News Section
  • News
  • United States
Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Better Health a Key Benefit of Renewables, Study Says

Better Health a Key Benefit of Renewables, Study Says

Building wind and solar farms helps to reduce the human impact on climate change by displacing noxious emissions from coal-fired power plants. A new study says there’s another important benefit to renewables development: cost savings from cleaner air that saves lives. Researchers from Harvard University, in a bid to show the monetary value of … Read More

‘Grey Swan’ Hurricanes Pose Future Storm Surge Threat

‘Grey Swan’ Hurricanes Pose Future Storm Surge Threat

Black swans are catastrophic events that no one sees coming, while “grey swans,” as the are known, are extreme events for which there’s no historical precedent, but that could still potentially be predicted. A new study takes this concept into the realm of weather and climate, finding that global warming might sharply increase the odds of grey swan… Read More

Large Wildfires Are Now More Common and Destructive

Large Wildfires Are Now More Common and Destructive

The West continues to be a fiery inferno as August starts to fade into September. Wildfires have exploded across the region this month. There have been 115 large wildfires to date including 66 large fires that are still burning. Those fires along with thousands of smaller blazes have contributed to 7.7 million acres burned in the U.S. That puts … Read More

Carbon Emissions From Power Plants Hit 27-Year Low

Carbon Emissions From Power Plants Hit 27-Year Low

As states begin the long task of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from electric power plants to comply with new federal climate policy, a 27-year low in carbon dioxide emissions earlier this year shows the U.S. may be heading toward meeting its emissions goals. U.S. power plants emitted less carbon dioxide — 128 million metric tons — in April … Read More

From Katrina, an ‘Amazing’ Decade of Climate Research

From Katrina, an ‘Amazing’ Decade of Climate Research

During the summer of 2005, Columbia University climate scientists Adam Sobel and Suzana Camargo were planning a workshop on a topic to which only a handful of scientists had given much thought: how the warming climate might alter hurricane activity. “It seemed to us sort of like a small, sort of obscure field,” Sobel said, so the pair didn’t … Read More

Alyson Kenward Talks ‘Danger Days’ on WVM Radio

Alyson Kenward Talks ‘Danger Days’ on WVM Radio

Our senior scientist and research director, Alyson Kenward, spoke with West Virginia Morning's Ashton Marra about the high number of "danger days" that West Virginia's capital city, Charleston, will face as the world warms. Climate change is about to make danger days a lot more common over the next 15 years. Charleston, W.Va., for example, is set… Read More

10 Years Later: Was Warming to Blame for Katrina?

10 Years Later: Was Warming to Blame for Katrina?

In the days after Aug. 29, 2005, when the world watched Hurricane Katrina become one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history, a question reverberated through the public consciousness: Was climate change to blame? This question arose in part because of a desire after such terrible events to understand why they occur. … Read More

Tropical Storm Erika Could Hit Florida By Monday

Tropical Storm Erika Could Hit Florida By Monday

It may just be a dot on the map, but it could be an historic one. Florida has entered the cone of probability in the latest forecast for Tropical Storm Erika. The forecast, from the National Hurricane Center, shows that Erika could make landfall in South Florida. That would end an unprecedented 10-year hurricane drought in Florida, a state that … Read More

Gallery

A Tale of Two Coasts Comparison of early to mid-summer conditions along the eastern seaboard vs. the West Coast.

View Gallery