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Carbon Pricing Helping Farmers Ease Methane Pollution

Carbon Pricing Helping Farmers Ease Methane Pollution

Biogas digesters are helping to protect the climate from methane, which is a far more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. As the world’s appetite for meat and dairy has grown, agriculture has become a bigger cause of global warming than deforestation, and that’s mostly because of the methane released by livestock farming.… Read More

Four Hopeful Clean Energy Trends for Earth Day

Four Hopeful Clean Energy Trends for Earth Day

Earth Day can serve as a reminder not only of the wonders of the natural world, but also of the perils it faces in a changing climate, especially as bad news about global warming seems to come on a daily basis. There are encouraging trends, though, that show progress against the primary cause of climate change — greenhouse gas emissions from human… Read More

Since First Earth Day, U.S. Temps Have Been On the Rise

Since First Earth Day, U.S. Temps Have Been On the Rise

It’s been 45 years since the first Earth Day was celebrated in 1970, and since that time, average temperatures have been rising across the U.S. This Climate Central interactive graphic shows a state-by-state analysis of those temperature trends. Average temperatures across most of the continental U.S. have been rising gradually for more than a… Read More

Major Changes Loom in Arctic as U.S. Leads Council

Major Changes Loom in Arctic as U.S. Leads Council

Just 30 years ago, the Arctic was viewed as a frozen expanse of limited opportunity. But climate change is rapidly reshaping the region — it’s warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet — creating new opportunities and risks that are coming into global focus. “Without climate change, we wouldn’t really be talking about the Arctic in the first… Read More

Scientists Pore Over Warm West, Cold East Divide

Scientists Pore Over Warm West, Cold East Divide

From blooming flowers to twittering birds, the signs of spring are popping up, and the miseries of winter becoming a distant memory for many. But not for some climate scientists. The curiosity of a growing group of researchers has been piqued by the tenacious temperature divide that has separated East from West over the past two winters, as a… Read More

Clean Energy Seeing Global ‘Renaissance’

Clean Energy Seeing Global ‘Renaissance’

An energy renaissance is one of the central messages of the Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) Future of Energy Summit taking place this week in New York City. Bloomberg analysts, government regulators and industry officials in attendance are debating how far renewable electricity has come as prices have fallen… Read More

Three Ways The West Can Adapt To Drought

Three Ways The West Can Adapt To Drought

The current Washington drought could help the West learn to adapt to one of the most profound effects that climate change is projected to bring to the region. Scientists warn that climate change could deliver “megadroughts” to the West, the likes of which haven’t been experienced in more than a millenium. “I’m seeing this year as a dress rehearsal … Read More

Pacific Winds Tied to Warming Slowdown, Dry West

Pacific Winds Tied to Warming Slowdown, Dry West

To understand why the West has been so dry since the turn of the century, cast your eye further west — to the natural waxing and waning of Pacific Ocean winds. Strong trade winds have been forcing heat into ocean depths, contributing to a temporary slowdown in land surface warming over the past 15 to 20 years that some have called a warming hiatus… Read More

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Decades of Warming Despite the recent slowdown in warming rate, this past decade was the world's warmest on record.

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