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Hurricanes Boost Carbon Storage in Southeastern Forests

Hurricanes Boost Carbon Storage in Southeastern Forests

Hurricanes hitting the Southeast coast can supercharge the region’s forests, spurring them to store more than 100 times the carbon released annually by all vehicles in the U.S., Duke University researchers have found. Rainfall associated with hurricanes acts as fuel for photosynthesis, drastically increasing trees’ carbon absorption rates… Read More

Paris Pact Could Benefit From Halt of Fossil Fuel Leases

Paris Pact Could Benefit From Halt of Fossil Fuel Leases

Phasing out federal coal, oil and gas leasing on public lands in the U.S. could make a small but significant contribution toward the international goal of keeping global warming to 2°C (3.6°F), according to a paper published Tuesday by the Stockholm Environment Institute. Shutting down all federal oil, gas and coal leasing would lead to a … Read More

Indigenous Stories Are Filling Gaps in Climate Data

Indigenous Stories Are Filling Gaps in Climate Data

Canadian scientists have collected stories from more than 90,000 people whose traditional ways of life rely on nature, in an effort to capture signs of climate change where weather stations are absent. Their findings, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, fill a knowledge gap in climate change science, which is dominated by data and… Read More

Fate of World’s Coastlines Rests on Melting Antarctic Ice

Fate of World’s Coastlines Rests on Melting Antarctic Ice

Mayors from small towns, planners from the world’s largest cities and U.N. diplomats are being guided on the details of a looming coastal crisis by sea level projections compiled by a U.N. science panel. The panel’s work includes warnings about the amount of flooding that could be caused by melting in Antarctica, and those warnings have been… Read More

Sinking Atlantic Coastline Meets Rapidly Rising Seas

Sinking Atlantic Coastline Meets Rapidly Rising Seas

Geological changes along the East Coast are causing land to sink along the seaboard. That’s exacerbating the flood-inducing effects of sea level rise, which has been occurring faster in the western Atlantic Ocean than elsewhere in recent years. New research using GPS and prehistoric data has shown that nearly the entire coast is affected, from… Read More

Greenland’s Melt Season Started Nearly Two Months Early

Greenland’s Melt Season Started Nearly Two Months Early

To say the 2016 Greenland melt season is off to the races is an understatement. Warm, wet conditions rapidly kicked off the melt season this weekend, more than a month-and-a-half ahead of schedule. It has easily set a record for earliest melt season onset, and marks the first time it’s begun in April. Little to no melt through winter is the norm … Read More

Carbon Pollution Seen As Key Driver of Sea Level Rise

Carbon Pollution Seen As Key Driver of Sea Level Rise

New computer modeling has shown that human influences were responsible for two-thirds of sea level rise from 1970 to 2005. By contrast, natural forces were responsible for about two-thirds of the rise in sea levels detected from 1900 to 1950. “We’re driving sea levels at the moment,” said Aimee Slangen, a researcher with Australia’s federal … Read More

Climate Change is Altering How the Poles Drift

Climate Change is Altering How the Poles Drift

The spin of the earth is a constant in our lives. It’s quite literally why night follows day. And while that cycle isn’t going away, climate change is messing with the axis upon which our fair planet spins. Ice melting has caused a drift in polar motion, a somewhat esoteric term that tells scientists a lot about past and future climate and is … Read More

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Historical Probability of a White Christmas Dreams of a White Christmas are most likely to come true this year in the western U.S.

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