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Study: Warming May Bring Heightened Salmonella Risk

Study: Warming May Bring Heightened Salmonella Risk

Living along the shoreline may be nice, but a new study suggests that as climate change makes extreme weather and temperature events more frequent, cases of salmonella poisoning may become more prevalent, too, especially in some coastal communities. Each year, it is estimated that 1 million people in the United States become sickened from … Read More

Missing: One Year’s Worth of California Rain

Missing: One Year’s Worth of California Rain

The amount of rain that California has missed out on since the beginning of its record-setting drought in 2012 is about the same amount it would see, on average, in a single year, a new study has concluded. The study’s researchers pin the reason for the lack of rains, as others have, on the absence of the intense rainstorms ushered in by so-called… Read More

What Warming Means for 4 of Summer’s Worst Pests

What Warming Means for 4 of Summer’s Worst Pests

Summer may mean it’s time for outdoor fun in the sun, but it’s also prime time for a number of pests. All that extra time outdoors can bring everything from poison ivy rashes to exposure to Lyme disease from tick bites. And of course there’s that ubiquitous summer menace, the mosquito. With the rising temperatures brought about by global warming… Read More

Warming May Boost Wind Energy in Plains States

Warming May Boost Wind Energy in Plains States

Powerful winds are commonplace in the U.S. prairie states, which experienced walls of dirt swept into the air by these gusts during the Dust Bowl. While today's winds don't often carry the huge quantities of dust that they did in the 1930s, they’re stirring up something significantly more useful in states like Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas – energy. … Read More

U.S. Private Sector Vows To Ante Up On Climate Finance

U.S. Private Sector Vows To Ante Up On Climate Finance

Some of the biggest U.S. corporate names on Monday offered their support - and billions of dollars in green financing pledges - to buttress the Obama administration's quest for a global agreement on combating climate change. Google, Apple, Goldman Sachs and 10 other well-known companies joined the White House in launching the American Business Act… Read More

Rain, Storm Surge Combine to Put U.S. Coasts at Risk

Rain, Storm Surge Combine to Put U.S. Coasts at Risk

After the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, New Orleanians thought they knew what areas were susceptible to flooding during a storm. So when Hurricane Isaac, a much weaker storm than Katrina, bore down on the city in 2012, those who live to the west of Lake Pontchartrain weren’t worried, as they had been spared the raging waters that inundated so… Read More

GAO Report Sees Climate Risks to Army Corps Projects

GAO Report Sees Climate Risks to Army Corps Projects

Thousands of dams, levees, hurricane barriers and flood walls built across the country by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers may be at risk from extreme weather and sea level rise driven by climate change, but the Army Corps has only just begun to assess how vulnerable they are and suffers from a lack of funding, according to a U.S. Government … Read More

Stagnant Summer Days on the Rise in U.S.

Stagnant Summer Days on the Rise in U.S.

Those long, hot, sultry days of summer, the ones where the air seem so still it wouldn’t disturb a leaf, are also days where air quality can take a nosedive. With winds barely above a whisper and atmosphere-scouring rains nowhere in sight, pollutants can build up in the air we breathe, with potentially serious health consequences. Since climate… Read More

Gallery

Early vs. Late Snowmelt Satellite-derived images comparing the first full week of April in years with early (2002) vs. late (2008) snowmelt.

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