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Alaska’s Glaciers Seen as Major Source of Sea Level Rise

Alaska’s Glaciers Seen as Major Source of Sea Level Rise

The ice that tumbles into the ocean along Alaska’s coastline often makes for dramatic images that show one of the ravages of climate change – melting tidewater glaciers that contribute to sea level rise. But a new study finds that far more meltwater is flowing into the sea from a similar, if less frequently photographed source – inland glaciers. … Read More

Study Suggests Key Role for Warming in Extreme Weather

Study Suggests Key Role for Warming in Extreme Weather

When massive storms inundate coastlines or a veritable snowpocalypse keeps a city buried for days, the first question on many minds is: Was climate change to blame? It may play more of a role than previous studies have suggested, according to scientists who advocate a different approach to searching for the fingerprints of warming in extreme … Read More

U.S. Weather in 16 Prize-Winning Images

U.S. Weather in 16 Prize-Winning Images

The winners have been announced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s “Weather in Focus” photo contest, which sought to acknowledge the best snapshots of weather or the science used to forecast the weather, climate and water.… Read More

Climate Change Could Melt Everest Region’s Glaciers

Climate Change Could Melt Everest Region’s Glaciers

The Dudh Koshi basin spans 1 million acres and includes some of world’s tallest peaks including Mount Everest. Glaciers tumble down from the highest reaches to the valleys below, shaping the landscape and culture of the region. But climate change has the jagged tongues of ice that define the region primed for a major meltdown. A new study … Read More

The ABCs of Antarctic Ice Shelf Melting

The ABCs of Antarctic Ice Shelf Melting

January 1995 marked a seminal moment in modern Antarctic history, with the crumbling of the Larsen A ice shelf, a floating plain of ice fed by glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula. Less than a decade later, its southern neighbor, the Larsen B ice shelf, disintegrated, stunning polar scientists. After the spectacular collapses of Larsen A and B… Read More

The Surprising Link Between Fjords and Carbon

The Surprising Link Between Fjords and Carbon

The magnificent, steep-sided fjords that slice deeply into the coastlines of New Zealand, Norway and Alaska are hugely popular attractions for tourists. But they may be surprisingly important to the Earth’s climate system as well. While fjords make up just one tenth of one percent of the oceans’ surface area they account for about 11 percent … Read More

New NASA Satellite Gets the Dirt on Soil Moisture

New NASA Satellite Gets the Dirt on Soil Moisture

Tracking soil moisture is a dirty job, but someone’s gotta do it. Soil moisture is a critical indicator of drought. For decades, ground observations have done the heavy lifting but they’re few and far between. That’s why NASA spent $1 billion to launch a soil moisture monitoring satellite earlier this year. After months of calibration, the… Read More

Scientists Turn to Drones For Closer Look at Sea Ice

Scientists Turn to Drones For Closer Look at Sea Ice

An oceanographer at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is calling on a 21st century technology to understand exactly how the floating ice that clogs the world’s northernmost seas every winter breaks up and melts.… Read More

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Copenhagen Diagnosis Graphics informed by the Copenhagen Diagnosis, a major climate change report released on November 24, 2009.

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