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Zombie Glacier Surprises Scientists

Zombie Glacier Surprises Scientists

Glaciologists tend to speak of glaciers as if they were living creatures. They say they grow and die and have good health and bad. Now, with Halloween approaching, a handful of scientists has found a way that the anthropomorphized rivers of ice that they study can simultaneously live and die as the globe warms. The discovery of a ghoulishly semi-l… Read More

Expanding Antarctic Sea Ice is Flooding ‘Warning Bell’

Expanding Antarctic Sea Ice is Flooding ‘Warning Bell’

The spreading sheet of sea ice around Antarctica could be viewed as a napkin being draped over a monstrous water pistol. If, that is, the gelid napkin was a self-assembling machine that could reach beneath itself, aim the squirt gun at the planet’s shorelines, and squeeze the trigger. Research suggests that the expansion of Antarctic sea ice herald… Read More

Fish Fail to Adapt to Rising CO2 Levels: Study

Fish Fail to Adapt to Rising CO2 Levels: Study

Rising carbon dioxide levels in oceans adversely change the behavior of fish through generations, raising the possibility that marine species may never fully adapt to their changed environment, research has found. The study, published in Nature Climate Change, found that elevated CO2 levels affected fish regardless of whether their parents had also… Read More

Sea Level Rise Making Floods Routine for Coastal Cities

Sea Level Rise Making Floods Routine for Coastal Cities

Coastal American cities are sinking into saturated new realities, new analysis has confirmed. Sea level rise has given a boost to high tides, which are regularly overtopping streets, floorboards and other low-lying areas that had long existed in relatively dehydrated harmony with nearby waterfronts — a trend projected to worsen sharply in the comin… Read More

How We Can Save Coral Reefs and Why We Should

How We Can Save Coral Reefs and Why We Should

Coral reefs are among the most beautiful ecosystems on Earth — “a jeweled belt around the middle of the planet,” in oceanographer Sylvia Earle’s words. They also are extremely valuable. Reefs cover less than one-tenth of 1 percent of the ocean floor but support more than 800 species of coral and 4,000 species of fish. They are spawning grounds, coa… Read More

Climate Change Could Increase Global Fresh Water: MIT

Climate Change Could Increase Global Fresh Water: MIT

Global warming may increase the overall amount of freshwater flowing in rivers worldwide by about 15 percent, easing water scarcity in many places, including the U.S. Midwest, according to MIT’s Energy and Climate Outlook 2014, released Monday. … Read More

Drought Drains Already Diminished Aral Sea

Drought Drains Already Diminished Aral Sea

The Aral Sea has been dying a long, slow death. This summer, another nail was driven into its coffin. Starting in the 1950s, when Soviet authorities began programs that diverted water from its tributaries, the inland lake in Central Asia — once the fourth largest in the world, bigger than Lake Huron — has been shrinking. This summer, the eastern l… Read More

Drought Takes Hold as Amazon’s ‘Flying Rivers’ Dry Up

Drought Takes Hold as Amazon’s ‘Flying Rivers’ Dry Up

The unprecedented drought now affecting São Paulo, South America’s giant metropolis, is believed to be caused by the absence of the “flying rivers” − the vapor clouds from the Amazon that normally bring rain to the center and south of Brazil. Some Brazilian scientists say the absence of rain that has dried up rivers and reservoirs in central and so… Read More