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Arctic Sea Ice to Reach Sixth Lowest Extent on Record

Arctic Sea Ice to Reach Sixth Lowest Extent on Record

As summer draws to a close, the Arctic sea ice melt season is coming to an end. And while the season didn’t top 2012’s astounding record melt, it has still resulted in what will likely be the sixth lowest September minimum ice extent on record. The extent of the ice on Sept. 15 was 1.96 million square miles, according to the National Snow and Ice D… Read More

The $90 Trillion Climate-Stabilizing Cookbook

The $90 Trillion Climate-Stabilizing Cookbook

We’re baking the world; on track to raise global temperatures by more than 7°F by burning fuels, raising livestock, bulldozing forests, and allowing cities to sprawl as they grow. Pulling the planet out of the costly slow-cooker of old-fashioned traditions in time to avoid the worst of global warming might not be easy. But doing so would make the w… Read More

Coal Power Shows Zero Growth in 2014, Report Shows

Coal Power Shows Zero Growth in 2014, Report Shows

As utilities across the U.S. have added new electric power generating capacity, most of that added capacity has come from natural gas and solar. No new coal power-generating capacity has been added yet in 2014, though two small plants are expected to open this year in North Dakota and Mississippi.… Read More

Warming Air Was Trigger for Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse

Warming Air Was Trigger for Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse

It was clear to anyone who went to Antarctica in the summer of 2001-02 that it was an unusually warm one — record-setting, in fact — and just one in a series of warm austral summers. In December 2001, geologic oceanographer Eugene Domack, now at the University of South Florida, was part of an expedition sampling the Southern Ocean seafloor around… Read More

Calif. Plans Nation’s Most Detailed Sea Level Database

Calif. Plans Nation’s Most Detailed Sea Level Database

To help adapt to the increased flood-risks affecting people and property in these landscapes, California is about to compile the nation’s most elaborate sea level rise planning database. The task won’t be easy. California’s bureaucracy can be as bewildering as its hydrology. Which is one of the reasons its lawmakers are directing a single agency t… Read More

New York to Become a Hub of Climate Hubbub

New York to Become a Hub of Climate Hubbub

Does “climate week NYC” mean the Big Apple’s climate is weakening? No, and you’ve apparently found an audible version of this article. Climate change is strengthening some natural phenomena, such as flooding, and weakening others, such as the jet streams that can lock frigid Arctic weather in place. Humanity’s role in changing the climate like thi… Read More

Can Birds Be Protected From Huge Solar Plants?

Can Birds Be Protected From Huge Solar Plants?

You might never have seen an Yuma clapper rail. Fewer than 1,000 are thought to still be sloshing about in cattail-thick marshes from Mexico up to Utah and across to California. But if you were lucky enough to spot one, you might chuckle at its oversized toes. When officials with the National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory saw one of these… Read More

A Tale of Two Cities: Miami, New York and Life on the Edge

A Tale of Two Cities: Miami, New York and Life on the Edge

Walking along the waterfront in Fort Lauderdale and admiring the 60-foot yachts docked alongside impressive homes, it’s hard to imagine that this city could suffer the same financial fate as Detroit. But it is almost as hard to imagine how they will avoid a similar crisis given the sea level rise predicted by scientists. The Miami-Fort Lauderdale … Read More