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Global Economy Becoming Less Energy Intense

Global Economy Becoming Less Energy Intense

The amount of coal, oil, gas and renewable energy used by the global economy is falling quickly, a clear sign that economic growth is having less of an impact on climate change than in the past, according to new data from the U.S. Department of Energy. The measure of the amount of energy that is used per unit of gross domestic product is known as … Read More

The Hottest Cities in U.S. vs. the Fastest Warming

The Hottest Cities in U.S. vs. the Fastest Warming

Searing heat is the signature of climate change, and the scorching summer temperatures blanketing much of the nation this week are exactly what we should expect in an ever warming world. With the mercury rising, a host of Midwestern cities are forecast to see their hottest weather of the year. This comes on the heels of the hottest June ever … Read More

Warming Could Mean More Algae Blooms Like Florida’s

Warming Could Mean More Algae Blooms Like Florida’s

Nearly 240 square miles of Lake Okeechobee, the largest freshwater lake in Florida, are covered in a scum of blue-green algae that has also traveled down nearby waterways and out to the coastline. The stinking sludge has impacted local ecosystems and the tourism industry and caused Gov. Rick Scott to declare a state of emergency in the affected… Read More

Global Climate Spending Focusing on Forest Protection

Global Climate Spending Focusing on Forest Protection

Forests straddling the equator are critical to a stable climate because they store vast amounts of carbon, and a new study finds that the U.S. and four other developed countries are spending billions of dollars to keep those forests intact. An analysis of how the U.S., Japan, Germany, France and Norway have donated money to climate change … Read More

‘Is It Too Much to Ask to Breathe Clean Air?’

‘Is It Too Much to Ask to Breathe Clean Air?’

Cassandra Martin’s journey as a community leader began in 2008 when she moved into an Oakland shelter after losing her job of 17 years. One of her roommates in the shelter went to an orientation led by the Environmental Indicators Project. She returned with a pamphlet that Martin remembers reading over and over. Within a few weeks, in early 2009,… Read More

Trying to Save an Endangered Islands’ Cultural Heritage

Trying to Save an Endangered Islands’ Cultural Heritage

Along a pier in San Pedro, Calif., a small fishing community brings in their catch each day, the salty breeze mingling with the smell of fish. This, says Bauea Crosby, is the only place nearby that reminds her of home. Bauea is a high school and community college teacher in nearby Concord. But for her, home is thousands of miles away in the small… Read More

Threat to Salmon Imperils Alaska’s Culture

Threat to Salmon Imperils Alaska’s Culture

Standing chest deep in the cold waters of the Kenai River, I can see salmon skim the surface of the water farther out in the middle of the river. I feel the tug in the big net I hold in the current and run up on shore with the net in tow to pull out the salmon. Glistening on the sand, this fish is one of the many my family will catch this summer… Read More

Efficiency, Clean Energy Put Dent in CO2 Emissions

Efficiency, Clean Energy Put Dent in CO2 Emissions

Americans are using less electricity as buildings become more energy-efficient and industrial power demand weakens, and a new report says that is leading to three trends: Declining carbon dioxide emissions, low electric power prices and the decline of coal, which has until recently been the primary fuel used to produce electricity. Some of the … Read More

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Maximum Great Lakes Ice Cover on Decline Maximum ice cover on the Great Lakes is way down this year and on a long term downward trend.

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