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West Likely to Be Stormier With Climate Change

West Likely to Be Stormier With Climate Change

The types of storms that have been bringing heavy snow and rain to the West this winter, triggering landslides and floods while easing stubborn droughts, are likely to become stronger and more frequent, according to the results of a conclusive new study. The drenching storms have been falling from atmospheric rivers, which are high-altitude streams… Read More

Climate Change Is Leaving Native Plants Behind

Climate Change Is Leaving Native Plants Behind

Willis Linn Jepson encountered a squat shrub while he was collecting botanical specimens on California’s Mount Tamalpais in the fall of 1936. He trimmed off a few branches and jotted down the location along the ridge trail where the manzanita grew, 2,255 feet above sea level. The desiccated specimen is now part of an herbarium here that’s named … Read More

Climate Economists React to Obama’s Proposed Oil Tax

Climate Economists React to Obama’s Proposed Oil Tax

On Thursday, President Obama dropped a surprise in his transportation plan as part of his annual budget. The plan — dubbed the 21st Century Clean Transportation System — calls for $300 billion in investments over the next decade in high speed rail, driverless cars and mass transit across the U.S. That would cut down on carbon pollution and could … Read More

Hot, Dry Weather Could Cut Into California’s Snowpack

Hot, Dry Weather Could Cut Into California’s Snowpack

Hello, it’s me. Words made famous by Adele could just as easily apply to what’s about to happen in California. An unwelcome call is coming from across the Pacific for a state still struggling with drought. A ridge of high pressure is coming to the state, harkening back to the ridiculously resilient ridge of the past few years and butting into… Read More

The Southwest May Have Entered a ‘Drier Climate State’

The Southwest May Have Entered a ‘Drier Climate State’

The Southwest is already the most arid part of the U.S. Now new research indicates it’s becoming even more dry as wet weather patterns, quite literally, dry up. The change could herald a pattern shift and raises the specter of megadrought in the region. “We see a very intense trend in the Southwest,” Andreas Prein, a postdoctoral researcher at the … Read More

These Paintings Turn Climate Data Into Art

These Paintings Turn Climate Data Into Art

Climate data is usually seen in pixels, spreadsheets and maps. But watercolors? Not so much. That’s what makes a growing series of paintings by Maine-based artist Jill Pelto so striking. They combine imagery from the natural world with hard data showing the impact climate change is having. The message can be subtle, with the global average … Read More

California Narrowly Upholds Key Policy For Solar Growth

California Narrowly Upholds Key Policy For Solar Growth

California delivered a narrow victory to the solar industry this week by maintaining a policy that has underpinned rooftop solar's dramatic growth while introducing fees that were smaller than utilities requested. After two years of rancorous debate, California's Public Utilities Commission upheld net metering by a vote of 3-to-2, allowing … Read More

El Niño Is Here, So Why Is California Still in Drought?

El Niño Is Here, So Why Is California Still in Drought?

A parade of El Niño-fueled storms has marched over California in the last few weeks, bringing bouts of much needed rain and snow to the parched state. But maps of drought conditions there have barely budged, with nearly two-thirds of the state still in the worst two categories of drought. So what gives? The short answer, experts say, is that the… Read More

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US Temperature Projections If current trends in burning coal and other fossil fuels continue, average temperatures in the U.S. are projected to increase

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