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Kansas Takes Air Out of Wind Power Mandate

Kansas Takes Air Out of Wind Power Mandate

The renewable power mandate in Kansas, which helped vault the state to become one of the top six wind power producers in the country, may be about to become a victim of its own success. Gov. Sam Brownback is poised to sign a bill repealing the mandate and making it voluntary instead. Kansas’ mandate requires six major utilities to generate … Read More

Climate Change May Put Power Grid at Risk in the West

Climate Change May Put Power Grid at Risk in the West

The ravages of climate change could severely hurt the ability of utilities in the 11 Western states to generate power unless they “climate proof” their power grid using renewables and energy efficiency, something they are not prepared for, according to a new study. For nearly half of the West’s existing power plants, climate change could reduce … Read More

Is Warming Changing Boundaries of Hurricane Season?

Is Warming Changing Boundaries of Hurricane Season?

Hurricane season doesn’t officially begin until June 1, but tell that to Tropical Storm Ana, which made landfall on the South Carolina coast early May 10. May storms, while unusual, aren’t unprecedented, since the official season dates are artificial. Records suggest they happen about once every six years. But in the ever-present context of a… Read More

A Global Milestone: CO2 Passes 400 PPM

A Global Milestone: CO2 Passes 400 PPM

Another month, another carbon dioxide record. This time the record extends beyond the rocky slopes of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, home to the most storied carbon dioxide record, and includes 39 other sites around the globe to paint a troubling picture of a greenhouse gas rise with no signs of slowing down. For the first time since record keeping began … Read More

U.S. Emissions, Economic Growth Headed Toward Divorce

U.S. Emissions, Economic Growth Headed Toward Divorce

Call them a couple: The U.S. economy and energy consumption, along with the greenhouse gas emissions they create, have always grown and plunged together. But as the U.S. embraces energy efficiency and renewables, those things aren’t dancing to quite the same beat anymore. In fact, they’re “decoupling,” and could be heading toward a divorce.… Read More

Pacific Northwest’s ‘Wet Drought’ Possible Sign of Future

Pacific Northwest’s ‘Wet Drought’ Possible Sign of Future

The desiccated soils and barren slopes of California have grabbed news headlines in recent weeks, as the state entered its fourth year of a deep drought that has forced unprecedented statewide water restrictions. But while most eyes have been trained on the plight of the Golden State, its neighbors to the north are also facing a dearth of water… Read More

Blooming Algae Could Accelerate Arctic Warming

Blooming Algae Could Accelerate Arctic Warming

Scientists already know that receding sea ice allows solar energy to warm exposed water rather than reflect back into space, but blooms of algae could make matters even worse. By the end of the century, researchers say, the blooms could lead Arctic warming to increase by as much as 20 percent.… Read More

The State of the Earth in 4 Climate Trends

The State of the Earth in 4 Climate Trends

What better day to step back and take stock of the planet than Earth Day? Started in 1970 to raise awareness in the U.S. about the environmental state of the planet, Earth Day is now celebrated in more than 190 countries and has led to the creation of legislation in the U.S. aimed at protecting the environment. But one global trend has continued… Read More

Gallery

Temps Marching Upward Since First Earth Day The contiguous U.S. has warmed 2.1°F since the first Earth Day in 1970.

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