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Crowdsourced Photos Provide Drought Snapshots

Crowdsourced Photos Provide Drought Snapshots

On May 24, a roiling dust cloud enveloped a desolate stretch of road in Prowers County, a rural county in southeast Colorado. The county and surrounding area had been deeply mired in drought for more than 2 years and the photo bore proof of just what drought looked like to its residents. The short note accompanying the photo added more context: “Ph… Read More

Visualize It: Old Weather Data Feeds New Climate Models

Visualize It: Old Weather Data Feeds New Climate Models

In the 1930s, there were no computers to run climate models or record weather observations. Instead, weather reports were written or typed on typewriters and forecast maps were drawn by hand. Those observations from the past contain valuable data that can help scientists better understand what the climate may look like in the future. But gathering… Read More

6 Degrees: Urban Heat, Miami’s Woes & Record Temps

6 Degrees: Urban Heat, Miami’s Woes & Record Temps

The week that was features the latest on urban heats islands, Miami's sea level woes and more. … Read More

A Tale of Two Cities: Miami, New York and Life on the Edge

A Tale of Two Cities: Miami, New York and Life on the Edge

Walking along the waterfront in Fort Lauderdale and admiring the 60-foot yachts docked alongside impressive homes, it’s hard to imagine that this city could suffer the same financial fate as Detroit. But it is almost as hard to imagine how they will avoid a similar crisis given the sea level rise predicted by scientists. The Miami-Fort Lauderdale … Read More

Epic Drought in West is Literally Moving Mountains

Epic Drought in West is Literally Moving Mountains

Some parts of California’s mountains have been uplifted up to 15 mm in the last 18 months because the massive amount of water lost in the drought is no longer weighing down the land, causing it to rise a bit like an uncoiled spring, a new study shows.… Read More

Hot and Getting Hotter: Heat Islands Cooking U.S. Cities

Hot and Getting Hotter: Heat Islands Cooking U.S. Cities

Cites are almost always hotter than the surrounding rural area but global warming takes that heat and makes it worse. In the future, this combination of urbanization and climate change could raise urban temperatures to levels that threaten human health, strain energy resources, and compromise economic productivity. Summers in the U.S. have been … Read More

July Checks In as 4th Warmest on Record Worldwide

July Checks In as 4th Warmest on Record Worldwide

New National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) data show that last month was the fourth-warmest July on record worldwide, even though two giant cool spots in the Northern Hemisphere — one over Siberia and the other over the U.S. Midwest — made it easy for people living there to think that summer 2014 has been a mild one.… Read More

How Climate Friendly is Bike Sharing? It’s Complicated

How Climate Friendly is Bike Sharing? It’s Complicated

There's a lot scientists don't know about how bike sharing programs encourage less driving, and less CO2 from being emitted from car tailpipes. But there's a big benefit to bike sharing: It's a "gateway drug" to all kinds of cycling, and that's a big climate benefit.… Read More