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Peak of Tornado Season Shifting Earlier in Tornado Alley

Peak of Tornado Season Shifting Earlier in Tornado Alley

Living in Missouri as a kid, John Long grew up with tornadoes. He went through the same tornado drills that all school children from tornado-prone parts of the country know well: Filing into school hallways and crouching against walls with a textbook or hands covering the head. Tornadoes were a part of life. But growing up, Long said, he and… Read More

Analysts, States Bullish on Success of Clean Power Plan

Analysts, States Bullish on Success of Clean Power Plan

The Obama administration’s proposed plan to slash carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants drew criticism from utilities and bullish predictions from states and analysts Tuesday at the 2014 Carbon Forum in New York. At the International Emissions Trading Association Carbon Forum, held at Morgan Stanley headquarters in Manhattan and … Read More

Pacific Northwest Warming May Have Natural Roots

Pacific Northwest Warming May Have Natural Roots

Dan Nichols was hauling in a gillnet laden with the fruits of a late-season Alaskan salmon run when something heavy flopped out of it, then slid to the front of his boat. “I knew what the tail was,” he says. Surprised, the mustachioed fishing veteran stopped picking salmon from his net and approached the itinerant creature. “I had to stop what I wa… Read More

People’s Climate March Makes Front-Page News

People’s Climate March Makes Front-Page News

When 400,000 people hit the streets, perhaps it isn't surprising that it makes headline news. And that's just what happened on Sunday when the People's Climate March shut down thoroughfares around New York as part of the largest climate action in history. The march drew a wide cross-section of society from public figures like Ban Ki-moon, Al Gore a… Read More

Picture This: Hurricanes and Wildfires from Space

Picture This: Hurricanes and Wildfires from Space

Winds and fire wrought havoc this week as wildfires exploded in Northern California and Hurricane Odile became the most powerful storm to strike Baja California. The devastation of both events was caught in poignant and impactful photos. But other images captured more peaceful tableaus, including the beauty of landscapes erupting in a riot of… Read More

El Niño is Kinda Sorta Maybe Here

El Niño is Kinda Sorta Maybe Here

El Niño watchers, rejoice (maybe). A weak El Niño has formed (sorta). On Tuesday, researchers at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society said a borderline El Niño is upon us, with the odds for further development increasing throughout the fall and winter. This El Niño has played a game of hide and seek since an El Niño Watch… Read More

U.S. Putting Climate-Changing Chemicals on Ice

U.S. Putting Climate-Changing Chemicals on Ice

Say bye, bye, to chemicals that chill your frozen pie. The U.S. is making it clear as ice that it intends to continue moving forward with efforts to clamp down on the use of hydrofluorocarbons, known as HFCs, which are chemicals that helped save the ozone layer — but have put the climate in jeopardy. The chemicals were developed for use in fridge… Read More

Climate Change Threatens Half of North America’s Birds

Climate Change Threatens Half of North America’s Birds

Half of North America’s bird species, from common backyard visitors like the Baltimore oriole and the rufous hummingbird to wilderness dwellers like the common loon and bald eagle, are under threat from climate change and many could go extinct, an exhaustive new study has found. Seven years of research found climate change the biggest threat to Nor… Read More