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In Wake of Sandy, NOAA Alters Hurricane Warning Policy

In Wake of Sandy, NOAA Alters Hurricane Warning Policy

Ahead of the 2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season and in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, the National Weather Service announced today that it is changing its policy on the issuance of tropical storm and hurricane watches and warnings. Beginning on June 1, the agency will be permitted to leave these watches and warnings in effect even if a hurricane transiti… Read More

The World’s Poorest Nations Say Yes to Emissions Cuts

The World’s Poorest Nations Say Yes to Emissions Cuts

In what could be a far-reaching move, the world's poorest countries say they are now prepared to commit themselves to binding cuts in their emissions of greenhouse gases. The move has the potential to quicken the pace of the glacially-slow U.N. negotiations, which have for years been trying to agree an effective way to cut emissions in order to … Read More

New Process May Make Renewable Energy Reliable at Last

New Process May Make Renewable Energy Reliable at Last

Solar energy is virtually limitless, generates no planet-warming greenhouse gases — and is useless between sunset and sunrise. Wind energy is also plentiful and emits no carbon, and it can be harvested day or night, but not when the air is calm. A discovery announced in Thursday’s issue of Science may offer a way around these daunting problems, … Read More

Why the Globe Hasn’t Warmed Much for the Past Decade

Why the Globe Hasn’t Warmed Much for the Past Decade

Even the quickest glance at a graph of global temperatures makes it clear that the planet was warming sharply during the 1980s and 1990s. But while the 2000s were the hottest decade on record, the rate of warming slowed considerably after the turn of the current century — even while human emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions have … Read More

For Engineers, Climate Failure Becomes an Option

For Engineers, Climate Failure Becomes an Option

Civil engineers build rugged things designed to last for decades, like roads, bridges, culverts and water treatment plants. But a University of New Hampshire professor wants his profession to become much more flexible. In a changing climate, civil engineer Paul Kirshen argues, facilities will have to adapt to changing conditions over their useful … Read More

Rules Needed for Geoengineering Research, Experts Say

Rules Needed for Geoengineering Research, Experts Say

With no clear rules to guide new research, scientists are shying away from examining whether geoengineering technologies can effectively cool the planet, and at what cost. That’s the warning put forth by a pair of climate change experts in an essay published Thursday in the journal Science, which argues that the global geoengineering debate is in… Read More

Forecast Dims for Future Growth in Wind Power

Forecast Dims for Future Growth in Wind Power

Despite a recent report trumpeting a record year for wind power in 2012, the numbers are not as encouraging as they seem. Because even though total wind power capacity grew by 30 percent last year, with 13,000 megawatts in new wind turbines, the actual portion of our electricity coming from wind energy did not increase proportionally. Also, the … Read More

Volcanic Eruptions May be Masking ‘Lost’ Warming

Volcanic Eruptions May be Masking ‘Lost’ Warming

Climate scientists think they may have found at least part of the answer to a conundrum which has been puzzling them recently — why the atmosphere has not warmed as much as expected over the last decade or so. A team led by the University of Colorado-Boulder (CU-Boulder) thinks the reason may be emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO2), a known … Read More