News Section
Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Obama Issues Tropical Storm Forecast, Does Twitter Q&A

Obama Issues Tropical Storm Forecast, Does Twitter Q&A

Add another title to Barack Obama's resume: hurricane forecaster. On Thursday, President Obama spent the morning touring the National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami and getting a briefing on the coming Atlantic hurricane season, which begins on June 1. However, the eastern Pacific region saw its hurricane season start two weeks ago on May 15 and … Read More

Across U.S., Heaviest Downpours On The Rise

Across U.S., Heaviest Downpours On The Rise

Record-breaking rain across Texas and Oklahoma this week caused widespread flooding, the likes of which the region has rarely, if ever, seen. For seven locations there, May 2015 has seen the most rain of any month ever recorded, with five days to go and the rain still coming. While rainfall in the region is consistent with the emerging El Niño, the… Read More

America’s Future Has Wind in its Sails

America’s Future Has Wind in its Sails

As reducing greenhouse gas emissions to slow a changing climate becomes more urgent, though, wind is expected to become one of the country’s largest sources of energy by mid-century. The U.S. Department of Energy has published two new maps that put that future in more concrete terms. The first is part of a report released this spring showing how … Read More

Take a Look at One of the First Climate Models In Action

Take a Look at One of the First Climate Models In Action

Climate models, they just don’t make ‘em like they used to. Of course, that may not be a bad thing. Like an Atari to an Xbox One, a Nokia brick to an iPhone 6, climate models have come a long way since their early predecessors. In a video recently published by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, you can see just much of an update computer-run models … Read More

With Climate Change, Ticks Marching Farther and Earlier

With Climate Change, Ticks Marching Farther and Earlier

You might not be aware of it, but May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month, devoted to reminding people who spend time in wooded areas to cover up. Otherwise, a bite from a black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis, a.k.a. a deer tick) could lead to joint and muscle pain — and in some cases, to chronic arthritis, mental confusion and even heart problems.… Read More

‘Steel on the Water’ Critical for Offshore Wind in U.S.

‘Steel on the Water’ Critical for Offshore Wind in U.S.

Offshore wind power, a source of renewable energy that Europeans have been investing in for decades, has not yet materialized in the U.S. as debates have swirled about the viability of wind farms off the country’s coastlines. That, however, may be about to change. The Block Island Wind Farm is set to break ground in July off the coast of … Read More

Intense Wildfire Season Expected in West

Intense Wildfire Season Expected in West

Amid one the West’s worst droughts in centuries, more than 5,600 wildfires scorched more than 600,000 acres last year in California alone. It could happen again. With drought showing signs of worsening across the West and Upper Midwest, the Forest Service anticipates that it may spend up to $1.6 billion fighting wildfires in 2015, in a fire … Read More

U.S. Hurricane Drought ‘A Matter of Luck’

U.S. Hurricane Drought ‘A Matter of Luck’

From water to your dating life, most droughts are tough. But in the case of major hurricanes, a dry spell can be a good thing. And the U.S. has been in one for nine years. Every day that passes without a major hurricane hitting the U.S. stretches the current record-setting hurricane drought just a bit further. The last major hurricane … Read More

Gallery

More CO2 = More Pollen If CO2 emissions continue at the current pace, pollen counts are projected to nearly double by 2060.

View Gallery