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Supreme Court Blocks EPA Rule on Mercury Emissions

Supreme Court Blocks EPA Rule on Mercury Emissions

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency overstepped its authority with a 2012 regulation limiting mercury emissions and other pollutants from coal-fired power plants because it refused to consider the costs involved in complying with the mandate. In a 5-4 opinion, the court said that the EPA must consider the … Read More

U.S. Weather in 16 Prize-Winning Images

U.S. Weather in 16 Prize-Winning Images

The winners have been announced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s “Weather in Focus” photo contest, which sought to acknowledge the best snapshots of weather or the science used to forecast the weather, climate and water.… Read More

U.S. Summers Bringing More and More Heat

U.S. Summers Bringing More and More Heat

It’s officially summer! We have now passed the points that mark the traditional start to summer (Memorial Day), the meteorological start (June 1), and now the astronomical start, or summer solstice (June 21) — so break out those flip-flops and beach towels! Though June, July, and August usually bring the heat, for parts of the country spring felt … Read More

New Rules Would Cut Emissions From Buses, Big Rigs

New Rules Would Cut Emissions From Buses, Big Rigs

Big rigs and other medium- and heavy-duty trucks plying U.S. highways may become much more fuel efficient if new rules proposed on Friday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are finalized. The rules, submitted as part of the Obama administration’s Climate Action Plan, seek to increase the fuel efficiency of medium and heavy-duty trucks … Read More

National Parks Visits Could Rise and Fall as Temps Warm

National Parks Visits Could Rise and Fall as Temps Warm

As the balmier temperatures of spring and summer arrive, the crowds begin to swell at the vast system of national parks and other landmarks spread across the U.S., to the tune of more than 270 million visits a year. The number of people going to witness the eruption of Old Faithful or gawk at the grandeur of the Grand Canyon could go up along with … Read More

Big Batteries, Energy Storage Key to Renewables’ Future

Big Batteries, Energy Storage Key to Renewables’ Future

Hawaii has the most expensive utility rates in the nation because most of its electricity is generated using imported crude oil. But as a new law moves the state toward renewable energy sources that could lessen its dependence on fossil fuels, Hawaii may join several other states in rolling out a secret weapon — big batteries. … Read More

New Research Projects Could Revitalize Nuclear Power

New Research Projects Could Revitalize Nuclear Power

Nuclear power, a low-carbon but expensive source of electricity, isn’t likely to grow much in the United States, even as President Obama pushes to slash greenhouse gas emissions from electric power plants. But the U.S. Department of Energy is betting that $60 million in new research and development could eventually breathe some new life into … Read More

Obama Issues Tropical Storm Forecast, Does Twitter Q&A

Obama Issues Tropical Storm Forecast, Does Twitter Q&A

Add another title to Barack Obama's resume: hurricane forecaster. On Thursday, President Obama spent the morning touring the National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami and getting a briefing on the coming Atlantic hurricane season, which begins on June 1. However, the eastern Pacific region saw its hurricane season start two weeks ago on May 15 and … Read More

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The Russian Heat Wave of 2010: July Temperatures Probability function of July average temperature anomalies in Moscow, Russia.

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