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Western Drought Intensifies, Leads to Deadly Wildfires

Western Drought Intensifies, Leads to Deadly Wildfires

A western heat wave allowed drought to intensify and expand in Idaho, Oregon and Montana last week. 72.25 percent of the land area in the ten western states is now under drought conditions, according to the latest update to the U.S. Drought Monitor. The worst impacts of the drought are concentrated in the Southwest: New Mexico, Texas, Southern… Read More

$110 Billion Price Tag for Extreme Weather Events in 2012

$110 Billion Price Tag for Extreme Weather Events in 2012

Now the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has totaled the losses caused by the 11 most expensive extreme weather and climate disasters in 2012, each of which cost upwards of $1 billion. According to NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C., these billion-dollar events cost the U.S. a total of $110 billion, which … Read More

Spring in U.S. Was Cooler and More Extreme Than Average

Spring in U.S. Was Cooler and More Extreme Than Average

The season was especially notable for its exceptionally cold and wet start in the central part of the country, with many cities, from Bismark, N.D., to St. Louis and even Richmond, Va., receiving more snow during the meteorological spring months than they did during winter. Fourteen states, from Minnesota to Georgia had a spring that ranked among t… Read More

New York Launches $19.5 Billion Climate Resiliency Plan

New York Launches $19.5 Billion Climate Resiliency Plan

Underlying the portfolio of measures, which amount to the largest climate resilience program of any city worldwide, Bloomberg said, are a recognition that climate change is increasing the risks of damaging storm surge events in New York by increasing sea levels, and that climate change is also likely to worsen heat waves, heavy precipitation events… Read More

NOAA Satellite Back Online After ‘Micrometeoroid’ Strike

NOAA Satellite Back Online After ‘Micrometeoroid’ Strike

According to a NOAA press release, engineers were finally able to pinpoint why the satellite, known as GOES-13, had a sudden disruption in its orientation toward Earth on May 22. NOAA said Monday that a micrometeoroid, possibly from debris left over from other space missions, or “space junk,” likely hit the arm for the satellite’s solar array panel… Read More

Methane Leaks May Negate Climate Benefits of Natural Gas

Methane Leaks May Negate Climate Benefits of Natural Gas

Methane leaks could undo the climate change benefits of America's natural gas boom, a new report said on Tuesday. The report, produced by the Centre for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES), said America's shift from coal to gas had produced important climate gains. Carbon dioxide emissions fell last year to their lowest point since 1994, accordin… Read More

NOAA To Revive Essential Weather Satellite on Thursday

NOAA To Revive Essential Weather Satellite on Thursday

NOAA will revive a vital weather satellite that covers the Atlantic Ocean and East Coast after it went offline on May 22.… Read More

As Hurricane Season Starts, U.S. Facing Heightened Risk

As Hurricane Season Starts, U.S. Facing Heightened Risk

The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season starts Saturday, and scientists are warning that it is likely to be a doozy, with more storms than average and more major hurricanes (Category 3 intensity or stronger). Not only are forecasters calling for an unusually active season, they also say that there are signs that the U.S., which hasn’t had a major hurric… Read More