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Rising Tides: How Near-Daily Flooding of America’s Shorelines Could Become the Norm

Rising Tides: How Near-Daily Flooding of America’s Shorelines Could Become the Norm

One morning last October, Miami’s municipal government issued a warning to drivers in the area: they should avoid much of the city’s center, because it had been inundated. “Today, Miami is flooding as if a hurricane went through it,” the city’s mayor wrote on Twitter. No hurricane had hit Miami that week. The flooding was the result of a “king… Read More

As Seas Rise, Americans Use Nature to Fight Worsening Erosion

As Seas Rise, Americans Use Nature to Fight Worsening Erosion

The grassy yard behind Jennifer McPeak’s house was slipping into Marler Bayou, its edge giving way as waves beat against it. She planned to stem the losses with a $14,000 seawall until a Florida permitting official suggested an alternative — marsh seedlings and bags of oyster shells arranged to blossom into a “living shoreline.” A few years later, … Read More

Miami Just Had Its Hottest Month on Record

Miami Just Had Its Hottest Month on Record

Summers in Miami are always hot and humid, but this summer has been one for the record books. July was the hottest month ever recorded for the city, with temperature archives going back to 1896, and capped off what has been the hottest year-to-date. Every day except July 31 saw a high temperature at or above 90°F (32°C), and nighttime low … Read More

South Miami Just Made a Huge Rooftop Solar Decision

South Miami Just Made a Huge Rooftop Solar Decision

South Miami this week became the first city outside of California to require all new homes to install solar panels on their roofs. Six cities in the Golden State began requiring solar to be installed on new homes over the past few years. But in Florida, where voters killed proposed solar restrictions last year, South Miami is now a pioneer. This… Read More

Houston Fears Warming Will Cause Catastrophic Flooding

Houston Fears Warming Will Cause Catastrophic Flooding

Sam Brody is not a real estate agent, but when his friends want to move home they get in touch to ask for advice. He is a flood impact expert in Houston — and he has plenty of work to keep him busy. The Texas metropolis has more casualties and property loss from floods than any other locality in the U.S., according to data stretching back to 1960 … Read More

NOAA Forecasts Busy Hurricane Season for Atlantic

NOAA Forecasts Busy Hurricane Season for Atlantic

Less than a year after Hurricane Matthew raked the East Coast, killing 34 people and causing $10 billion in damage in the U.S. alone, coastal areas are once again preparing for the onset of the Atlantic hurricane season. This year, forecasters with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are expecting to see above-average storm numbers… Read More

Electric Cars Becoming Popular As Grid Gets Greener

Electric Cars Becoming Popular As Grid Gets Greener

KNOXVILLE, TENN. — The amount of heat-trapping pollution that’s released every time Bill Williams drives his electric sedan a mile down a road here has fallen by about a quarter in the three years since he bought it. Williams’ car hasn’t changed, but the electricity that powers it has. In Tennessee, power once generated overwhelmingly by coal has… Read More

U.S. Drought at Lowest Level in Nearly Two Decades

U.S. Drought at Lowest Level in Nearly Two Decades

After years of intense, record-setting drought across the U.S., particularly in the Great Plains and California, the country is now experiencing its lowest level of drought in the 17 years since the U.S. Drought Monitor began its weekly updates. Less than 5 percent of the U.S. was in some stage of drought as of May 4, the most recent update… Read More

Gallery

Global Sea Level Rise by Century A new report constructs a sea level timeline going way back. Hard to miss the human influence in the 20th century.

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