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A Mississippi-Sized Area of Forest Disappeared in 2015

A Mississippi-Sized Area of Forest Disappeared in 2015

A Mississippi-sized chunk of the world’s forests was decimated in 2015 because of wildfire, logging and expanding palm oil plantations, according to a new study. The loss is part of a continuing trend of deforestation that could have devastating implications for the climate. About 49 million acres of forest disappeared worldwide in 2015, mainly in… Read More

South Miami Just Made a Huge Rooftop Solar Decision

South Miami Just Made a Huge Rooftop Solar Decision

South Miami this week became the first city outside of California to require all new homes to install solar panels on their roofs. Six cities in the Golden State began requiring solar to be installed on new homes over the past few years. But in Florida, where voters killed proposed solar restrictions last year, South Miami is now a pioneer. This… Read More

Rising Seas Spark Tobacco-Style Lawsuits in California

Rising Seas Spark Tobacco-Style Lawsuits in California

Several flood-prone municipalities in California filed first-of-their-kind lawsuits against fossil fuel companies this week as they attempt to recoup the cost of coping with rising seas. The suits point to indisputable climate science and decades of industry efforts to mar that science. Experts likened the legal complaints to those brought against… Read More

Rising Temps Could Bring Flight Delays Worldwide

Rising Temps Could Bring Flight Delays Worldwide

Imagine boarding a summertime flight at LaGuardia Airport in New York City, only to be told that the airline needs a dozen or so passengers to take a later flight because it’s too hot outside for the plane to take off fully loaded. That could become a common scenario at 19 major airports worldwide as extreme heat caused by global warming disrupts … Read More

Climate Change Will Hit the Poorest the Hardest in the U.S.

Climate Change Will Hit the Poorest the Hardest in the U.S.

Union County is tucked in northern Florida, half an hour north of Gainesville and an hour west of Jacksonville. It’s Florida’s smallest county, a mostly unremarkable landlocked stretch of pine forest interspersed with lakes. More than 15,000 people call it home, working largely in healthcare, transportation and public administration. The state … Read More

States Betting on Giant Batteries to Cut Carbon

States Betting on Giant Batteries to Cut Carbon

Some states and electric power companies are rolling out a new weapon against fossil fuels — giant batteries. A growing number of states are requiring large batteries to be used to store electricity to help expand wind and solar power. The trend is catching on quickly as at least three states have created energy storage targets or incentives so… Read More

Climate Change Altering Droughts, Impacts Across U.S.

Climate Change Altering Droughts, Impacts Across U.S.

As a major drought devastated the West and Midwest beginning in 2012, farmers racked up billions of dollars in crop losses and water managers grappled with possible water shortages for millions of people as reservoirs dried up in the heat. That drought is now gone. But scientists have found that the dry spell showed unusual wild extremes of … Read More

Atlantic Oil Surveys Could Kill Food Used By Fisheries

Atlantic Oil Surveys Could Kill Food Used By Fisheries

The microscopic animals that provide food for fisheries face previously unknown threats along America’s southern and eastern seaboards, and in oceans elsewhere, with new research warning of the potential for heavy impacts from oil surveys that blast noise into the sea. Scientists from the Australian island state of Tasmania have added krill larvae… Read More

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Natural & Human-caused Coastal Flood Days in the U.S. New analysis looks at the human-caused influence on the number of coastal flood days across the U.S.

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