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From Katrina, an ‘Amazing’ Decade of Climate Research

From Katrina, an ‘Amazing’ Decade of Climate Research

During the summer of 2005, Columbia University climate scientists Adam Sobel and Suzana Camargo were planning a workshop on a topic to which only a handful of scientists had given much thought: how the warming climate might alter hurricane activity. “It seemed to us sort of like a small, sort of obscure field,” Sobel said, so the pair didn’t … Read More

10 Years Later: Was Warming to Blame for Katrina?

10 Years Later: Was Warming to Blame for Katrina?

In the days after Aug. 29, 2005, when the world watched Hurricane Katrina become one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history, a question reverberated through the public consciousness: Was climate change to blame? This question arose in part because of a desire after such terrible events to understand why they occur. … Read More

Tropical Storm Erika Could Hit Florida By Monday

Tropical Storm Erika Could Hit Florida By Monday

It may just be a dot on the map, but it could be an historic one. Florida has entered the cone of probability in the latest forecast for Tropical Storm Erika. The forecast, from the National Hurricane Center, shows that Erika could make landfall in South Florida. That would end an unprecedented 10-year hurricane drought in Florida, a state that … Read More

Scientists Foresee Losses as Cities Fight Beach Erosion

Scientists Foresee Losses as Cities Fight Beach Erosion

Beaches are facing off against a changing climate, and they’re losing ground. Literally. Waves, currents, storms and people all move the sand that make beaches, well, beaches. But a combination of rising sea levels, stronger coastal storms and coastal development means that sandy shorelines are increasingly disappearing, leaving the millions who … Read More

All of 2015’s Rain for the U.S. in 14 Seconds

All of 2015’s Rain for the U.S. in 14 Seconds

It’s no secret that it has been really wet in the Southeast and really dry out West over the first half of the year. But to really understand the split and how we got here, NASA has a helpful, color recap of the year in rain. The imagery comes courtesy of the agency’s Global Precipitation Measurement constellation of satellites. In February last … Read More

What Warming Means for 4 of Summer’s Worst Pests

What Warming Means for 4 of Summer’s Worst Pests

Summer may mean it’s time for outdoor fun in the sun, but it’s also prime time for a number of pests. All that extra time outdoors can bring everything from poison ivy rashes to exposure to Lyme disease from tick bites. And of course there’s that ubiquitous summer menace, the mosquito. With the rising temperatures brought about by global warming… Read More

Rain, Storm Surge Combine to Put U.S. Coasts at Risk

Rain, Storm Surge Combine to Put U.S. Coasts at Risk

After the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, New Orleanians thought they knew what areas were susceptible to flooding during a storm. So when Hurricane Isaac, a much weaker storm than Katrina, bore down on the city in 2012, those who live to the west of Lake Pontchartrain weren’t worried, as they had been spared the raging waters that inundated so… Read More

Google to Convert Coal Power Plant to Data Center

Google to Convert Coal Power Plant to Data Center

Google will convert an old coal-fired power plant in rural Alabama into a data center powered by renewable power, expanding the company’s move into the energy world. The technology giant said on Wednesday that it would open its 14th data centre inside the grounds of the old coal plant, and had reached a deal with the Tennessee Valley Authority.… Read More

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