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The Southwest May Have Entered a ‘Drier Climate State’

The Southwest May Have Entered a ‘Drier Climate State’

The Southwest is already the most arid part of the U.S. Now new research indicates it’s becoming even more dry as wet weather patterns, quite literally, dry up. The change could herald a pattern shift and raises the specter of megadrought in the region. “We see a very intense trend in the Southwest,” Andreas Prein, a postdoctoral researcher at the … Read More

These Tiny Satellites Could Keep an Eye on Wildfires

These Tiny Satellites Could Keep an Eye on Wildfires

Close your eyes. Imagine a world where satellites smaller than a shoebox could tell you about every fire burning on earth. Now open them. You’re living in that world (or at least you will be in just a few years). NASA has announced an ambitious plan to surround the earth with hundreds of tiny satellites that could monitor wildfires in near real … Read More

Two Maps Show Why El Niño is Rising to 1997-98 Levels

Two Maps Show Why El Niño is Rising to 1997-98 Levels

In case there was any doubt, NASA has released a reminder that this El Niño is big, likely to get bigger (maybe even record-setting) and that the weather is likely to be anything but normal through this winter for much of the U.S. A new set of maps published by the NASA Earth Observatory show that oceans are getting close to replicating the 1997 … Read More

Climate Change Could Put Tribes’ Electric Systems at Risk

Climate Change Could Put Tribes’ Electric Systems at Risk

Heat waves, extreme storms, wildfire and other effects of climate change pose major threats to the electric power systems in Native American communities across the country, most significantly in the West and Southwest, according to a new U.S. Department of Energy report. “Tribes are among the communities most vulnerable to the impacts of climate … Read More

Large Wildfires Are Now More Common and Destructive

Large Wildfires Are Now More Common and Destructive

The West continues to be a fiery inferno as August starts to fade into September. Wildfires have exploded across the region this month. There have been 115 large wildfires to date including 66 large fires that are still burning. Those fires along with thousands of smaller blazes have contributed to 7.7 million acres burned in the U.S. That puts … Read More

U.S. Summers Bringing More and More Heat

U.S. Summers Bringing More and More Heat

It’s officially summer! We have now passed the points that mark the traditional start to summer (Memorial Day), the meteorological start (June 1), and now the astronomical start, or summer solstice (June 21) — so break out those flip-flops and beach towels! Though June, July, and August usually bring the heat, for parts of the country spring felt … Read More

Ocean Species Set for Reshuffle Unseen in 3 Million Years

Ocean Species Set for Reshuffle Unseen in 3 Million Years

The world’s oceans could face a massive reshuffling by the end of the century, the likes of which hasn’t been seen in as many as 3 million years, due to warming waters. Changes are already afoot in the oceans. Roughly 93 percent of the heat trapped by human greenhouse gas emissions is ending up in the world’s seas and already contributing to … Read More

Will The West Ever Be Able To Live With Fire?

Will The West Ever Be Able To Live With Fire?

Scientific progress and more than a century of living with wildfire have boosted Western resilience to the threat. But improvements in how wildfire dangers have been managed have fallen far short of the reimaginations of landscapes that are needed. “We’ve made good progress, but not good enough,” Jan van Wagtendonk, a retired Yosemite National Par… Read More

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Record Low Maximum for Arctic Sea Ice This year’s annual maximum of winter Arctic sea ice is the lowest in the satellite record.

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