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Here’s the Climate Context For the Fort McMurray Wildfire

Here’s the Climate Context For the Fort McMurray Wildfire

An unusually intense May wildfire roared into Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on Tuesday, forcing the largest wildfire evacuation in province history. The flames rode the back of hot, windy weather that will continue through Wednesday and could pick up again this weekend. The wildfire is the latest in a lengthening lineage of early wildfires in no… Read More

Indigenous Stories Are Filling Gaps in Climate Data

Indigenous Stories Are Filling Gaps in Climate Data

Canadian scientists have collected stories from more than 90,000 people whose traditional ways of life rely on nature, in an effort to capture signs of climate change where weather stations are absent. Their findings, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, fill a knowledge gap in climate change science, which is dominated by data and… Read More

Warming to Bring ‘Epidemic’ of Heat-Related Injuries

Warming to Bring ‘Epidemic’ of Heat-Related Injuries

Workers in fields and factories face an epidemic of heat-related injuries that will devastate their health, income and productivity as climate change takes hold, a major UN report has warned. Productivity losses alone could rise above $2tn by 2030, as outdoor employees in many regions slow their pace, take longer breaks and shift their work to… Read More

Satellite Shows U.S. Has the Most Gas Flares in the World

Satellite Shows U.S. Has the Most Gas Flares in the World

Drive through many oil and gas fields in the U.S. and one thing stands out above the pumpjacks and storage tanks, especially at night — steadily flickering flames. Those flames are known as gas flares, which burn off excess natural gas from crude oil and natural gas wells across the globe. Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric … Read More

Strong El Niño Helped Lower U.S. Heating Costs

Strong El Niño Helped Lower U.S. Heating Costs

Was your heating bill a bit friendlier to your wallet this winter? If so, there’s a good chance you can thank El Niño. The exceptionally strong El Niño in the Pacific has been driving chaotic weather across the globe for months, but it also contributed to a mild winter in the U.S., which was about 15 percent warmer than the winter of 2014-2015.… Read More

2016 Election Critical to Success of Paris Climate Pact

2016 Election Critical to Success of Paris Climate Pact

The 2016 presidential election is likely to be enormously consequential to the success of the Paris climate agreement, due to be signed Friday at the United Nations, and the ability of the United States to lead the world in reducing greenhouse gas emissions to keep global warming to “well below” 2°C (3.6°F).… Read More

Studies Show Link Between Red Meat and Climate Change

Studies Show Link Between Red Meat and Climate Change

Shifting diets away from meat could slash in half per capita greenhouse gas emissions related to eating habits worldwide and ward off additional deforestation — a major contributor to climate change, according to new scientific findings published this week. The consequences of land use change stemming from expanding agricultural production were … Read More

Rooftops in Cloudy Places Could Be Solar Gold Mines

Rooftops in Cloudy Places Could Be Solar Gold Mines

Nestled on the eastern shore of Lake Erie, Buffalo is considered one of the cloudiest, dreariest cities in the U.S. — not exactly the first place many people consider prime real estate for solar power development. But Buffalonians have good reason to be excited about rooftop solar, and not just because a solar panel factory is creating jobs… Read More

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20 Big U.S. Cities that Should Worry About Sea Level Rise 20 U.S. cities with populations over 300,000 that are most likely to be dramatically affected by sea level rise.

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