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Wildfires Are Ruining the National Park Service’s Birthday

Wildfires Are Ruining the National Park Service’s Birthday

In honor of the agency’s 99th birthday, the National Park Service is offering free entrance to its 58 parks and 350 other sites. In the Pacific Northwest and Northern Rockies, park visitors might also be hoping that entry comes with a free respirator and x-ray vision. Smoke from large wildfires is obscuring some of the stunning vistas that inspired… Read More

El Niño Could Rank Among Strongest on Record

El Niño Could Rank Among Strongest on Record

This year’s El Niño is poised to join the ranks of the strongest such events on record, U.S. forecasters said Thursday, with potentially significant impacts for weather across the country this winter. “We’re predicting that this El Niño could be among the strongest El Niños in the historical record dating back to 1950,” Mike Halpert, the deputy… Read More

Scientists Foresee Losses as Cities Fight Beach Erosion

Scientists Foresee Losses as Cities Fight Beach Erosion

Beaches are facing off against a changing climate, and they’re losing ground. Literally. Waves, currents, storms and people all move the sand that make beaches, well, beaches. But a combination of rising sea levels, stronger coastal storms and coastal development means that sandy shorelines are increasingly disappearing, leaving the millions who … Read More

All of 2015’s Rain for the U.S. in 14 Seconds

All of 2015’s Rain for the U.S. in 14 Seconds

It’s no secret that it has been really wet in the Southeast and really dry out West over the first half of the year. But to really understand the split and how we got here, NASA has a helpful, color recap of the year in rain. The imagery comes courtesy of the agency’s Global Precipitation Measurement constellation of satellites. In February last … Read More

Soaring Temps in Pacific Northwest Shattered Records

Soaring Temps in Pacific Northwest Shattered Records

Scorching temperatures above 110°F are more often associated with the stark landscapes of places like Death Valley than the cooler reaches of the Pacific Northwest. But a suped-up heat wave has left parts of Washington feeling much more like the desert Southwest and has shattered longstanding high temperature records in many spots. The searing heat… Read More

U.S. Summers Bringing More and More Heat

U.S. Summers Bringing More and More Heat

It’s officially summer! We have now passed the points that mark the traditional start to summer (Memorial Day), the meteorological start (June 1), and now the astronomical start, or summer solstice (June 21) — so break out those flip-flops and beach towels! Though June, July, and August usually bring the heat, for parts of the country spring felt … Read More

Will The West Ever Be Able To Live With Fire?

Will The West Ever Be Able To Live With Fire?

Scientific progress and more than a century of living with wildfire have boosted Western resilience to the threat. But improvements in how wildfire dangers have been managed have fallen far short of the reimaginations of landscapes that are needed. “We’ve made good progress, but not good enough,” Jan van Wagtendonk, a retired Yosemite National Par… Read More

Texas, Oklahoma Drought ‘All But Over’

Texas, Oklahoma Drought ‘All But Over’

While the Western drought has its claws firmly dug in, the nearly five-year drought that has gripped Oklahoma and Texas is on its last legs, thanks to recent torrents of rain, government climate scientists said Thursday. “I think the Texas drought is pretty much all but over,” Victor Murphy, climate services program manager for the National Weather… Read More

Gallery

Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season May 15 marks the statistical peak of the eastern Pacific hurricane season.

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