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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

6 Degrees: Kimye, TV, March Rankings and More

6 Degrees: Kimye, TV, March Rankings and More

How does Kimye and watching TV relate to climate change? Find out here in our top picks of the week. … Read More

Weather-Related Blackouts Doubled Since 2003: Report

Weather-Related Blackouts Doubled Since 2003: Report

Climate change is causing an increase in many types of extreme weather. Heat waves are hotter, heavy rain events are heavier, and winter storms have increased in both frequency and intensity. To date, these kinds of severe weather are among the leading causes of large-scale power outages in the United States. Climate change will increase the risk o… Read More

Tornado Technology Innovation Born From 1974 Tragedy

Tornado Technology Innovation Born From 1974 Tragedy

Thursday marked the 40th anniversary of one of the most destructive tornado outbreaks in U.S. history. The event, deemed a Super Outbreak, took place over two days and spawned nearly 150 tornadoes across 13 states and the Canadian province of Ontario. The storm left behind millions of dollars in damage and caused 300 deaths and 6,000 injuries. The … Read More

U.S. Lags Behind China in Renewables Investments

U.S. Lags Behind China in Renewables Investments

For the second year, an annual Pew Charitable Trusts report, “Who’s Winning the Clean Energy Race?”, shows that China is the world leader in clean energy investment, with $54 billion in investments in renewables in 2013, well above total U.S. 2013 investment of $36.7 billion.… Read More

Spring is Arriving Earlier and Earlier in the U.S.

Spring is Arriving Earlier and Earlier in the U.S.

March 20th marks the first day of the vernal equinox, although spring might feel like it's never going to arrive for those still battling unseasonably cold weather from the Midwest to the East. But don’t be fooled by this year's cooler temperatures. When you define the onset of spring as the “first leaf” date for a number of plants, the season is a… Read More

White House Brings Together Big Data & Climate Change

White House Brings Together Big Data & Climate Change

Addressing climate change just got an assist from big data. The White House released the first installment of data and tools for web developers, planners and the public to see the challenges climate change poses and to help identify solutions. The new site, climate.data.gov, is part of a broader Climate Data Initiative to make climate data easily … Read More

East Greets Winter’s End; West Braces for Drought, Fire

East Greets Winter’s End; West Braces for Drought, Fire

February marked the end of winter in the meteorological sense, and it continued a three-month trend of warm and dry conditions in the West and cool and wet conditions in the East. And despite a seemingly endless winter for those on the East Coast, for most of the states from Georgia to Maine, it was just an average winter. Not a single state on t… Read More

Why You Shouldn’t Hope for An Early Spring

Why You Shouldn’t Hope for An Early Spring

The spring of 2012 was the earliest recorded across the United States since 1900. In many states, signs of spring arrived almost three to four weeks earlier than expected. Unseasonable warmth prompted unusually early blooms, particularly on fruiting trees in the Northeast and Great Lakes regions. Observers in Massachusetts and Wisconsin reported … Read More