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Mild Winter Keeps Great Lakes Ice Cover Low

Mild Winter Keeps Great Lakes Ice Cover Low

This week, parts of Oswego County in New York got a stunning 3 feet of lake effect snow. It was a rare event for a February and one that can be pinned to near “rock bottom” ice cover on the Great Lakes, as one scientist put it. Ice cover on the lakes stood at a mere 12 percent as of Feb. 11 (compared to 63 percent at the same time last year) thank… Read More

Lingering El Niño Could Mean Fewer Tornadoes This Year

Lingering El Niño Could Mean Fewer Tornadoes This Year

Last year brought a huge advance in tornado forecasting: the first seasonal severe weather forecast for the U.S. The forecast proved to be accurate and now researchers are back with a second forecast: a below average number of tornadoes and hailstorms for the coming year. The new forecast was presented at the American Meteorological Society’s … Read More

Two Charts Show December’s Crazy Warmth

Two Charts Show December’s Crazy Warmth

If you live in the eastern half of the U.S., you probably don’t need anyone to tell you that it has been ridiculously warm this month. Just how warm is illustrated by two eye-popping charts that show there have been more than 20 times as many daily heat records as cold ones this month and that nearly a third of the Lower 48 has seen temperatures… Read More

Bitterly Cold Winters Less Likely for East Coast

Bitterly Cold Winters Less Likely for East Coast

The relentless bitter cold the U.S. East Coast faced during the winter of 2013-2014 is becoming increasingly rare — possibly 20 to 100 times less likely to occur because of warming, a study released Thursday said. But no warming connection could be found to the repeated snowstorms that painted the East Coast white during that same winter, another … Read More

Warming May Boost Wind Energy in Plains States

Warming May Boost Wind Energy in Plains States

Powerful winds are commonplace in the U.S. prairie states, which experienced walls of dirt swept into the air by these gusts during the Dust Bowl. While today's winds don't often carry the huge quantities of dust that they did in the 1930s, they’re stirring up something significantly more useful in states like Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas – energy. … Read More

Heavier Rains Mean More Toxic Blooms for Lake Erie

Heavier Rains Mean More Toxic Blooms for Lake Erie

Come September, Lake Erie might face a toxic algae bloom that could rival the record-setting spread of scum that happened in 2011. And such blooms could become more common as the warming climate fuels more downpours that wash bloom-fueling fertilizers into the lake. The forecast for a severe bloom this year, made in early July by scientists with … Read More

U.S. Summers Bringing More and More Heat

U.S. Summers Bringing More and More Heat

It’s officially summer! We have now passed the points that mark the traditional start to summer (Memorial Day), the meteorological start (June 1), and now the astronomical start, or summer solstice (June 21) — so break out those flip-flops and beach towels! Though June, July, and August usually bring the heat, for parts of the country spring felt … Read More

Kansas Takes Air Out of Wind Power Mandate

Kansas Takes Air Out of Wind Power Mandate

The renewable power mandate in Kansas, which helped vault the state to become one of the top six wind power producers in the country, may be about to become a victim of its own success. Gov. Sam Brownback is poised to sign a bill repealing the mandate and making it voluntary instead. Kansas’ mandate requires six major utilities to generate … Read More

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All the Ice on Greenland Greenland holds enough ice to raise global sea level 23 feet or to fill the Lower 48 states 2,940 feet high, like a bathtub.

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