life

Rising Levels of Acids in Seas May Endanger Marine Life

Rapidly rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are causing a potential catastrophe in our oceans as they become more acidic, scientists have warned. Hans Poertner, professor of marine biology at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany, and co-author of a new study of the phenomenon, told the Guardian: "The current rate of change is likely… Read More

Fukushima’s Radioactive Legacy is Just Beginning

Fukushima’s Radioactive Legacy is Just Beginning

The discovery at the plant of a leak of radioactive caesium eight times more dangerous than the levels immediately after the Fukushima accident in March 2011 has aroused international concern that Japan is incapable of containing the aftermath of the accident. A Chinese statement expressed shock at the news and urged Japan to be more open about… Read More

Saving Reefs by Enlisting Citizens as New Scientists

Saving Reefs by Enlisting Citizens as New Scientists

Ever wanted to see a coral reef up close? What until now has been a privilege reserved to a small minority is about to become something millions of us can (virtually) do. Scientists have hit on a way to harness 360-degree panoramas from Google’s underwater street-view format in order to let anyone with access to a computer see reefs in real time … Read More