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All of 2015’s Rain for the U.S. in 14 Seconds

All of 2015’s Rain for the U.S. in 14 Seconds

It’s no secret that it has been really wet in the Southeast and really dry out West over the first half of the year. But to really understand the split and how we got here, NASA has a helpful, color recap of the year in rain. The imagery comes courtesy of the agency’s Global Precipitation Measurement constellation of satellites. In February last … Read More

Warming May Boost Wind Energy in Plains States

Warming May Boost Wind Energy in Plains States

Powerful winds are commonplace in the U.S. prairie states, which experienced walls of dirt swept into the air by these gusts during the Dust Bowl. While today's winds don't often carry the huge quantities of dust that they did in the 1930s, they’re stirring up something significantly more useful in states like Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas – energy. … Read More

U.S. Summers Bringing More and More Heat

U.S. Summers Bringing More and More Heat

It’s officially summer! We have now passed the points that mark the traditional start to summer (Memorial Day), the meteorological start (June 1), and now the astronomical start, or summer solstice (June 21) — so break out those flip-flops and beach towels! Though June, July, and August usually bring the heat, for parts of the country spring felt … Read More

What Bill’s Downpours Tell Us About Texas’ Future

What Bill’s Downpours Tell Us About Texas’ Future

Tropical Storm Bill is smashing into the Texas coast, bringing with it storm surge, high winds and, most worryingly, potentially very heavy rains. Eastern Texas is already waterlogged after record-breaking May rainfall, and is expected to see another 4 to 8 inches (and possibly localized spots up to 12 inches), setting up the likelihood of… Read More

Rainy May Sets Record for Soggy U.S.

Rainy May Sets Record for Soggy U.S.

The numbers are in, and the month of May broke a number of records across the U.S. Alaska had its warmest May by a wide margin. California continued to see its warmest year-to-date. And thanks to staggering rains that swamped the Southern Plains, May was the wettest month on record for the contiguous U.S. Total precipitation for the Lower 48 in… Read More

Texas’s Warmer Future: Drought and Heavy Rains?

Texas’s Warmer Future: Drought and Heavy Rains?

The seemingly endless and often torrential rains that deluged Texas and Oklahoma in May are in some ways a harbinger of what the South Central states can expect to see as the world warms. But the region also could be in store for just the opposite – more long bouts of hot, dry days that could cause the Southern Plains to be even more susceptible to… Read More

Will The West Ever Be Able To Live With Fire?

Will The West Ever Be Able To Live With Fire?

Scientific progress and more than a century of living with wildfire have boosted Western resilience to the threat. But improvements in how wildfire dangers have been managed have fallen far short of the reimaginations of landscapes that are needed. “We’ve made good progress, but not good enough,” Jan van Wagtendonk, a retired Yosemite National Par… Read More

What Severe Weather Season Looks Like in 8 Seconds

What Severe Weather Season Looks Like in 8 Seconds

It’s that time of year again when flowers bloom, ice starts to find its way into coffee and afternoon strolls are a must. Ah, spring. Yet for all the wonders warmer temperatures can bring, there are a few downsides. Allergies for one. But those are just a minor nuisance compared to severe weather and the tornadoes it can spawn that generally … Read More

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Oklahoma City’s Wet Wednesday The city recorded more than 7 inches of rain in 24 hours, the third-highest single day rainfall total for any day on record.

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