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Antarctica’s Icy ‘Doorstops’ Thin; Rising Seas At Risk

Antarctica’s Icy ‘Doorstops’ Thin; Rising Seas At Risk

Over the past two decades, the massive platforms of floating ice that dot the coast of Antarctica have been thinning and doing so at an increasing rate, likely at least in part because of global warming. Scientists are worried about its implications for significant sea level rise. The ice shelves — some of which are larger than California and… Read More

The West Coast Is in Hot Water

The West Coast Is in Hot Water

Move over polar bears. Are starving sea lion pups the new face of climate change? This year’s slew of hungry pups washing ashore in California, which has generated a slew of media coverage replete with heart-tugging images, has roots in natural temperature fluctuations in the ocean. But in the coming decades, human-induced warming could make these… Read More

Atlantic Circulation Weaker Than In Last Thousand Years

Atlantic Circulation Weaker Than In Last Thousand Years

Powerful Atlantic Ocean currents fuel Gulf streams, affect sea levels, warm cities in continental Europe and North America, and bring nutrients up from ocean depths that help sustain marine ecosystems and fisheries. But an avalanche of cold water from the melting Greenland ice sheet appears to be slowing the ocean circulation to levels not experie… Read More

Climate Work Highlighted on World Meteorological Day

Climate Work Highlighted on World Meteorological Day

The United Nations agency responsible for comprehensively tracking the planet’s weather and climate system has once again raised its voice to add to the chorus proclaiming the exceptional warmth that pervaded the planet as a whole last year, along with many particular regions and countries. A new report released Monday by the World Meteorological… Read More

Include Climate Change in Disaster Planning, FEMA Says

Include Climate Change in Disaster Planning, FEMA Says

Federal funds that help communities brace for emergencies will stop being provided to states if they ignore threats posed by climate change in their disaster planning. States publish reports every five years or so detailing their vulnerability to natural disasters, such as floods, storms and wildfires, and how they plan to protect themselves and r… Read More

Climate Change on International Disaster Talks Agenda

Climate Change on International Disaster Talks Agenda

It may be nine months until pivotal climate negotiations get underway in Paris, but climate change is very much on the international agenda this week in Sendai, Japan. Countries from the around world have convened there at the behest of the United Nations for the World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction with the goal of updating a 10-year-old ag… Read More

Southern California’s Fog Falls Victim to Concrete

Southern California’s Fog Falls Victim to Concrete

Summertime fog that helps keep coastal southern California cool and damp appears to be melting away, and scientists who have documented nearly 70 years of its decline think they can explain why: concrete. The urban heat island effect, the phenomenon of cities warming faster than surrounding countryside, is a main culprit for a two-thirds reduction… Read More

Maps Show El Niño Won’t Help the West’s Water Woes

Maps Show El Niño Won’t Help the West’s Water Woes

El Niño has finally proved the haters wrong. After months of being derided as “El Limbo” and “El No Show,” scientists declared the phenomenon here almost a year to the day after declaring an El Niño Watch. Sure, it’s later and wimpier than initial forecasts, but better late and weaker than never. Unless of course you’re suffering from drought in … Read More

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2013 Tornado Drought The number of tornadoes per county, January-April 2013, compared to the average.

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