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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Time Is Running Out to Avert a Third Summer of Drought

Time Is Running Out to Avert a Third Summer of Drought

Meanwhile, the economic toll of the worst drought to strike the U.S. since at least the 1950s is climbing, and it “will probably end up being a top-five disaster event” among the government’s ranking of all weather disasters over the past three decades, said Brad Rippey, a meteorologist in the Agriculture Department’s Office of the Chief Economist,… Read More

Warming Climate Yields Another Hot January: NOAA

Warming Climate Yields Another Hot January: NOAA

The Northern Hemisphere saw above-average snow cover extent for January, with the sixth largest in the 47-year record, or 730,000 square miles above the 1967-2013 average. The western U.S., eastern China, and much of Europe had above-average January snow cover. While winter Northern Hemisphere snow cover has grown at a rate of about 0.1 percent per… Read More

Spring Chill Sends Monarchs Fluttering North

Spring Chill Sends Monarchs Fluttering North

For scientists, the annual migration of Monarch butterflies from Canada to Mexico and back again has been as mysterious as it is beautiful. Each autumn, the brilliant orange-and-black insects converge on fir and pine forests in Mexico’s Sierra Madre mountains, where they spend the winter in a kind of hibernation until spring comes. Researchers… Read More

Warming Winters: U.S. Temperature Trends

Warming Winters: U.S. Temperature Trends

While the U.S. has seen a warming trend that has raised temperatures by 1.3°F over the past 100 years, warming varies seasonally, and it’s winter that has seen the fastest warming. An analysis of data from the U.S. Historical Climatology Network of weather stations shows that the coldest states are warming the fastest, and across the country winter… Read More

Snowstorm Headed For Heart of Drought Region

Snowstorm Headed For Heart of Drought Region

According to the most recent U.S. Drought Monitor, 77 percent of Nebraska is currently classified as experiencing “exceptional” drought conditions, the most severe category there is. In Kansas, that figure is lower, at 36 percent of the state.… Read More

Nuclear Power Cannot Compete with Cheap Shale Gas

Nuclear Power Cannot Compete with Cheap Shale Gas

Nuclear power stations in Canada and the United States are closing because they cannot compete with cheap power being produced from shale gas. This revolution in the way North America produces its electricity is sending shock waves through the nuclear industry in Europe too. New nuclear build will be spectacularly uneconomic if a fracking industry… Read More

The Top 10 Hardest-Hit States for Crop Damage

The Top 10 Hardest-Hit States for Crop Damage

The searing U.S. drought of 2012 devastated the nation’s corn crop, pushing yields down in some states to their lowest levels in nearly 30 years. According to recently-released numbers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Missouri, Illinois and Indiana were among the hardest hit Corn Belt states, with yields at 28-, 26-, and 22-year … Read More

Community Rallies Against Proposed Trash Incinerator

Community Rallies Against Proposed Trash Incinerator

The farm town of Gonzales, in the center of the Salinas Valley, has been known throughout its 140-year history as "Little Switzerland," the "heart of the salad bowl," and, today, the "wine capital" of Monterey County. Now a proposal from a Canadian energy company could change Gonzales' moniker yet again: It hopes to build a commercial-scale plant… Read More