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El Niño Can Raise Sea Levels Along U.S. Coast

El Niño Can Raise Sea Levels Along U.S. Coast

The El Niño event underway in the Pacific Ocean is impacting temperature and weather patterns around the world. But its effects aren’t confined to the atmosphere: A new study has found that the cyclical climate phenomenon can ratchet up sea levels off the West Coast by almost 8 inches over just a few seasons. The findings have important… Read More

10 Years After Katrina, Slow Hurricane Season Expected

10 Years After Katrina, Slow Hurricane Season Expected

As the 10th anniversary of the busiest hurricane season on record approaches, forecasters and government officials are preparing for the start of the 2015 season. But unlike the 2005 season, which saw an unprecedented 28 storms — including one of the worst, Hurricane Katrina — this season is expected to see fewer than the average number of… Read More

Bad News Keeps Flowing From Antarctica

Bad News Keeps Flowing From Antarctica

The massive shelves of ice that ring Antarctica have been shrinking over the past couple of decades, and that could have grave implications for sea level rise. It’s not the ice shelves themselves that pose a problem: they’re mostly afloat, so when they melt or dump massive icebergs, it doesn’t affect water levels any more than melting ice cubes … Read More

The ABCs of Antarctic Ice Shelf Melting

The ABCs of Antarctic Ice Shelf Melting

January 1995 marked a seminal moment in modern Antarctic history, with the crumbling of the Larsen A ice shelf, a floating plain of ice fed by glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula. Less than a decade later, its southern neighbor, the Larsen B ice shelf, disintegrated, stunning polar scientists. After the spectacular collapses of Larsen A and B… Read More

Sea Level Rise Is On the Up and Up

Sea Level Rise Is On the Up and Up

Sea level rise is a game of millimeters a year, but those millimeters add up to a huge amount of water entering the world’s oceans. And the rising tide could eventually swamp cities around the globe. With tide gauges distributed sparsely around the planet, scientists have turned to satellites to provide a global picture of sea level since the early… Read More

Arctic Ice Melting Faster and Earlier With Dire Results

Arctic Ice Melting Faster and Earlier With Dire Results

There was less ice in the Arctic this winter than in any other winter during the satellite era, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists said on Tuesday. The announcement was consistent with previous predictions that the Arctic would have entirely ice-free summers by 2040, they said in a briefing to the media on the state of clima… Read More

U.S. Hurricane Drought ‘A Matter of Luck’

U.S. Hurricane Drought ‘A Matter of Luck’

From water to your dating life, most droughts are tough. But in the case of major hurricanes, a dry spell can be a good thing. And the U.S. has been in one for nine years. Every day that passes without a major hurricane hitting the U.S. stretches the current record-setting hurricane drought just a bit further. The last major hurricane … Read More

Climate Change Will Greatly Impact Australians’ Health

Climate Change Will Greatly Impact Australians’ Health

Climate change will have significant repercussions for Australians’ health as warming temperatures fuel extreme weather events, help spread disease and disrupt food and water supplies, according to a report backed by the country’s peak scientific and medical bodies. The report, released by the Australian Academy of Science, warns that vulnerable… Read More

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Alaska’s Ice Drain 2004-07 Alaska has been shedding large amounts of ice into the sea - on average, enough to fill a daily freight train around the world.

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