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The Race to Understand Black Carbon’s Climate Impact

The Race to Understand Black Carbon’s Climate Impact

On a morning in September 2015, sterile, gray Arctic light filtered through a blanket of woolly clouds as Matt Gunsch and Tate Barrett parked their rented pickup truck on a dirt road and clomped in rubber boots down a long, icy boardwalk to their air-monitoring laboratory on the tundra. From the outside, the lab looked unglamorous — a dingy, white… Read More

Sharp Rise in Flooding Ahead for World’s Poorest

Sharp Rise in Flooding Ahead for World’s Poorest

Coastal residents of poor and fast-growing tropical countries face rapid increases in the numbers of once-rare floods they may face as seas rise, with a new statistical analysis offering troubling projections for regions where sea level data is sparse. Stark increases in instances of flooding are projected for Pacific islands, parts of Southeast … Read More

America’s Most Vulnerable to Rising Seas

America’s Most Vulnerable to Rising Seas

Coastal communities are enduring growing flood risks from rising seas, with places like Atlantic City, sandwiched between a bay and the ocean, facing some of the greatest threats. Guided by new research by Climate Central’s Scott Kulp and Benjamin Strauss, reporter John Upton and photographer Ted Blanco chronicled the plight of this city’s… Read More

The Larsen C Ice Shelf Crack Just Sprouted a New Branch

The Larsen C Ice Shelf Crack Just Sprouted a New Branch

Winter has descended on Antarctica. Even as cold and darkness blankets the bottom of the world, the region’s most watched ice shelf is is continuing its epic breakdown. A crack started spreading across the Larsen C ice shelf in 2010, reaching 100 miles in length in February. Researchers with Project MIDAS, a British group monitoring the ice shelf… Read More

100 Days of Climate

100 Days of Climate

Addressing climate change using sound science is crucial not just for the U.S., but for the world. Unfortunately, that appears unlikely over the next four years under the Trump administration, which has shown signs of being apathetic if not outright hostile to climate science and science-based policies to rein in carbon pollution. Trump has… Read More

U.S. Vulnerable to Worst of Extreme Sea Rise

U.S. Vulnerable to Worst of Extreme Sea Rise

The beginning of a collapse this century of sections of the Antarctic ice sheet would disproportionately inundate coasts circling the U.S. — the country that has done more than any other to pollute the climate. While such a cataclysmic outcome of warming temperatures from greenhouse gas pollution is considered unlikely, recent studies have shown … Read More

Extreme Sea Level Rise and the Stakes for America

Extreme Sea Level Rise and the Stakes for America

Should a newly published sea level rise scenario come to pass, hundreds of American landmarks, neighborhoods, towns and cities would be submerged this century, at least in the absence of engineering massive, costly and unprecedented defenses and relocating major infrastructure. Ocean waters would cover land currently home to more than 12 million… Read More

Climate Change Altering the Arctic Faster Than Expected

Climate Change Altering the Arctic Faster Than Expected

Evidence continues to mount that climate change has pushed the Arctic into a new state. Skyrocketing temperatures are altering the essence of the region, melting ice on land and sea, driving more intense wildfires, altering ocean circulation and dissolving permafrost. A new report chronicles all these changes and warns that even if the world … Read More

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All the Ice on Greenland Greenland holds enough ice to raise global sea level 23 feet or to fill the Lower 48 states 2,940 feet high, like a bathtub.

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