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More Rain, Less Snow for U.S. Winters

More Rain, Less Snow for U.S. Winters

For most states in the U.S., winters without snow would be like a Super Bowl performance without Beyonce, Donald Trump without a combover or an overseas flight without a visa. And yet that’s exactly what’s been happening. As the world warms, it’s changing the essence of winter. It’s not that less precipitation is falling (though that is happening … Read More

Low Oil Prices Force Slowdown of U.S. Tar Sands Project

Low Oil Prices Force Slowdown of U.S. Tar Sands Project

A Canadian company’s efforts to produce oil sands in the United States are not dead, but thanks to crude oil prices that have dipped below $30 per barrel, they may be in critical condition. U.S. Oil Sands, the Alberta-based company working on a project slated to produce crude oil from oil sands on public lands in Utah, is slowing its PR Spring oil… Read More

Obama Confident in Climate Plan Despite Court Setback

Obama Confident in Climate Plan Despite Court Setback

The Obama administration is expressing confidence in its most sweeping climate change policy, despite the Supreme Court’s decision on Tuesday to block its enforcement while a major legal challenge works its way through the courts. The Clean Power Plan, which aims to cut power plant emissions by 32 percent by 2030 compared to 2005 levels … Read More

West Likely to Be Stormier With Climate Change

West Likely to Be Stormier With Climate Change

The types of storms that have been bringing heavy snow and rain to the West this winter, triggering landslides and floods while easing stubborn droughts, are likely to become stronger and more frequent, according to the results of a conclusive new study. The drenching storms have been falling from atmospheric rivers, which are high-altitude streams… Read More

Climate Change Is Leaving Native Plants Behind

Climate Change Is Leaving Native Plants Behind

Willis Linn Jepson encountered a squat shrub while he was collecting botanical specimens on California’s Mount Tamalpais in the fall of 1936. He trimmed off a few branches and jotted down the location along the ridge trail where the manzanita grew, 2,255 feet above sea level. The desiccated specimen is now part of an herbarium here that’s named … Read More

Climate Economists React to Obama’s Proposed Oil Tax

Climate Economists React to Obama’s Proposed Oil Tax

On Thursday, President Obama dropped a surprise in his transportation plan as part of his annual budget. The plan — dubbed the 21st Century Clean Transportation System — calls for $300 billion in investments over the next decade in high speed rail, driverless cars and mass transit across the U.S. That would cut down on carbon pollution and could … Read More

Hot, Dry Weather Could Cut Into California’s Snowpack

Hot, Dry Weather Could Cut Into California’s Snowpack

Hello, it’s me. Words made famous by Adele could just as easily apply to what’s about to happen in California. An unwelcome call is coming from across the Pacific for a state still struggling with drought. A ridge of high pressure is coming to the state, harkening back to the ridiculously resilient ridge of the past few years and butting into… Read More

The Southwest May Have Entered a ‘Drier Climate State’

The Southwest May Have Entered a ‘Drier Climate State’

The Southwest is already the most arid part of the U.S. Now new research indicates it’s becoming even more dry as wet weather patterns, quite literally, dry up. The change could herald a pattern shift and raises the specter of megadrought in the region. “We see a very intense trend in the Southwest,” Andreas Prein, a postdoctoral researcher at the … Read More

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November Heating Up The unusual warmth that started this fall is extending into November.

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