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Scientists Pore Over Warm West, Cold East Divide

Scientists Pore Over Warm West, Cold East Divide

From blooming flowers to twittering birds, the signs of spring are popping up, and the miseries of winter becoming a distant memory for many. But not for some climate scientists. The curiosity of a growing group of researchers has been piqued by the tenacious temperature divide that has separated East from West over the past two winters, as a… Read More

Clean Energy Seeing Global ‘Renaissance’

Clean Energy Seeing Global ‘Renaissance’

An energy renaissance is one of the central messages of the Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) Future of Energy Summit taking place this week in New York City. Bloomberg analysts, government regulators and industry officials in attendance are debating how far renewable electricity has come as prices have fallen… Read More

Three Ways The West Can Adapt To Drought

Three Ways The West Can Adapt To Drought

The current Washington drought could help the West learn to adapt to one of the most profound effects that climate change is projected to bring to the region. Scientists warn that climate change could deliver “megadroughts” to the West, the likes of which haven’t been experienced in more than a millenium. “I’m seeing this year as a dress rehearsal … Read More

Pacific Winds Tied to Warming Slowdown, Dry West

Pacific Winds Tied to Warming Slowdown, Dry West

To understand why the West has been so dry since the turn of the century, cast your eye further west — to the natural waxing and waning of Pacific Ocean winds. Strong trade winds have been forcing heat into ocean depths, contributing to a temporary slowdown in land surface warming over the past 15 to 20 years that some have called a warming hiatus… Read More

When Climate Science Clashes With Real-World Policy

When Climate Science Clashes With Real-World Policy

When a San Francisco panel began mulling rules about building public projects near changing shorelines, its self-described science translator, David Behar, figured he would just turn to the U.N.’s most recent climate assessment for guidance on future sea levels. He couldn’t.… Read More

Calif. Continues to Shatter Temperature Records

Calif. Continues to Shatter Temperature Records

The dubious records keep piling up for California, a state wracked by four years of drought brought on by a pernicious weather pattern that has kept rains a bay and exacerbated by human-induced warming. Just one week after the state measured its lowest-ever snowpack, U.S. scientists have announced that the year so far has been the warmest on record… Read More

Power Plant Rules Could Unite States On Climate Action

Power Plant Rules Could Unite States On Climate Action

Proposed greenhouse gas rules affecting America’s electricity industry are inflaming entrenched schisms between some governors and the president — but they could eventually lead to an unprecedented level of unity among states on climate action. If it survives court challenges, the EPA’s Clean Power Plan will force state administrations to impose r… Read More

How Flood Insurance Could Drive Americans From Coasts

How Flood Insurance Could Drive Americans From Coasts

As salty waters ride the fossil fueled escalator of sea level rise into American streets and homes, rising flood risks may force coastal neighborhoods — if not entire cities — to be abandoned in the decades ahead. “You can’t build a seawall along the entire Eastern Seaboard,” Jessica Grannis, a climate adaptation specialist at Georgetown Climate Ce… Read More

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Alaska’s Ice Drain 2004-07 Alaska has been shedding large amounts of ice into the sea - on average, enough to fill a daily freight train around the world.

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