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All of 2015’s Rain for the U.S. in 14 Seconds

All of 2015’s Rain for the U.S. in 14 Seconds

It’s no secret that it has been really wet in the Southeast and really dry out West over the first half of the year. But to really understand the split and how we got here, NASA has a helpful, color recap of the year in rain. The imagery comes courtesy of the agency’s Global Precipitation Measurement constellation of satellites. In February last … Read More

What Changes to Expect from Obama’s Clean Power Plan

What Changes to Expect from Obama’s Clean Power Plan

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will unveil as soon as Monday the final version of a sweeping - and controversial - regulation to cut carbon emissions from the electricity sector. In its initial version, the Clean Power Plan called for cutting the country's power plant emissions 30 percent from 2005 levels by 2030, setting different… Read More

Study: Warming May Bring Heightened Salmonella Risk

Study: Warming May Bring Heightened Salmonella Risk

Living along the shoreline may be nice, but a new study suggests that as climate change makes extreme weather and temperature events more frequent, cases of salmonella poisoning may become more prevalent, too, especially in some coastal communities. Each year, it is estimated that 1 million people in the United States become sickened from … Read More

What Warming Means for 4 of Summer’s Worst Pests

What Warming Means for 4 of Summer’s Worst Pests

Summer may mean it’s time for outdoor fun in the sun, but it’s also prime time for a number of pests. All that extra time outdoors can bring everything from poison ivy rashes to exposure to Lyme disease from tick bites. And of course there’s that ubiquitous summer menace, the mosquito. With the rising temperatures brought about by global warming… Read More

GAO Report Sees Climate Risks to Army Corps Projects

GAO Report Sees Climate Risks to Army Corps Projects

Thousands of dams, levees, hurricane barriers and flood walls built across the country by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers may be at risk from extreme weather and sea level rise driven by climate change, but the Army Corps has only just begun to assess how vulnerable they are and suffers from a lack of funding, according to a U.S. Government … Read More

Stagnant Summer Days on the Rise in U.S.

Stagnant Summer Days on the Rise in U.S.

Those long, hot, sultry days of summer, the ones where the air seem so still it wouldn’t disturb a leaf, are also days where air quality can take a nosedive. With winds barely above a whisper and atmosphere-scouring rains nowhere in sight, pollutants can build up in the air we breathe, with potentially serious health consequences. Since climate… Read More

Summer Nights Are Heating Up Across U.S.

Summer Nights Are Heating Up Across U.S.

Global warming often conjures scenes of sweaty, scorching summer days, but daytime temperatures aren’t the only thing expected to rise in a warming world. Nights, too, are expected to get sultrier, with overnight lows not dropping as much as they used to. That trend in increasing nighttime low temperatures is expected to continue for the entire … Read More

States Cut Power Plant Emissions Ahead of New EPA Rule

States Cut Power Plant Emissions Ahead of New EPA Rule

Forty-two states are reducing carbon dioxide emissions from power plants on their own as they move toward using less coal and more natural gas to produce electricity. Between 2008 and 2013, those states reduced greenhouse gas emissions from electric power plants by an average of 19 percent, according to a report published Tuesday.… Read More

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Fuel Used to Make Electricity in US: 2008 Coal was the dominant fuel used to to generate electricity in the US in 2008.

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