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10 Years After Katrina, Slow Hurricane Season Expected

10 Years After Katrina, Slow Hurricane Season Expected

As the 10th anniversary of the busiest hurricane season on record approaches, forecasters and government officials are preparing for the start of the 2015 season. But unlike the 2005 season, which saw an unprecedented 28 storms — including one of the worst, Hurricane Katrina — this season is expected to see fewer than the average number of… Read More

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

El Niño Could Bring Drought and Famine in West Africa

A global weather phenomenon could cause a famine in the Sahel this year by combining with already dry conditions to create a “double whammy” for the region, scientists and aid groups have warned. Professor Adam Scaife, a long term forecaster at the UK Met Office Hadley Centre, said models now agreed an El Niño event was likely and the first impact… Read More

Bad News Keeps Flowing From Antarctica

Bad News Keeps Flowing From Antarctica

The massive shelves of ice that ring Antarctica have been shrinking over the past couple of decades, and that could have grave implications for sea level rise. It’s not the ice shelves themselves that pose a problem: they’re mostly afloat, so when they melt or dump massive icebergs, it doesn’t affect water levels any more than melting ice cubes … Read More

Heat is Piling Up in the Depths of the Indian Ocean

Heat is Piling Up in the Depths of the Indian Ocean

The world’s oceans are playing a game of hot potato with the excess heat trapped by greenhouse gas emissions. Scientists have zeroed in on the tropical Pacific as a major player in taking up that heat. But while it might have held that heat for a bit, new research shows that the Pacific has passed the potato to the Indian Ocean, which has seen an … Read More

The ABCs of Antarctic Ice Shelf Melting

The ABCs of Antarctic Ice Shelf Melting

January 1995 marked a seminal moment in modern Antarctic history, with the crumbling of the Larsen A ice shelf, a floating plain of ice fed by glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula. Less than a decade later, its southern neighbor, the Larsen B ice shelf, disintegrated, stunning polar scientists. After the spectacular collapses of Larsen A and B… Read More

‘Steel on the Water’ Critical for Offshore Wind in U.S.

‘Steel on the Water’ Critical for Offshore Wind in U.S.

Offshore wind power, a source of renewable energy that Europeans have been investing in for decades, has not yet materialized in the U.S. as debates have swirled about the viability of wind farms off the country’s coastlines. That, however, may be about to change. The Block Island Wind Farm is set to break ground in July off the coast of … Read More

Sea Level Rise Is On the Up and Up

Sea Level Rise Is On the Up and Up

Sea level rise is a game of millimeters a year, but those millimeters add up to a huge amount of water entering the world’s oceans. And the rising tide could eventually swamp cities around the globe. With tide gauges distributed sparsely around the planet, scientists have turned to satellites to provide a global picture of sea level since the early… Read More

Arctic Ice Melting Faster and Earlier With Dire Results

Arctic Ice Melting Faster and Earlier With Dire Results

There was less ice in the Arctic this winter than in any other winter during the satellite era, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists said on Tuesday. The announcement was consistent with previous predictions that the Arctic would have entirely ice-free summers by 2040, they said in a briefing to the media on the state of clima… Read More

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Spring Snow Cover While this has been a snowy winter, the past 50 years have shown a trend of less spring snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere.

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