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Warming Air Was Trigger for Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse

Warming Air Was Trigger for Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse

It was clear to anyone who went to Antarctica in the summer of 2001-02 that it was an unusually warm one — record-setting, in fact — and just one in a series of warm austral summers. In December 2001, geologic oceanographer Eugene Domack, now at the University of South Florida, was part of an expedition sampling the Southern Ocean seafloor around… Read More

The Good and Bad Climate News from Permafrost Melt

The Good and Bad Climate News from Permafrost Melt

Earth’s subterranean carbon blisters are starting to pop. Carbon inside now-melting permafrost is oozing out, leaving scientists scrambling to figure out just how much of it is ending up in the atmosphere. Whether recent findings from research that attempted to help answer this question are good or bad climate news might depend on whether you see … Read More

NASA Releases Blizzard of Precipitation Data

NASA Releases Blizzard of Precipitation Data

Have you been itching to see the most detailed collection of precipitation data ever pulled together? (Join the club) Well, you’re in luck. NASA has just released a vast trove of snow, rain, hail and more liquid measurements from a satellite launched earlier this year. In late February, NASA and an international cohort of space programs launched t… Read More

What Global Warming Might Mean for Extreme Snowfalls

What Global Warming Might Mean for Extreme Snowfalls

So if the world is warming, that means winters should be less snowy, right? Well, it’s a bit more complicated than that. OK, it’s a lot more complicated. While the average annual snowfall in most parts of the world is indeed expected to decline, the extreme snowfalls — those that hit a place once every 10 or 20 years and can cause major headaches… Read More

Antarctic Riddle: How Much Will the South Pole Melt?

Antarctic Riddle: How Much Will the South Pole Melt?

One of the biggest question marks surrounding the fate of the planet’s coastlines is dangling from its underbelly. The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet has long been a relatively minor factor in the steady ascent of high-water marks, responsible for about an eighth of the 3 millimeters of annual sea-level rise. But when it comes to climate change… Read More

What Iceland’s Volcanoes Can Teach Us about Climate

What Iceland’s Volcanoes Can Teach Us about Climate

It’s not quite a sharknado, but the possible impending eruption of a mile-high volcano under Iceland’s largest glacier represents a fascinating example of a real-life natural disaster combo—quite literally fire and ice. Seismologists have detected some 3,000 tremors in the vicinity of Bárðarbunga since Saturday, a sign that the mountain might just … Read More

Epic Drought in West is Literally Moving Mountains

Epic Drought in West is Literally Moving Mountains

Some parts of California’s mountains have been uplifted up to 15 mm in the last 18 months because the massive amount of water lost in the drought is no longer weighing down the land, causing it to rise a bit like an uncoiled spring, a new study shows.… Read More

Here’s How Arctic Sea Ice Could Shrink Even More

Here’s How Arctic Sea Ice Could Shrink Even More

Climate change is the main driver behind receding Arctic sea ice. As summer ice shrinks further, it’s causing a host of other changes including the growth of large waves in the previously iced-over areas. Those waves could potentially hasten the demise of sea ice, leading to further changes in the fragile region. Changes brought on by global warmi… Read More