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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Here’s Where Ocean Acidification Will Hit the U.S. Hardest

Here’s Where Ocean Acidification Will Hit the U.S. Hardest

U.S. coastal communities better start preparing for ocean acidification now, especially if we want scallops, oysters and other shellfish to keep appearing on our dinnerplates. That’s the message of a new study that shows that shellfisheries across the U.S. are more vulnerable to climate change’s less considered counterpart than previously thought … Read More

Racking Up Climate Milestones One President at a Time

Racking Up Climate Milestones One President at a Time

A happy Presidents Day to you. There have been 44 presidents spanning nearly 240 years of U.S. history. During that span, major climate events have sometimes steered the course of history — think 1816, the "Year Without Summer" in the wake of Mount Tambora's eruption — and major science discoveries informed the world our fair climate — Arrhenius'… Read More

Whiteout? Map Shows Last Time All 50 States Had Snow

Whiteout? Map Shows Last Time All 50 States Had Snow

Boston probably has enough snow for the rest of the country. But the last time all 50 states shared in Massachusetts' snowy fortune (or misfortune depending on how you feel about it) was five years ago this week.… Read More

Climate, Satellite Gaps are Risky Business for Feds

Climate, Satellite Gaps are Risky Business for Feds

In 2014, the federal government set aside $3.5 trillion in outlays for myriad programs. That’s a huge chunk of change exposed to a lot of risks, and according to a new report, two of the biggest threats are the impacts climate change and a looming weather satellite gap. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) released its biennial High Risk rep… Read More

Winter Is Losing Its Cool

Winter Is Losing Its Cool

Hearing about climate change may bring heat waves and sweltering summers to mind, but in most regions in the U.S., winter temperatures are also on the rise. In spite of last year’s East Coast blizzard and polar vortex, winters have, on average, been getting warmer since the 1970s. One of the starkest examples of this is the overall drop in nights … Read More

A Country Divided by Seasons and Warming

A Country Divided by Seasons and Warming

The U.S. is no stranger to differences among its sometimes bickering states, so perhaps it’s no surprise that even global warming finds itself with some regional rivalries. A Climate Central analysis of regional and seasonal temperature differences in the contiguous U.S. since 1970 reveals a country divided along temperature lines, just as it is i… Read More

Feds Opening Waters to Largest U.S. Offshore Wind Farm

Feds Opening Waters to Largest U.S. Offshore Wind Farm

The Atlantic’s powerful bluster twirls thousands of wind turbines off the coast of Europe, sending gigawatts of renewable energy coursing into the power grid there. Currently, there is not a single wind turbine generating even a watt of electricity in American waters as oil platforms represent the only offshore energy development in the U.S. But th… Read More

Cold Nights Are Decreasing Across the U.S.

Cold Nights Are Decreasing Across the U.S.

It’s easy to think of global warming as something that happens at a steady pace everywhere in the world. But that’s not the full story. It’s true that the global average temperature has been rising overall since modern record-keeping began, and it’s true that 2014 was the hottest year on record, but the rise hasn’t been perfectly steady. Each year … Read More