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Stories from Climate Central's Science Journalists and Content Partners

Solar Energy Jobs Growing By Leaps and Bounds

Solar Energy Jobs Growing By Leaps and Bounds

The solar sector is growing so quickly as solar panel costs drop that employment in the industry jumped 21.8 percent in 2014, adding 31,000 new jobs in that time for a total of 174,000 solar workers nationwide, Luecke said. Solar employment is expected to jump by another 36,000 workers this year.… Read More

Global Warming Upped Heat Driving California’s Drought

Global Warming Upped Heat Driving California’s Drought

Another dismal wet season is nearly behind California. Extremely low snowpack in the Sierra Nevada has conspired with warm temperatures to keep the state in the grips of one its worst droughts on record for at least another year. The precipitation has been the key ingredient to start the drought, but heat has played an important role in maintainin… Read More

Climate Adaptation Experts Help Prepare for Disaster

Climate Adaptation Experts Help Prepare for Disaster

In 2008, floods in Thailand forced the temporary closure of four Nike factories, costing the company millions of dollars. In 2012, Hurricane Sandy demolished Verizon’s copper-wire infrastructure on the U.S. eastern seaboard, costing thousands of Verizon customers service and the company $1 billion in repair costs. Extreme weather … Read More

Sunny Side East: Solar Takes Off in Eastern U.S.

Sunny Side East: Solar Takes Off in Eastern U.S.

North Carolina is leaping ahead of California for the amount of new utility-scale solar farms currently under development, as eastern U.S. utilities find ways to catch their own rays of sunshine, a new SNL Energy report released Wednesday shows … Read More

For the West, A Winter That Has Felt More Like Spring

For the West, A Winter That Has Felt More Like Spring

From San Diego to Seattle, February has looked — and felt — a lot more like April. Flowers that normally wouldn’t start to bud until well into spring have already started to blossom and grow. Residents have been walking around in t-shirts and shorts, a rarity even for Southern California winters. “Winter has seemed to have completely forgotten… Read More

Obama’s Keystone XL Veto Not a Death Blow to Pipeline

Obama’s Keystone XL Veto Not a Death Blow to Pipeline

President Obama on Tuesday vetoed the bill Congress passed Feb. 11 forcing approval of the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline. But it isn’t dead yet, and the U.S. State Department’s long approval process for the project continues. … Read More

Here’s Where Ocean Acidification Will Hit the U.S. Hardest

Here’s Where Ocean Acidification Will Hit the U.S. Hardest

U.S. coastal communities better start preparing for ocean acidification now, especially if we want scallops, oysters and other shellfish to keep appearing on our dinnerplates. That’s the message of a new study that shows that shellfisheries across the U.S. are more vulnerable to climate change’s less considered counterpart than previously thought … Read More

Last Tango for Nuclear?

Last Tango for Nuclear?

Everybody loves a comeback story. If you like the U.S. nuclear power industry, it’s a Michael Jordan-type gallant return. If you don’t like nukes, it’s more of a Gloria Swanson gruesome comeback in Sunset Boulevard. Similar to both Jordan and Swanson’s character, Norma Desmond, the industry has tried more than one revival. The current one may be m… Read More